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Mitch McConnell says Donald Trump ‘PROVOKED’ the MAGA riot in dramatic denunciation of president

Mitch McConnell denounced Donald Trump Tuesday, saying that the president was responsible for ‘provoking’ the MAGA mob who stormed the Capitol and murdered a police officer.

‘The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people,’ the majority leader said on the Senate floor.

‘They tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government, which they did not like,’ McConnell continued.

‘But we pressed on. We stood together and said an angry mob would not get veto power over the rule of law in our nation.’

The dramatic and unprompted intervention by the man who will be Republicans’ most senior leader when Trump leaves office came with less than 24 hours of his presidency remaining.

Adding to its resonance, the speech is one of the last acts of his time as Republican majority leader; he will become the minority leader once the two new Georgia Democratic senators are sworn in on Wednesday. 

It takes McConnell much closer to publicly declaring he will convict Trump at his Senate impeachment trial and gives significant cover to members of the GOP caucus to vote to convict too. 

But it also shows the deep divisions inside the Republican Senate, with the only members to make their positions known so far three who say they will not convict: Lindsey Graham, Rand Paul and Tom Cotton. 

McConnell and Schumer are waiting for Nancy Pelosi to send the single article of impeachment accusing Trump of ‘incitement of insurrection’ to them, which will begin the Senate trial. 

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said during remarks on the Senate floor Tuesday that Donald Trump ‘provoked’ the crowd who stormed the Capitol two weeks ago is his most outright denunciation of the president to date

'The mob was fed lies," McConnell said as the Senate reconvened on Tuesday. 'They were provoked by the president and other powerful people'

‘The mob was fed lies,’ McConnell said as the Senate reconvened on Tuesday. ‘They were provoked by the president and other powerful people’

'The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people,' McConnell said of Trump's speech to thousands of his supporters before they descended on Capitol Hill

‘The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people,’ McConnell said of Trump’s speech to thousands of his supporters before they descended on Capitol Hill

McConnell’s break with Trump comes as several Republicans, including former administration officials, turn against the president in the fallout of the Capitol riot by thousands of Trump supporters.

On Monday, former Attorney General Bill Barr told ITV News that the attack on the Capitol was ‘precipitated’ by Trump’s repeated claims of election fraud. He also compared those involved in the mob to Islamic terrorists.

‘That was the thing that precipitated riots on the Hill,’ Barr said when asked if the debate over election integrity contributed to the scene at the Capitol.

‘I’ll leave it to the people who are looking into the genesis of this to say whether incitement was involved,’ Barr said, stopping short of calling Trump’s words ‘incitement of insurrection.’

Hundreds were injured in the riot two weeks ago and five died, including a Capitol Police officer, Brian Sicknick, who was hit over the head by a protester with a fire hydrant and a female pro-Trump demonstrator, Ashli Babbit, who was shot in the chest in the chaos. 

McConnell also praised law enforcement during his floor remarks Tuesday for already making more than 100 arrested related to the riot.

‘A great deal has already been said about the disgraceful events of January 6,’ the Kentucky Republican said. ‘More will be said in the weeks ahead. I understand the FBI has already made at least 100 arrests and the Justice Department reports more than 275 persons are under investigation, a number that is climbing fast.’

He added: ‘I want to commend the work of the department to swiftly investigate and bring offenders to justice.’

‘I want to reaffirm the huge respect and gratitude that I have and I believe all senators have for the men and women of the U.S. Capitol Police, who put their own safety on the line every single day that they clock in and stand guard.’

He paid tribute to Sicknick, the only law enforcement to die as a result of the violent attack, as well as fellow Capitol Police officer Howard Liebengood, who died three days after the riotin an off-duty suicide.

‘Neither the institution of Congress nor the American people will ever forget the bravery and the valor of Officer Brian Sicknick, who sacrificed himself to protect this place and those inside,’ McConnell said. ‘We’ll not forget our friend, Officer Howard Liebengood, and we’ll never forget our debt to all the brave USCP officers and their families.

He thanks the National Guard and other law enforcement entities for deploying to Washington to help patrol the nation’s capital in the weeks between the unprecedented attack and Biden’s inauguration on Wednesday.As of Tuesday, around 25,000 National Guard members are stationed in D.C. as they prepare for potential attacks surrounding the presidential transition from Trump to Biden. 

The House voted last Wednesday on an impeachment article, but it is still unclear if enough Republicans in the Senate will cross the line to convict the president.

McConnell has already publicly given the OK for his caucus to convict Trump on ‘incitement of insurrection’ after the House voted last Wednesday to impeach the president on this charge.

Thousands of pro-Trump protesters descended on the Capitol Wednesday, January 6 in an attempt to stop Congress from voting to certify the election for Joe Biden

Thousands of pro-Trump protesters descended on the Capitol Wednesday, January 6 in an attempt to stop Congress from voting to certify the election for Joe Biden

The leader also said previously that he is genuinely undecided on which way he will vote.

Roy Blunt said Monday evening that there was a lot of damage done to the GOP’s ‘reputation’ in the Capitol breach earlier this month, but stopped short of saying if he would vote to convict. 

‘What happened here two weeks ago was one of the great stains on the history of the country, in my view. It was outrageous. It was totally unforgivable.’ Blunt told Norah O’Donnell on ‘CBS Evening News’ on Monday.

When asked about the potential of Trump using his last two days to pardon those involved in the storming of the Capitol two weeks ago, Blunt said: ‘I think that’d be disastrous. I think what they did is unpardonable.’

The Missouri senator is one of the two lawmakers put in charge of the inauguration – along with Democratic Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. 

McConnell, in the rest of his remarks Tuesday, suggested business will go forward as usual – even as impeachment plows forward and Senate Republicans will lose their majority as the party split comes to 50-50 this month.

‘Tomorrow President-elect Biden and Vice President-elect Harris will be sworn in,’ McConnell said, echoing other lawmakers’ sentiments of a smoother-than-expected transition. ‘We’ll have a safe and successful inaugural right here on the west front of the Capitol, the space that President Bush 41 called ‘democracy’s front porch.’ Then we’ll move forward.’

‘Our work for the American people will continue, as it has for more than 230 years,’ he continued. ‘There are serious challenges that our nation needs to continue confronting, but there will also be great and hopeful opportunities for us to seize.’

He voiced his concern that the federal legislator will be so closely split going into the 117th Congress.

‘Certainly November’s elections did not hand any side a mandate for sweeping ideological change,’ McConnell said. ‘Americans elected a closely divided Senate, a closely divided House, and a presidential candidate who said he’d represent everyone.’ 

Blunt, although condemning the violent descent on the Capitol by around 1,000 Trump supporters, did not say if he would vote to convict Trump of ‘incitement of insurrection’ when the article of impeachment reaches the Senate.

‘THE PRESIDENT PROVOKED THE MOB WITH LIES.’ READ MITCH McCONNELL’S FULL SENATE DENUNCIATION OF TRUMP

The last time the Senate convened, we had just reclaimed the Capitol from violent criminals who tried to stop Congress from doing our duty.

The mob was fed lies. They were provoked by the president and other powerful people.

And they tried to use fear and violence to stop a specific proceeding of the first branch of the federal government which they did not like.

But we pressed on. We stood together, and said an angry mob would not get veto power over the rule of law in our nation, not even for one night.

We certified the people’s choice for their 46th president.

Tomorrow President-elect Biden and Vice President-elect Harris will be sworn in. We’ll have a safe and successful inaugural right here on the west front of the Capitol, the space that President Bush 41 called ‘democracy’s front porch.’ Then we’ll move forward.

Our work for the American people will continue, as it has for more than 230 years. There are serious challenges that our nation needs to continue confronting, but there will also be great and hopeful opportunities for us to seize.

Certainly November’s elections did not hand any side a mandate for sweeping ideological change. Americans elected a closely divided Senate, a closely divided House, and a presidential candidate who said he’d represent everyone.

So our marching orders from the American people are clear — we’re to have a robust discussion and seek common ground. We are to pursue bipartisan agreement everywhere we can and check and balance one another respectfully where we must.

And through all of this we must always keep in mind that we’re all Americans. We all love this country, and we’re all in this together.

Now, on a related matter, a great deal has already been said about the disgraceful events of January 6. More will be said in the weeks ahead. I understand the FBI has already made at least 100 arrests and the Justice Department reports more than 275 persons are under investigation, a number that is climbing fast.

I want to commend the work of the department to swiftly investigate and bring offenders to justice.

As I’ve stated, January 6 saw failures of institutions, protocols, and planning. Those failures did not just leave Congress itself exposed. They also left the courageous men and women of the Capitol Police themselves in a totally untenable situation.

So today I want to reaffirm the huge respect and gratitude that I have and I believe all senators have for the men and women of the U.S. Capitol Police, who put their own safety on the line every single day that they clock in and stand guard.

Neither the institution of Congress nor the American people will ever forget the bravery and the valor of Officer Brian Sicknick, who sacrificed himself to protect this place and those inside. We’ll not forget our friend, Officer Howard Liebengood, and we’ll never forget our debt to all the brave USCP officers and their families.

It is more than just comforting to come to work in a place protected by such fine men and women at risk to themselves. It is also very humbling.

We’re also grateful to the local officers from D.C., Virginia, and Maryland, the federal law enforcement officers, the National Guard, the Secret Service, and all the other professionals who helped subdue the criminals and secure the Capitol and are working for peace this week.

Tomorrow a new president and vice president will swear their oaths of offices. They will also do so safely and securely because so many brave men and women have sworn their own oaths to support and defend our Constitution. We salute you all.

Republican Senator Roy Blunt called the Capitol storming two weeks ago 'one of the great stains on the history of the country' – he did not specifically condemn Donald Trump for any involvement in the attack

Republican Senator Roy Blunt called the Capitol storming two weeks ago ‘one of the great stains on the history of the country’ – he did not specifically condemn Donald Trump for any involvement in the attack

Blunt (right), along with Democrat Amy Klobcuhar (left), are in charge of Joe Biden's inauguration. Blunt said Trump pardoning any of those involved in the storming would be 'disastrous': 'I think what they did is unpardonable'

Blunt (right), along with Democrat Amy Klobcuhar (left), are in charge of Joe Biden’s inauguration. Blunt said Trump pardoning any of those involved in the storming would be ‘disastrous’: ‘I think what they did is unpardonable’

Blunt said small fixes, like repainting, had to take place to get the building ready for inauguration after the riots. Federal K-9 units sweep the building Tuesday before the ceremonies at the Capitol Wednesday

Blunt said small fixes, like repainting, had to take place to get the building ready for inauguration after the riots. Federal K-9 units sweep the building Tuesday before the ceremonies at the Capitol Wednesday

Instead of a massive crowd, this year 200,000 miniature flags occupy the National Mall where an audience would usually observe the inauguration

Instead of a massive crowd, this year 200,000 miniature flags occupy the National Mall where an audience would usually observe the inauguration 

GOP SENATORS DEMOCRATS MIGHT CONVINCE TO CONVICT TRUMP

To get a two-thirds majority of every voting senator Democrats need at least 17 Republicans, assuming all Democrats vote to convict. None of the 50-member GOP caucus has said they will vote to convict. Here are some of those in play. 

HATERS AND ESTABLISHMENT 

Mitt Romney (Utah)

Voted to convict before and slammed Trump’s actions after riot.

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

Said Trump should quit over the riot. Already survived a primary defeat

Mitch McConnell (Kentucky)

Publicly OKed his caucus voting guilty and says he is genuinely undecided

Pat Toomey (Pennsylvania)

Not running again and already condemned Trump’s conduct

Richard Burr (North Carolina) 

Not running and said Trump ‘bears responsibility’

Ben Sasse (Nebraska)

Targeted before by Trump, slammed GOP leaders for violence already

Susan Collins (Maine)

Moderate who said when she acquitted first time Trump had ‘learned a lesson’  

John Thune (South Dakota)

Number two in the Senate caucus, already target of Trump demand for a primary

John Cornyn (Texas)

Just won Texas which is headed purple, not personally loyal to Trump

Roy Blunt (Missouri)

Called riot ‘darkest stain’ and ‘unpardonable.’ State GOP establishment is furious at Josh Hawley 

Richard Shelby (Alabama)

At 86 considered unlikely to run again. Called riot ‘dark day’

Chuck Grassley (Iowa)

Oldest GOP senator at 87 and unclear if he plans to run again  

Kevin Cramer (North Dakota)

Said Trump voters ‘want my head off’ for not overturning election 

Rob Portman (Ohio)

Called attack ‘assault on democracy.’ Up in 2022, never a Trump loyalist

WILD CARDS

James Inhofe (Oklahoma)

Apologized to black voters for planning to overturn election 

Mike Lee (Utah)

Legal conservative, represents state where Trump wasn’t personally popular 

Thom Tillis (North Carolina)

Not up for election until 2026 in purple state 

Marco Rubio (Florida)

Up in 2022 and could face Ivanka; convicting her father might help 

Mike Braun (Indiana)

Friend of Mike Pence, could be moved by calls for him to ‘hang’ 

House Democrats are preparing to deliver the impeachment article to the upper chamber this week as the Senate reconvenes Wednesday – and some are pushing for an immediate trial and vote on whether to convict Trump for his part in the January 6 chaos.

All Senate Democrats will need to vote in favor of convicting and at least 17 Republican will need to cross the line for a successful two-thirds vote. It is still not clear whether that many Republican senators will finally break ties with the president after he leaves Washington on Wednesday.

Democrats were pushing for Trump to resign or Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to get Trump out of office before his end date on Wednesday, January 20. When both of those options were exhausted, Speaker Nancy Pelosi moved forward with impeachment – and last Wednesday the House voted to impeach the president for a second time.

They claim Trump is the one to blame for the Capitol storming after he riled up thousands of his supporters at a rally near the White House January 6 before they marched over to Capitol Hill and wreaked havoc on the building for six hours.

Trump condemned the violence and vowed following the riot that there would be a peaceful transition of power. He did not, however, concede that he lost the election to Joe Biden.  

‘Is there any doubt in your mind that there will be a peaceful transfer of power?’ O’Donnell asked Blunt. 

‘No. No doubt at all,’ he said. ‘And I think we’re gonna project to the world exactly the message we want to at this very spot where so many bad things happened two weeks ago. I think the world’s gonna see the Constitution and the democracy of our country work.’

O’Donnell pressed Blunt on if he’s disappointed that Trump won’t attend the inauguration of Biden – like is tradition to do when one president exits and another enters.

‘I think the president should have been here, and I’m disappointed,’ Blunt said.

Blunt said not enough damage was done to the Capitol and there wasn’t too much of a threat to move the inauguration to another location.

‘This is not only a moment of importance, but the fact that we do it and where we do it matters,’ Blunt said. ‘And it’s really important to maintain that sense of the continuity of both our Constitution and our democracy.’

‘:A lot of damage was done to our reputation, not much done to the building,’ the Republican continued.

This year’s inauguration, however, is anything but typical. 

Biden will still be sworn in on the steps of the Capitol, but Trump will not be in attendance.

The massive crowd that usually attends an inauguration will also not be there, instead taking their place are nearly 200,000 miniature flags placed all over the National Mall.

The president-elect’s inauguration was made private in light of the coronavirus pandemic and persistent threats to lawmakers and the incoming administration following the Capitol storming two weeks ago.

There will be a small, invite-only crowd seated socially-distant from each other. 

As Biden faces the potential of his inauguration being split-screened with Trump’s impending impeachment trial, it’s still unclear how successful the efforts in the Senate will be.

So far, it appears Democrats have at least 13 Republicans they are looking to convince to vote to convict – and there seems to be five other ‘wild cards’ they are looking to flip.

Among those who could cross the aisle to vote for Trump’s conviction are Senators Mitt Romney. The Utah Republican was the only GOP senator to vote to convict Trump on one of the two impeachment articles levied against him in 2019. Romney also has been an frequent Trump critic and has already slammed the president for his actions following the Capitol riot.  

Here state and territory flags are seen on the National Mall to represent all areas of the U.S. during Biden's inauguration

Here state and territory flags are seen on the National Mall to represent all areas of the U.S. during Biden’s inauguration

Around 25,000 National Guard troops descended on Washington D.C. over the last two weeks as they were deployed there from all over the country to patrol the nation's capital in the wake of the chaos

Around 25,000 National Guard troops descended on Washington D.C. over the last two weeks as they were deployed there from all over the country to patrol the nation’s capital in the wake of the chaos

Wild cards include the likes of Mike Lee of Utah, Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Marco Rubio of Florida.

If Trump is convicted, the Senate can vote next on a ban from running for office in the future – perhaps a more impactful punishment considering Trump is very likely to launch a 2024 bid for the White House.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE OF IMPEACHMENT

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Headline USA New York Politics

Mitch McConnell complicates Trump’s Senate trial, although he supports it | The State

Senate Leader Mitch McConnell.

Photo:
SAUL LOEB / AFP / Getty Images

Majority Leader in the Senate, Mitch McConnell (Kentucky), told his colleagues that this chamber will not address any matter before January 19, unless the 100 senators agree to call a session.

Because of this, the impeachment against the president Donald trump that the House of Representatives would approve will not be able to be attended soon, although the Republican leader announced that he will agree to start the process, according to a report by The New York Times.

“The consent of all 100 senators would be required to conduct any kind of business during sessions … scheduled before January 19,” the memo reads. “Therefore, the trial in the Senate would begin after President Trump’s term expires, either one hour after its expiration on January 20 or 25 hours after its expiration on January 21.”.

This despite the minority leader, Charles schumer (New York), requested the convocation to advance with the process before the president leaves office.

According The Hill, that was established in a memorandum distributed last week.

It should be clarified that the Senate cannot convict President Trump once he leaves office, according to several constitutional experts.

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Georgia Headline USA Politics

McConnell says Trump demand to overturn election a ‘poisonous path’

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell absolutely shamed his Republican colleagues for mounting challenges to the Electoral College calling it a ‘poisonous path,’ which would put democracy in a ‘death spiral.’  

McConnell also made clear that he did not believe there was any evidence of widespread voter fraud, as President Donald Trump has claimed.   

‘We’re debating a step that has neve been taken in American history, whether Congress should overrule the voters and overtrun a presidential election,’ he said on the Senate floor, after Rep. Paul Gosar and a batch of GOP senators, including Sen. Ted Cruz, objected to Arizona’s Electoral College vote count. 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ripped his GOP colleagues who are trying to mount challenges to the presidential election during a Congressional session Wednesday 

McConnell ridiculed President Donald Trump’s claims of widespread voter fraud in a five-minute speech which will be one of his last as majority leader – and which he said was about the most important vote of his career. 

‘The assertions range from specific, local allegations to Constitutional arguments to sweeping conspiracy theories,’ McConnell said. 

He reminded senators that he was supportive of Trump using the country’s legal system, which handed the president and his team loss after loss. And pointed out that these cases were heard by some of the ‘all-star judges whom the president himself nominated’ – including on the U.S. Supreme Court. 

McConnell said that every election is plagued by some instances of vote irregularity. 

‘And of course that’s unacceptable,’ he said. 

The top Senate Republican also said he supported ‘strong state-led voting reforms,’ adding that he didn’t want to see ‘last year’s bizarre pandemic procedures’ – like mail-in ballots that gave Democrats an edge – ‘become the new norm.’  

‘But my colleagues nothing before us proves illegality anywhere near the massive scale, the massive scale that would have tipped the entire election,’ McConnell argued. ‘Nor can public doubt alone justify a radical break, when the doubt itself was incited without any evidence.’  

He pointed out that the Constitution gives Congress a ‘limited role.’ 

‘We simply can’t declare ourselves a national board of elections on steroids,’ McConnell said. 

Twisting the knife into Trump, McConnell also pointed out that the race between President-elect Joe Biden and Trump ‘was not unusually close.’ 

‘The Electoral College margin was almost idential to what it was in 2016,’ McConnell pointed out. 

‘If this election were overturned by mere allegations from the losing side our democracy would enter a death spiral,’ McConnel warned. ‘We’d never see a whole nation accept an election again.’ 

‘Every four years there would be a scramble for power at any cost,’ he added. ‘This will lead us down a poisonous path where only the winner accepts the result.’ 

McConnell also pointed out that the Republican Party has pushed to keep the Electoral College system, suggesting Wednesday’s shenanigans could further push Americans to wanting to get rid of it.   

‘Leaving many of our states without any real say at all in choosing a president,’ he said. 

Addressing his GOP peers, McConnell said, ‘Self goverment, my colleagues, requires a shared commitment to the truth and a shared respect for the ground rules of our system.’ 

‘We cannot keep drifting apart into two separate tribes with a separate set of facts and separate realities,’ he said. 

He also encouraged Republicans to be better than the Democrats, who previously challenged Electoral College votes in 2001, 2005 and 2017.  

‘Republican condemned those baseless effots,’ McConnell said. 

‘But we must not imitate and escalate what we repudiate,’ he argued. 

He said the Senate’s ‘duty is to govern for the public good.’ 

‘The United States has a higher calling than an endless spiral of partisan vengeance,’ he said.  

McConnell declared he would not be joining any of the objections Wednesday to challenge the count. 

At least 14 senators signed onto the effort, pressed by Trump. 

Democrats are standing firm against the objections. 

House Minority Leader Chuck Schumer – who is due for a promotion once the results in the two Georgia Senate run-off races become final – applauded McConnell’s efforts in his floor speech directly afterward. 

‘This insurrection was fortunately discouraged by the leadership of the majority party, but it was not quelled,’ Schumer said.  

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California Headline USA Politics

Mitch McConnell’s Kentucky home vandalized with ‘WERES MY MONEY’ spray painted on door

The Kentucky home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was vandalized just days after he refused to allow the upper chamber to vote on boosting stimulus checks to $2,000.

‘WERES MY MONEY’ was spray painted on the front door to McConnell’s home in the Highlands section of Louisville on Saturday.

On the window adjacent to the front porch, graffiti is seen which says: ‘MITCH KILLS THE POOR.’

The vandalism was first reported by WDRB-TV. 

A spokesperson for Louisville Metro Police Department told DailyMail.com that the incident happened at around 5:00am on Saturday.

Police said there was minor damage of graffiti on a window and a door. So far, no suspects have been identified and investigators continue to pursue leads. 

The spray painted message was found more than 24 hours after vandals struck the $5million San Francisco home of the second most powerful member of Congress, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Vandals spray painted ‘WERES MY MONEY’ on the front door of the Louisville, Kentucky, home of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. The above image is from Saturday

On the window adjacent to the front porch, graffiti is seen which says: ‘MITCH KILLS THE POOR’

On the window adjacent to the front porch, graffiti is seen which says: ‘MITCH KILLS THE POOR’

McConnell's home is located in the Highlands section of Louisville, Kentucky

McConnell’s home is located in the Highlands section of Louisville, Kentucky

McConnell on Saturday released a statement to the Louisville Courier Journal which read: 'Vandalism and the politics of fear have no place in our society. My wife and I have never been intimidated by this toxic playbook. We just hope our neighbors in Louisville aren’t too inconvenienced by this radical tantrum'

McConnell on Saturday released a statement to the Louisville Courier Journal which read: ‘Vandalism and the politics of fear have no place in our society. My wife and I have never been intimidated by this toxic playbook. We just hope our neighbors in Louisville aren’t too inconvenienced by this radical tantrum’ 

Pelosi’s home was vandalized in the early morning hours of New Year’s Day with a pig’s head surrounded in a pool of red paint, as well as a spray-painted message appearing to allude to the failed $2,000 stimulus checks.

Photos of the disturbing scene shared on social media by conservative filmmaker Maggie VandenBerghe on Friday showed the House Speaker’s white garage door defaced with black graffiti text reading: ‘$2k Cancel RENT! We want everything!’

McConnell on Saturday released a statement to the Louisville Courier Journal which read: ‘I’ve spent my career fighting for the First Amendment and defending peaceful protest. 

‘I appreciate every Kentuckian who has engaged in the democratic process whether they agree with me or not.

‘This is different.’

He continued: ‘Vandalism and the politics of fear have no place in our society.

‘My wife and I have never been intimidated by this toxic playbook. 

‘We just hope our neighbors in Louisville aren’t too inconvenienced by this radical tantrum.’  

According to TMZ, San Francisco Police had been called to the home on reports of vandalism at the property in the early hours of New Year’s Day.

Officers arrived around 3am and documented the incident in a report, but it is unclear if there are any suspects. DailyMail.com has reached out to the San Francisco Police Department for comment.

VandenBerghe, a self-proclaimed patriot and independent journalist that has been featured on conservative news outlets in the past, accused police in her post of trying to cover up the incident after the city reportedly called in the vandalism. 

Nancy Pelosi ’s San Francisco home has been vandalized with red paint, a pigs head and a spray painted message about $2,000 checks, according to TMZ

Nancy Pelosi ‘s San Francisco home has been vandalized with red paint, a pigs head and a spray painted message about $2,000 checks, according to TMZ

Police sources told the outlet that cops were called out to reports of vandalism at the House Speaker's property in the early hours of New Year's Day. Her home as it normally looks above

Police sources told the outlet that cops were called out to reports of vandalism at the House Speaker’s property in the early hours of New Year’s Day. Her home as it normally looks above

‘City called to clean up at 3am & police attempting to stop photos of scene. Media SILENT,’ she tweeted. 

The San Francisco mansion is located in the city’s swanky Pacific Heights neighborhood and counts as one of Pelosi’s several residences in California. 

The four-bedroom, three-bathroom house has an estimated worth of $5.4million, according to property records.

The home was also once the site of a small protest in September, when Pelosi came under fire for getting her hair styled at a local salon that had been closed under COVID-19 restrictions.

The Speaker of the House is yet to comment on the incident as of Friday evening.  

Pelosi has been calling for the second round of stimulus checks to be increased from $600 to $2,000 – an amount also proposed by Donald Trump.

But the efforts have so far fallen short with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday blocking the Democrats’ standalone bill to send the checks to Americans.   

McConnell told Pelosi the Senate won’t be ‘bullied’ into passing it, dashing hopes of the higher checks being sent out to Americans.  

San Francisco officers arrived on the scene around 3 a.m. and a police report was taken, TMZ said. Pelosi is seen above in Washington, DC, on Wednesday

San Francisco officers arrived on the scene around 3 a.m. and a police report was taken, TMZ said. Pelosi is seen above in Washington, DC, on Wednesday 

Pelosi had urged the Republican to allow the upper chamber to vote on the bill after it passed in the House through a bipartisan vote. 

‘The Democrats and Republicans in the House have passed that legislation. Who is holding up that distribution to the American people? Mitch McConnell and the Senate Republicans,’ she said Wednesday.

‘In blocking it, they are in denial of the hardship the American people are experiencing now, health wise, financially, and every way.’ 

But judging by the state of the garage door, some Americans are outraged with Pelosi over her efforts. 

This isn’t the first time the House Speaker’s home has been targeted. 

Back in September, a Youtuber appeared to defecate in the driveway of her home in a livestream video. 

In the footage, the man was seen walking through the streets of San Francisco in search of the Democrat’s home. 

Once he found her home, he set up a camera across the road and walked over to her driveway.   

Armando then saluted his viewers, pulled down his pants and proceeded to squat. 

After a few seconds, Armando stands to his feet and wipes his buttocks before walking away and leaving behind what appeared to be feces. 

‘That was for President Trump,’ Armando is heard telling his viewers.     

This isn't the first time the House Speaker's home has been targeted. Back in September, a Youtuber appeared to defecate in the driveway of her home in a livestream video

This isn’t the first time the House Speaker’s home has been targeted. Back in September, a Youtuber appeared to defecate in the driveway of her home in a livestream video 

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Headline USA Politics

Mitch McConnell calls certifying Biden win his ‘most consequential vote ever’

Mitch McConnell told fellow Senate Republicans that his vote to certify Joe Biden’s election victory will be the ‘most consequential’ of his political career, a new report claims. 

The Majority Leader made the declaration in a conference call on Thursday morning, according to Axios, which spoke to one person who was on the call and two who were briefed on its contents.  

‘I’m finishing 36 years in the Senate and I’ve cast a lot of big votes,’ one source paraphrased McConnell as saying. ‘And in my view, just my view, this will be the most consequential I have ever cast.’

He referred to the vote as a ‘vote of conscience’, the source said, adding: ‘The context was McConnell saying we’re being asked to overturn the results after a guy didn’t get as many electoral votes and lost by 7 million popular votes.’ 

The call came one day after Missouri Sen Josh Hawley voiced his support for a Trump-backed plan to object to certifying the Electoral College votes on January 6.  

McConnell and two other senators reportedly asked Hawley to explain what he plans to do at the certification vote during the call, but Hawley was not present.  

Mitch McConnell told fellow Senate Republicans that his vote to certify Joe Biden’s election victory will be the ‘most consequential’ of his political career on Thursday

Hawley on Wednesday announced that he would file objections alongside a group of House Republicans when Vice President Mike Pence goes through the Electoral College vote tallies next week. 

The process is a ceremonial one – but objections have been made in the past. 

The change this year is that President Donald Trump, who has refused to concede the election to President-elect Biden, is backing the effort, which could hold up the announcement of the final results by hours, even days. 

The president has asked his supporters to come rally in Washington, DC, as he continues to tweet conspiracy theories about widespread voter fraud. 

McConnell’s latest comments about the vote are likely to further infuriate Trump, who has been clinging to hope that the election is not yet over.  

Missouri Sen Josh Hawley (pictured) on Wednesday voiced his support for a Trump-backed plan to object to certifying the Electoral College votes on January 6

Missouri Sen Josh Hawley (pictured) on Wednesday voiced his support for a Trump-backed plan to object to certifying the Electoral College votes on January 6

Trump’s chances at overturning the results took yet another hit on Thursday as the Department of Justice came out to condemn a Republican-led lawsuit that aimed to reverse Biden’s Electoral College win by asking a judge to declare that Pence has the ‘exclusive authority and sole discretion’ to decide which votes should be counted. 

Pence was named as a defendant in the case – led by Texas Rep Louis Gohmert and 11 Arizona Republicans – which the DOJ called a ‘walking legal contradiction’. 

Top DOJ officials asked a judge to reject the plaintiffs’ request for an emergency injunction that would empower Pence to ignore the Electoral College votes from battleground states that handed the race to Biden.  

McConnell's refusal to contest the Electoral College results has infuriated President Donald Trump (pictured arriving at the White House with Melania on Thursday)

McConnell’s refusal to contest the Electoral College results has infuriated President Donald Trump (pictured arriving at the White House with Melania on Thursday)

Beyond Hawley, only a handful of Republican senators had expressed interest in objecting to state results on January 6, but just one senator needs to object to trigger two hours of debate in the House and Senate and then a vote for each state the lawmakers say they have a problem with. 

A simple majority vote is needed to overrule an objection.  

McConnell asked GOP senators not to engage in this effort because every one of his senators would have to go on-record and either dispute a state’s result – or vote against Trump, which could have repercussions down the line in the form of Trump-backed primary challengers in 2022. 

McConnell has already congratulated Biden for winning the election, doing so the day the Electoral College cast votes. 

He’s been joined by other moderate Republican senators, making Hawley’s efforts to contest certain states’ results doomed.    

Republican Sen Ben Sasse threw his support behind McConnell on Wednesday as he called out ‘institutional arsonist members of Congress’ for signing on to the plot. 

‘When we talk in private, I haven’t heard a single Congressional Republican allege that the election results were fraudulent – not one,’ Sasse wrote in a long Facebook post. 

‘Instead, I hear them talk about their worries about how they will “look” to President Trump’s most ardent supporters.’  

Republican Sen. Ben Sasse wrote a Facebook essay explaining why he would not be taking part in the Trump-led plot to object to Electoral College vote tallies in January 6 and called out his colleagues, saying none of them believe vote was 'fraudulent' behind closed doors

Republican Sen. Ben Sasse wrote a Facebook essay explaining why he would not be taking part in the Trump-led plot to object to Electoral College vote tallies in January 6 and called out his colleagues, saying none of them believe vote was ‘fraudulent’ behind closed doors 

Sasse, who’s been one of the few Republican Trump critics on Capitol Hill, laid out the Trump campaign’s court cases in each state and then explained why some reported instances of fraud or disparities would not flip the results. 

‘I started with the courts for a reason. From where I sit, the single-most telling fact is that there a giant gulf between what President Trump and his allies say in public – for example, on social media, or at press conferences outside Philadelphia landscaping companies and adult bookstores – and what President Trump’s lawyers actually say in courts of law,’ Sasse wrote. 

Sasse points out that while there’s no legal penalty for misleading the public, there is one for deceiving judges. 

‘[T]he president’s lawyers know that – and thus they have repeated almost none of the claims of grand voter fraud that the campaign spokespeople are screaming at their most zealous supporters,’ Sasse said. 

‘So, here’s the heart of this whole thing: this isn’t really a legal strategy – it’s a fundraising strategy,’ he added. 

Sasse wrote about what he believed his colleagues’ motivations were too. 

‘Let’s be clear what is happening here: We have a bunch of ambitious politicians who think there’s a quick way to tap into the president’s populist base without doing any real, long-term damage,’ Sasse said. ‘But they’re wrong – and this issue is bigger than anyone’s personal ambitions.’ 

‘Adults don’t point a loaded gun at the heart of legitimate self-government,’ he continued. 

‘All the clever arguments and rhetorical gymnastics in the world won’t change the fact that this January 6th effort is designed to disenfranchise millions of Americans simply because they voted for someone in a different party.’ 

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Mitch McConnell refuses to vote for $ 2,000 aid for the third time, calling it “socialism for the rich” | The State

Senate Leader Mitch McConnell.

Photo:
Alex Wong / Getty Images

For the third time, the Majority Leader in the Senate, Mitch McConnell (Kentucky), refused to put to a vote the increase in direct aid to families to $ 2,000 dollars, something that even qualified as “socialism for the rich”, leaving aside the fact that more than 14 million Americans have lost their jobs during the coronavirus pandemic.

“Borrowing our grandchildren to do socialism for the rich is a terrible way to get help for families who really need it,” McConnell said.

He accused the Democratic leaders, the Speaker of the House, Nancy pelosi (California), and the Senate Minority Leader, Charles schumer, of wanting to send thousands of dollars “to people who don’t need help.”

“The Washington Democrats took President Trump’s suggestion and diverted it so that the checks would benefit even more high-income households.”, he accused.

President Donald trump, in fact, he has insisted on increasing the aid check from $ 600 to $ 2,000, a proposal to which the Democrats joined, with the senator Bernie sanders (Vermont) as one of the emphatic voices in approval.

In an effort to move that bill forward, Schumer even said Democrats would allow a vote on tech companies’ liability on Section 230, which protects internet platforms over user-created content.

“Just let us vote on the bill passed by the House, and we can vote on any right-wing conspiracy theory you want,” the Democrat said.

Sanders stepped up his stance against McConnell for not allowing a vote on the aid increase.

“(This) goes beyond the battles of the people of Vermont or Kentucky and, let me make it clear to the Majority Leader, that 10 of the 25 poorest counties in the United States of America are located in Kentucky.”Sanders said.

Three topics for debate

The New York senator accused Schumer of linking the president’s three issues, that is, overriding President Trump’s veto on the law of Defense funds, the Section 230 and the stimulus check.

“Let’s be very clear: there is one way, and only one, to approve the $ 2,000 checks before the end of the year. And that is passing the House bill. It’s the only way for the American people to get the checks they need and deserve, ”claimed Schumer.

Republicans in favor

Republicans are divided on the aid increase, but among those who support they are integrated Marco Rubio (Florida) and Lindsey graham (South Carolina).

Even the Republican senators Kelly loeffler and David perdue They expressed their support for the payment, amid the special election contest in Georgia that could cause Republicans to lose a majority.

The discussion in the Senate is expected to continue, as the vote to override President Trump’s veto could occur in the early morning of January 1 or in an extraordinary vote on Saturday.

On Sunday 3 the new Congress is installed and the following week the validity of the presidential election is scheduled.

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Mitch McConnell AGAIN shuts down Democratic effort to get $2,000 stimulus checks passed

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell killed yet another Democratic effort to pass a stand alone bill that would increase stimulus checks to $2,000. 

In the opening minutes of the Senate’s New Year’s Eve session, McConnell objected after Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer tried to get a vote yet again. 

While President Donald Trump has pushed for the $2000 amount, McConnell characterized the checks as Congress giving ‘cash to high-earning households’ and said lawmakers needed to focus on ‘targeted relief’ to Americans suffering from the COVID-19 pandemic. 

‘Experts from across the political spectrum agree that our colleague from Vermont is dead wrong on this,’ McConnell said, aiming the comments at Sen. Bernie Sanders. ‘Socialism for rich people is a terrible way to help the American families that are actually struggling.’ 

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell crushed yet another Democratic effort to get a vote on a stand alone bill to increase COVID-19 stimulus checks to $2,000, something President Donald Trump and also progressive Sen. Bernie Sanders supports 

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer

Sen. Bernie Sanders

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (left) again tried to get a vote on a stand alone $2,000 checks bill Thursday morning, while Sen. Bernie Sanders railed against comments made by McConnell, who likened the bill to ‘socialism for rich people’ 

That whipped up Sanders, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist. 

‘I am delighted to hear the majority leader talking about socialism for the rich … so let me talk about the socialism for the rich that the majority leader is enthusiastically supportive of,’ Sanders began. 

The Vermont independent who twice ran for the Democratic presidential nomination pointed a finger at the Trump-backed tax bill that passed Congress in December 2017.  

‘Under that bill Charles Koch, one of the very richest people in America, he has a net worth of $113 billion, that bill gave Mr. Koch a $1.4 billion tax break,’ Sanders said. ‘Majority leader that sounds to me like socialism for the rich. Ahhh!’ 

The $2,000 stand alone bill passed in the House starts cutting that amount for Americans who make more than $75,000.   

Sanders and a small group of progressive Senate Democrats had wanted to delay the vote to overrule Trump’s veto of the National Defense Authorization Act to push McConnell on the $2,000 issue, but they were overruled by members of their own party who voted Wednesday night to start that process.  

Schumer and also Vice President-elect Kamala Harris voted in favor of the motion to proceed.  

Now proponents of the $2,000 checks are looking ahead to the new Congress, which starts on January 3 at noon.   

During a Thursday morning appearance on ‘Fox & Friends,’ Sen. Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican and top ally of Trump’s on Capitol Hill, said he supported the $2,000 checks measure and pushed McConnell to present a clean bill to the body after January 3. 

Sen. Lindsey Graham, one of the handful of Republicans who supports the $2,000 checks, said Thursday morning he wanted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to present a clean bill in the next Congress, which begins January 3

Sen. Lindsey Graham, one of the handful of Republicans who supports the $2,000 checks, said Thursday morning he wanted Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to present a clean bill in the next Congress, which begins January 3 

President Donald Trump, photographed leaving West Palm Beach, Florida Thursday, has pushed for the $2,000 check amount. He's backed it using Twitter, but has done nothing yet to force McConnell's hand

President Donald Trump, photographed leaving West Palm Beach, Florida Thursday, has pushed for the $2,000 check amount. He’s backed it using Twitter, but has done nothing yet to force McConnell’s hand 

‘Here’s what I’d like – I’d like a stand-alone vote in the new Congress on the $2,000 check,’ Graham said. ‘We have seven Republicans who’ve already said they would vote for it. We need five more. I think if we had the vote, we would get there.’ 

The Senate will use the remainder of the session to deliver Trump his first veto loss. 

The president had long promised to veto the huge defense bill, first over the inclusion of a provision to rename military bases named for Confederate figures.  

More recently, Trump threatened to veto the large piece of legislation if Congress didn’t retool section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which the president argued gives ‘big tech’ companies like Facebook and Twitter too much legal protection. 

McConnell had offered on Tuesday a bill that included the $2,000 provision, but also killed off section 230, while also creating an election commission – two Trump demands. 

That bill was a poison pill for Democrats, though Schumer said Thursday he’d support voting on each of those proposals individually.  

Trump was headed back to Washington, D.C., Thursday after spending Christmas at his Mar-a-Lago resort. 

He tweeted ‘$2000 ASAP!’ Wednesday morning, but has since dedicated his Twitterfeed to complaints about the election. 

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The pulse of McConnell and Trump that has the population without a check of $ 2,000 | The State

Senate Republican Majority Leader Mitch McConnell intensified his pulse with outgoing President Donald Trump on Wednesday by preventing a vote on his petition to increase direct aid to Americans and advance an initiative aimed at canceling for the first time his veto of a law.

Underneath this struggle lies a struggle to show their influence in the party, with Trump’s departure from the White House on view next January 20.

“There is no realistic way”

In a Senate speech, McConnell made it clear that he will not vote on Trump’s request to increase direct pay to every American from $ 600 to $ 2,000, a proposal that had been endorsed by Democrats and a growing number of members of the U.S. Republican Party.

McConnell announced that the proposal to extend those checks does not “have a realistic path to be approved in the Senate”, dominated by the conservatives.

With a new Congress taking office Jan.3, McConnell suggested the bill simply expire, even though it had already been approved by the Democratic-majority lower house.

More than a week ago, the two houses of Congress approved a stimulus package of $ 900,000 million dollars aimed at alleviating the deterioration of the economy due to the pandemic and that included direct payments of $ 600 dollars to all Americans with a lower annual income at $ 75,000.

For five days, Trump resisted ratifying the stimulus package, although on Sunday night he backtracked and agreed to sign it on the condition that aid for Americans be increased to $ 2,000.

Cheating Democrats

Right away, the Democrats picked up the gauntlet and on Monday approved that increase in the House of Representatives; But, on Tuesday, McConnell fought back and outlined his strategy based on his power, as leader of the Senate, to decide which initiatives are put to the vote or not.

Specifically, the Republican linked the legislative project to increase payments to citizens with another initiative to end the so-called “Section 230”, which protects internet giants like Twitter and Facebook from any legal consequences for what third parties post on their websites.

In addition, he included in that package another law to create a commission to study the November 3 elections, in which Democrat Joe Biden won, but whose victory Trump does not recognize when he alleges, without proof, that there was fraud.

By linking those initiatives, which Trump strongly supports, McConnell set the Democrats a trap and, in practice, it buried the initiative.

“Due to this pandemic and our massive response, for the first time since World War II, we now have a national debt that is larger than our economy,” McConnell lamented.

The end of the republican identity

In his speech, McConnell made several allusions to the ideas of fiscal discipline and control of public spending that historically were part of the essence of the Republican Party until the arrival of Trump, which has promoted greater investments by the Government.

The Republican Party faces the challenge of defining its identity once the president leaves the White House on January 20 and some of its members are betting on returning to those ideas of fiscal discipline.

In addition, referring to ideas of patriotism, the majority of Republican senators took a new step on Wednesday to override Trump’s veto on the annual defense budget law valued at $ 741,000 million of dollars.

With 80 votes in favor and 12 against, the Senate passed a procedural step that was necessary to begin the debate aimed at invalidating the presidential initiative, so that the final vote could take place on Friday, New Year’s Day, or Saturday.

The Lower House, dominated by Democrats, already voted in favor of the initiative on Monday and now it only remains for the Senate to give the go-ahead.

An annulment of the veto by Congress would be a serious setback for Trump in the last days of his presidency, which ends on January 20, 2021. It would also be the first time that it has occurred since he arrived at the White House almost ago. four years.

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Coronavirus Relief Bill US: McConnell tries to block $2,000 checks

Mitch McConnell on Wednesday shot down another attempt by Democrats to pass a standalone bill that would send $2,000 stimulus checks to Americans, saying the Senate won’t be ‘bullied’ into passing it.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer attempted to bring up a bill passed by Speaker Nancy Pelosi that will increase the $600 checks already approved to the $2,000 amount that President Donald Trump requested. 

McConnell objected, stopping the legislation in its tracks, and, instead, touted his own legislation, which has little chance at passing.

The continued clash decreases the chances for Americans to see larger stimulus checks as the economy continues to struggle during the coronavirus pandemic.  

McConnell used the president as his excuse, arguing the Democratic bill doesn’t meet with Trump’s request. Along with tripling the check amount, President Trump also wants a repeal of section 230 of tech law and an investigation of election fraud – neither of which is in Pelosi’s bill but is in one McConnell proposed. 

‘The Senate is not going to be bullied,’ McConnell said in remarks on the Senate floor, adding: ‘The Senate is not going to split apart the three issues Trump linked together just because Democrats are afraid to address two of them.’

Mitch McConnell on Wednesday shot down another attempt by Democrats to pass a standalone bill that would send $2,000 stimulus checks to Americans, saying the Senate won’t be ‘bullied’ into passing it.

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer attempted to bring up a standalone bill to increase the check amounts to $2,000 but McConnell shot it down

Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer attempted to bring up a standalone bill to increase the check amounts to $2,000 but McConnell shot it down

The House bill pushed by Democrats ‘does not align with what President Trump has suggested,’ McConnell said. ‘And which has no realistic path to quickly pass the Senate.’

But while McConnell was clear Democrats’ standalone bill has no chance of passing the Senate, his combo legislation has no chance either given the objections to a full repeal of section 230 (most lawmakers want to simply amend that section of law) and Democrats’ refusal to support a probe of the election. 

‘There is no other game in town besides the House bill,’ Schumer said in his remarks on the Senate floor, arguing McConnell’s bill has too much ‘partisan policy’ to pass.

The clock is ticking for the Senate. Congress adjourns for this session on January 3. Any legislation not passed is dead and the process must start a new on January 4th.

McConnell instead turned his attention to the National Defense Authorization Act.  

He attacked Senator Bernie Sanders for the senator’s threat to hold up a vote to override President Donald Trump’s veto of the must-pass defense bill, which funds the Pentagon. The House has already voted to override the veto and the Senate needs to do the same for the defense legislation to become law.

‘Our colleague says he will slow down this vital bill unless he gets to muscle through another standalone proposal from Speaker Pelosi that would add roughly half a trillion dollars to the national debt,’ McConnell said of Sanders’ efforts.

Sanders vowed not to let the Senate vote on the veto override until it addresses the stimulus checks. He can hold up the process until New Year’s Day, at which point the Senate could vote. McConnell has the votes to override the veto and wants to get the matter taken care of.

Sanders also took to the Senate floor to plead for passage of the standalone House bill for the $2,000 stimulus check. Standing before a poster featuring President Trump’s tweet from Wednesday morning – ‘$2,000 ASAP!’ – Sanders said that: ‘On this issue, amazingly enough, the president of the United States is right.’

He also went after McConnell, pointing out the high poverty numbers in his home state of Kentucky. 

‘Let me just make it clear for the majority leader, that 10 out of the poorest 25 counties in the United States of America are located in Kentucky. So maybe my colleague, the majority leader, might want to get on the phone and start talking to working families in Kentucky and find out how they feel about the need for immediate help in terms of a $2,000 check,’ he said.

Senator Bernie Sanders took to the Senate floor to plead for the check amount to be increased

Senator Bernie Sanders took to the Senate floor to plead for the check amount to be increased

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is putting pressure on Republicans to pass the House bill

Speaker Nancy Pelosi is putting pressure on Republicans to pass the House bill

In addition to Trump’s tweets, Democrats have been piling on the pressure, urging the Senate to move quickly on the matter. 

‘In blocking it, they are in denial of the hardship the American people are experiencing now, health wise, financially, and every way,’ Speaker Pelosi said at a press conference Wednesday. 

But the Democrats effort came to not. Republican objections kept the standalone bill for $2,000 checks from being voted on.

Even as the debate continues over the next legislative steps, the $600 payments included in the $900 billion coronavirus relief package will start appearing in Americans’ bank accounts as early as next week.

McConnell proposed a bill Tuesday evening that couples the increased payments with a full repeal of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and the creation of an election fraud panel to probe the 2020 presidential election.

All three actions have been pushed by Trump.

The Senate majority leader knows, however, that he is proposing a ‘poison pill’ that is doomed for failure.

The bill would also need to go to the House, which is no longer in session, for approval before going to the president’s desk.

McConnell, and most other Republicans in the Senate, don’t want another few hundred million tacked onto the national deficit in increasing the already approved $600 direct checks three-fold.

President Donald Trump supports tripling the payments, tweeting Wednesday morning: '$2000 ASAP!'

President Donald Trump supports tripling the payments, tweeting Wednesday morning: ‘$2000 ASAP!’

Trump signed on Sunday the first COVID-19 relief bill since March, which includes another round of payments for most Americans struggling in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic. By doing so, he also avoided forcing a government shutdown as the relief was included in the latest government funding bill.

The president, however, demanded that the checks be upped to $2,000, as well as insisting that foreign spending be cut.

The Democrat-controlled House passed a standalone bill on Monday to increase the payments to the president’s requested amount – and also struck down Trump’s veto of the ‘vital’ NDAA to fund the Pentagon through the year.

As the Senate debates the check amounts, possibly through New Year’s Day, the $600 payments will already be showing up in Americans’ bank accounts as early as Wednesday, January 6.

This is the same day Congress will meet in a joint session to certify the 2020 election for Joe Biden. 

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Mitch McConnell Blocks Democrats’ Attempt to Approve $ 2,000 Per Person Check | The State

Republican leader Mitch McConnell.

Photo:
Stefani Reynolds / Getty Images

The leader of the Senate, Mitch McConnell (Kentucky), blocked the minority leader’s proposal Charles schumer (New York), to approve the increase to $ 2,000 of the stimulus check to each American.

Although the Republican said that this issue will be addressed, he opposed the first attempt by Democrats to endorse the bill approved in the House of Representatives and supported by the president. Donald trump.

“There is a big difference between saying you support $ 2,000 checks and fighting to make it law.”Schumer said. “The House bill is the only way to deliver these stimulus packages before the end of the session. Will Republicans in the Senate oppose the House of Representatives, the Democratic majority in the Senate and the chairman of their own party to prevent these $ 2,000 checks from going forward?

McConnell responded to his opposition without giving reason.

The senator Bernie sanders (Vermont) also asked to pass the bill, but again the Republican leader objected.

McConnell said the stimulus payments plan would be considered, but alongside other demands by President Donald Trump, such as protections for tech companies.

“This week the Senate will begin a process to address these three priorities,” McConnell said.

In addition, the vote on President Trump’s veto of military funds is scheduled for this Wednesday, when the issue of the aid check could be a bargaining chip, as the Democrats advanced.

The senator Kirsten gillibrand (New York) also joined the approval of the aid increase and affirms that there are Republican senators who support the motion.

“Along with all Senate Democrats, several Republican senators support these emergency checks, which will provide a crucial lifeline for millions of American families,” he said. “Leader McConnell must end the obstruction and let the Senate vote to deliver this much-needed relief to American families.”

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