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Entertainment USA

Katie Couric faces backlash from Jeopardy’s ‘conservative’ audience over ‘cult of Trump’ comments

Katie Couric recently sounded off on Donald Trump’s impeachment and Twitter ban, before the one-term president left office.

And the acclaimed journalist is now facing backlash from the mostly ‘conservative’ audience of Jeopardy!, ahead of her guest hosting gig.

It came after she appeared on the first 2021 episode of Real Time with Bill Maher last week, where they discussed extremist beliefs in Congress, following the riot at the Capitol earlier this month.

Candid response: Katie Couric recently sounded off on Donald Trump’s impeachment and Twitter ban, before the one-term, twice-impeached president left office (pictured in February, 2020)

Conservative backlash: And the acclaimed journalist is now facing backlash from the mostly 'conservative' audience of Jeopardy!, ahead of her guest hosting gig (Alex Trebek pictured in January, 2021)

Conservative backlash: And the acclaimed journalist is now facing backlash from the mostly ‘conservative’ audience of Jeopardy!, ahead of her guest hosting gig (Alex Trebek pictured in January, 2021)

The 64-year-old told Maher: ‘It’s really bizarre, isn’t it, when you think about how AWOL so many of these members of Congress have gotten. 

‘But I also think some of them are believing the garbage that they are being fed 24/7 on the internet, by their constituents, and they bought into this big lie.’

She continued: ‘And the question is how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump.’

Couric’s comments have reportedly worried the producers of Jeopardy!, where she’s preparing for a week-long guest hosting gig, making her the first woman to lead the game show.

Extremism in Congress: It came after she appeared on the first 2021 episode of Real Time with Bill Maher last week, where they discussed extremist beliefs in Congress, following the riot of Trump supporters at the Capitol earlier this month

Extremism in Congress: It came after she appeared on the first 2021 episode of Real Time with Bill Maher last week, where they discussed extremist beliefs in Congress, following the riot of Trump supporters at the Capitol earlier this month 

Cult of Trump: The 64-year-old said: 'And the question is how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump' (pictured in February, 2020)

Cult of Trump: The 64-year-old said: ‘And the question is how are we going to really almost deprogram these people who have signed up for the cult of Trump’ (pictured in February, 2020)

Cause for concern: A source told Page Six: 'Katie's comments so soon after she was announced as a host are very concerning to the producers. They are worried there will be a backlash against her. There has already been some complaints' (pictured in April, 2019)

Cause for concern: A source told Page Six: ‘Katie’s comments so soon after she was announced as a host are very concerning to the producers. They are worried there will be a backlash against her. There has already been some complaints’ (pictured in April, 2019)

With an audience whose average age is 64.2 years old, the demographic has traditionally skewed conservative, and the show has made an effort to avoid politics.

A source told Page Six: ‘Katie’s comments so soon after she was announced as a host are very concerning to the producers. They are worried there will be a backlash against her. There has already been some complaints.

‘Jeopardy viewers are quite a traditional bunch, and there’s fears she might be too polarizing after this. At the very least, she already appears to have ruled herself out of becoming the permanent host of the show.’      

Fox News contributor Joe Concha, who’s firmly positioned himself against ‘cancel culture’, has recently spoken out against Couric.

He argued: ‘This sort of rhetoric from Couric — which comes across as so condescending and elitist — underscores the divide between our media, which primarily resides in New York and Washington, and the rest of the country, which is moderate to center-right per multiple polls. And it’s why the industry is so mistrusted and frowned upon.’

Following the death of beloved host Alex Trebek back in November, the show is taking on a series of guest hosts, including Mayim Bialik and Aaron Rodgers.   

Trebek has commented on the need to be unoffensive in the past, telling Vulture in November of 2018: ‘But one reason why a host can succeed for a long time is by not offending. You saw it with Johnny Carson. He was bright enough to cover almost any potentially offensive moment with his wit.’

Sage advice: Trebek has commented on the need to be unoffensive in the past, telling Vulture in November of 2018: 'But one reason why a host can succeed for a long time is by not offending'

Sage advice: Trebek has commented on the need to be unoffensive in the past, telling Vulture in November of 2018: ‘But one reason why a host can succeed for a long time is by not offending’

Going for gold: Ken Jennings, 46, the record-holder for the show's longest winning streak, has also been serving as a guest host on Jeopardy!, and he's the rumored frontrunner to permanently fill the position

Going for gold: Ken Jennings, 46, the record-holder for the show’s longest winning streak, has also been serving as a guest host on Jeopardy!, and he’s the rumored frontrunner to permanently fill the position

Public apology: He previously took to Twitter with an ambiguous apology for past statements that might have offended his followers, which some took for a smart move in securing his spot on the show (pictured in January, 2020)

Public apology: He previously took to Twitter with an ambiguous apology for past statements that might have offended his followers, which some took for a smart move in securing his spot on the show (pictured in January, 2020)

Diva behavior: The Page Six source added: 'Ken Jennings apologizes for a tweet he posted nearly four years ago, weeks before hosting Jeopardy! Katie will be under huge pressure to apologize also. Time will tell if she does, but Jeopardy! producers are expecting her to be a diva about it' (pictured in March, 2019)

Diva behavior: The Page Six source added: ‘Ken Jennings apologizes for a tweet he posted nearly four years ago, weeks before hosting Jeopardy! Katie will be under huge pressure to apologize also. Time will tell if she does, but Jeopardy! producers are expecting her to be a diva about it’ (pictured in March, 2019)

Granted, he made his opinion about Trump known in the same interview: ‘I wouldn’t say that [Trump] makes jokes. He picks on people.’

The Canadian gem also theorized on Trump’s chances as a contestant: ‘He might not agree that any of the correct responses are correct.’

Ken Jennings, 46, the record-holder for the show’s longest winning streak, has also been serving as a guest host on Jeopardy!, and he’s the rumored frontrunner to permanently fill the position. 

He previously took to Twitter with an ambiguous apology for past statements that might have offended his followers, which some took for a smart move in securing his spot on the show.

The Planet Funny author has been known to make a joke or two about Trump, including once after comedienne Kathy Griffin posed for a now infamous 2017 photo with a fake severed head featuring the disgraced president’s likeness.

Jennings jokingly commented about reports that Trump’s youngest son Barron, now 14, saw the photo and thought it was real: ‘Barron saw a very long necktie and a heap of expired deli meat in a dumpster. He thought it was his dad & his little heart is breaking.’ 

The Page Six source added: ‘Ken Jennings apologizes for a tweet he posted nearly four years ago, weeks before hosting Jeopardy! Katie will be under huge pressure to apologize also. Time will tell if she does, but Jeopardy! producers are expecting her to be a diva about it.’

Celeb guests: Following the death of beloved host Alex Trebek back in November, the show is taking on a series of guest hosts, including Mayim Bialik and Aaron Rodgers (Bialik pictured in May, 2019)

Celeb guests: Following the death of beloved host Alex Trebek back in November, the show is taking on a series of guest hosts, including Mayim Bialik and Aaron Rodgers (Bialik pictured in May, 2019)

Categories
Headline USA

Sarah Kohan breaks the silence and faces the rumors of infidelity once and for all | The State


The model has been blunt and says: “I have never been with another person physically or emotionally since I met Javier.”

Categories
Headline USA

The terrible illness Allison Lozz faces and the time she has left to completely lose her sight | The State

Years ago Allisson lozz he withdrew from the spotlight. From one moment to another he decided to leave the stage, get married, have daughters and dedicate himself full time to his family, but he returned to the public eye after revealing through social networks that he suffers from a rare disease.

Thanks to the fact that he maintains interaction with his fans, it is with them that he went to tell that he is dealing with overweight problems, something he is working on and the results have been given. However, because it has hypothyroidism it is difficult for him to support himself.

“It’s a side effect, I have hypothyroidism, I struggle a lot with it, so I’m happy,” shared Allison.

But hypothyroidism is not the only health problem she faces, as she also confessed that she could go blind and an operation is not a guarantee that she will recover her vision completely. The specialists who treated her told her that when she reaches 30 years old, she may suffer total loss of sight.

Unfortunately this prognosis would occur in the next two years, since Allison is now 28, although she does not lose hope that medical science will soon advance and give her a better quality of life due to both diseases.

Despite all the bad things that the former actress has suffered, this has not been an impediment to her success, because the achievements she has made as a businesswoman and as a mother have given her a full life that she would never change for acting.

Keep reading: Leticia Calderón is hospitalized in an emergency due to complications from Covid-19

Categories
Canada

Indiana family faces deportation for having too many children

An American family in Schererville, northern Indiana, is at risk of being evicted from their home for having too many children.

The couple with two children took possession of the premises in 2017 with a lease stipulating that a maximum of two people could sleep in each of the two bedrooms of the condo.

However, the family has grown in the meantime with two more babies and is threatened with eviction, despite being up to date with the rent payment.

These are the two babies who put the family in violation of the terms of the lease, CBS reported Wednesday.

“The police have never been here. I didn’t do anything wrong, apart from having two more babies, ”mother Deborah Rangel told American media.

Rangel’s family has been given a one-month deadline, who lost their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic that did not spare Indiana.

This US state did not extend the moratorium on evictions despite the health crisis.

Categories
Delhi The Buzz

While shooting in Punjab, actor Janhvi Kapoor faces farmers’ protest


Fatehgarh Sahib, January 14

Shooting of actor Janhvi Kapoor’s film “Good Luck Jerry” briefly came to a halt in Bassi Pathana here, after a group of farmers insisted that she make a comment on the ongoing farmers’ protest.

Kapoor is shooting for the film, produced by filmmaker Anand L Rai’s Colour Yellow Productions and directed by Sidharth Sengupta, in Punjab.

According to Sukhminder Singh Chauhan, DSP, Bassi Pathana, the incident happened on Monday after 20-30 farmers reached the movie sets for a “peaceful” protest.

“The shooting had stopped for two-three hours on January 11. There wasn’t anything major. Around 20-30 people had reached the set. It was a peaceful agitation.

“All they wanted was assurance of support from them (the actors). When they did, the shoot was resumed. It was mutually resolved. Now the shoot is going on smoothly,” Chauhan told PTI on Wednesday.

On Monday, the “Dhadak” actor shared an Instagram Story in support of the farmers. Unlike other posts, Instagram Stories disappear after 24 hours from the time they are published.

“Farmers are at the heart of our country. I recognise and value the role that they play in feeding our nation. I hope a resolution is reached soon that benefits the farmers,” Kapoor had written.

Braving the cold and rains, thousands of farmers, mainly from Punjab and Haryana, have been camping at several Delhi border points, demanding a complete repeal of the three farm laws and legal guarantee of minimum support price (MSP) for their crops.

 Enacted in September last year, the three laws have been projected by the Centre as major reforms in the agriculture sector that will remove middlemen and allow farmers to sell their produce anywhere in the country.

 However, the protesting farmers have expressed their apprehension that the new laws would pave the way for eliminating the safety cushion of the MSP and do away with the “mandi” (wholesale market) system, leaving them at the mercy of big corporates.

Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered a stay of the implementation of the three new farm laws hoping this will end the prolonged protests by the farmers and also constituted a four-member panel of agriculture experts to resolve the impasse between their leaders and the Centre. PTI





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Entertainment USA Headline USA Politics

WikiLeaks founder could walk free TODAY as he faces bail hearing

Julian Assange will discover today if he will become a free man after almost 10 years of prison and self-imposed confinement after his dramatic legal victory against the US bid to extradite him. 

US officials were left ‘extremely disappointed’ after a British judge ruled on Monday that the WikiLeaks founder cannot be extradited to face spying charges due to the risk of him taking his own life in an American jail.

The US government has given notice that it will appeal against the decision and has two weeks to lodge grounds, while Assange has been remanded in custody at HMP Belmarsh ahead of his bail application today. 

Stella Moris – with whom he shares two young sons – was seen arriving at this morning’s hearing at Westminster Magistrates Court alongside two senior WikiLeaks employees. 

Ms Moris, who fell in love with Assange while she was his lawyer, said outside the Old Bailey on Monday: ‘Today is a victory for Julian. Today’s victory is a first step towards justice in this case.’

She also issued a direct appeal to Donald Trump, which references President Ronald Reagan’s 1987 appeal to Soviet lead Mikhail Gorbachev to ‘tear down’ the Berlin Wall. 

‘Mr President tear down these prison walls,’ she said. ‘Let our little boys have their father. Free Julian. Free the press.’

Julian Assange’s partner, Stella Moris, is seen arriving at this morning’s hearing at Westminster Magistrates Court with Wikileaks spokesman Kristinn Hrafnsson, left, and Joseph A Farrell, an ambassador for the organisation 

On Monday, Assange won his legal battle against US officials who wanted to put him on trial for helping hack government computers and violating an espionage law by releasing confidential cables (he is seen in a court sketch)

On Monday, Assange won his legal battle against US officials who wanted to put him on trial for helping hack government computers and violating an espionage law by releasing confidential cables (he is seen in a court sketch) 

A prison van arrives at the Westminster Magistrates Court this morning ahead of Assange's bail application hearing, as photographers try to picture Assange inside

A prison van arrives at the Westminster Magistrates Court this morning ahead of Assange’s bail application hearing, as photographers try to picture Assange inside 

Assange’s defence team, including celebrity barrister Jennifer Robinson, will be in court for today’s hearing. If they successful, their client could be a free man immediately afterwards.

However, this is thought to be unlikely given the US government’s pending appeal. 

Had Assange been convicted in the US, he would have been held in isolation at the notorious Supermax jail in Colorado, which has been described by a former warden as a ‘clean version of hell’ and a ‘fate worse than death’.

Judge Vanessa Baraitser said there was an ‘unmanageable high risk’ of Assange taking his own life if he was housed amid the grim conditions as she revealed he has autism, Asperger’s and a severe depressive disorder.

She accepted the evidence of medical experts who revealed that Assange had spoken openly about suicide while in Belmarsh and had prepared for it by writing a will. A razor blade was also found in his cell.

‘This is a victory for Julian’: How Assange’s partner Stella Moris greeted Monday’s verdict

Ms Moris, who fell in love with Assange while she was his lawyer, said outside the Old Bailey: ‘I had hoped today would be the day Julian would come home. Today is not that day but that day will come soon.

‘As long as Julian has to endure suffering in isolation as an unconvicted prisoner at Belmarsh prison, as long as our children continue to be robbed of their father’s love and affection, we cannot celebrate.

‘We will celebrate the day he comes home. 

‘Today is a victory for Julian. Today’s victory is a first step towards justice in this case.

‘On behalf of Julian and myself, I want to thank the millions of people around the world and the institutions that are already calling for this persecution to end.

‘I ask you all to shout louder, you lobby harder, until he is free. I call on everyone else to come together to defend Julian’s rights; not just Julian’s rights, they are your rights too. Julian’s freedom is coupled to all our freedoms and our freedoms are lost in the blink of an eye.

‘I call on insiders to come forward to expose the full extent of the misconduct that has led to Julian’s imprisonment. And I call on the president of the United States to end this now.

‘Mr President, tear down these prison walls. Let our little boys have their father. Free Julian, free the press, free us all.’ 

Mexico offered political asylum to Mr Assange earlier this week. The country’s president Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said: ‘I’m going to ask the foreign minister to carry out the relevant procedures to request that the UK government releases Mr Assange and that Mexico offers him political asylum.’

He said Mexico would ensure ‘that whoever receives asylum does not intervene or interfere in the political affairs of any country.’ 

The country has previously offered political asylum to high-profile international figures such as former Bolivian president Evo Morales. 

Meanwhile, the Australian Prime Minister said Assange can remain a free man if he chooses to return to his native country when his legal battle is over.  

Scott Morrison avoided passing judgement on the decision but said Assange would be able to travel home if he his freed.

‘I note the decision overnight and like any other Australian I understand that’s subject to appeal… assuming that all turns out, he’s like any other Australian, he’s free to return home to Australia if he wishes,’ Mr Morrison told 3AW radio.

‘Consular support has been offered to Assange… it’s a matter for him [if he returns] when proceedings and processes end,’ the prime minister added. 

On Monday, Assange’s supporters were overjoyed at the decision not to extradite him to the US but expressed dismay that the ruling was made on health grounds rather than in defence of freedom of expression.

The activist has been backed by a raft of celebrities including Pamela Anderson, artist Al Weiwei and designer Dame Vivienne Westwood.

Assange’s mother, Christine urged the US not to appeal, saying her son had suffered enough.

She tweeted after Monday’s ruling: ‘UK Judge Vanessa Baraitser ruled against extraditing my son Julian to the US on medical grounds.

‘US prosecutors state they will appeal. I implore Pres Trump & Pres elect Biden to order them to stand down. The decade long process was the punishment. He has suffered enough.’

Conservative MP David Davis said: ‘Good news Julian Assange’s extradition has been blocked. Extradition treaties should not be used for political prosecutions.’

Jeremy Corbyn, whose brother, Piers, was outside the Old Bailey on Monday, said: ‘Good news that the extradition of Julian Assange has been refused – my congratulations to him and his legal team. Extradition would be an attack on press freedom.

‘And it is alarming that the judge has accepted US government arguments threatening freedom of speech and freedom to publish. There remains much at stake in his case, which is being observed by so many around the world. Assange should be released.’

Assange, 49, faced an 18-count indictment, alleging a plot to hack computers and a conspiracy to obtain and disclose national defence information

Assange, 49, faced an 18-count indictment, alleging a plot to hack computers and a conspiracy to obtain and disclose national defence information 

A large crowd is now gathered outside the court today, with several police officers urging people to adhere to social distancing rules

A large crowd is now gathered outside the court today, with several police officers urging people to adhere to social distancing rules

Moris, with whom Assange shares two young sons, speaks to the media outside the Old Bailey in London on Monday

Moris, with whom Assange shares two young sons, speaks to the media outside the Old Bailey in London on Monday

How Assange is being defended by celebrity lawyer Jennifer Robinson – while judge overseeing case extradited Sarkozy fraud suspect

Jennifer Robinson, a key member of Assange’s defence team, is the go-to barrister for the rich and famous, most recently walking hand in hand with actress Amber Heard in her showdown against her ex-husband Johnny Depp in his acrimonious libel trial.

She counts the Hollywood elite among her inner circle, travelling to George and Amal Clooney’s wedding on a speedboat with actor Bill Murray.

A self-confessed Kyle Minogue fan, who has ‘nothing in her fridge but Champagne’ , the human rights lawyer once set headlines alight after she was spotted canoodling with Jeremy Corbyn’s former spin doctor, Seumas Milne.

Australian human rights lawyer Jennifer Robinson (left) with Assange's partner Stella Moris (right) at an earlier Old Bailey hearing

Australian human rights lawyer Jennifer Robinson (left) with Assange’s partner Stella Moris (right) at an earlier Old Bailey hearing

Ms Robinson and Mr Milne – a then-married father-of-two – were photographed in a passionate embrace on the terrace of the Courthouse hotel in East London in 2017. The 39-year-old, who came from humble beginnings in Australia, has been known to use her social media as an outlet to criticise the Tories on their human rights record and tweet support for Corbyn.

Less is known about Vanessa Baraitser, the district judge overseeing Assange’s case. 

She appears to be a specialist in extradition cases and last year gave the go ahead for an associate of former French president Nicolas Sarkozy to be returned to France for trial. 

Alexandre Djouhri, who was arrested at Heathrow last year after arriving on a flight from his Swiss home, and is accused by French prosecutors of nine offences relating to money laundering and corruption. These are alleged to have been committed in circumstances connected to Mr Sarkozy’s 2007 presidential campaign.   

District Judge Vanessa Baraitser delivering her verdict on Monday

District Judge Vanessa Baraitser delivering her verdict on Monday

The journalist Glenn Greenwald added a note of caution, saying the judge had endorsed most of the arguments put forward by the US in favour of extradition – including dismissing the idea that it was an attack on freedom of speech.

He said: ‘This wasn’t a victory for press freedom. Quite the contrary: the judge made clear she believed there are grounds to prosecute Assange in connection with the 2010 publication. It was, instead, an indictment of the insanely oppressive US prison system for security ‘threats.’

Meanwhile, Edward Snowden – the whistleblower who worked with Wikileaks and is currently living in Russia after leaking U.S. surveillance secrets – called for an end to the proceedings, tweeting: ‘Let this be the end of it.’

Amnesty International tweeted: ‘We welcome the fact that Julian Assange will not be sent to the USA, but this does not absolve the UK from having engaged in this politically-motivated process at the behest of the USA and putting media freedom and freedom of expression on trial.’

Judge Baraitser ruled that Assange risked being held under Special Administrative Measures (Sams), which would have seen him in solitary confinement with limited access to family and only two phone calls per month.

She said: ‘Faced with the conditions of near total isolation without the protective factors which limited his risk at HMP Belmarsh, I am satisfied the procedures described by the US will not prevent Mr Assange from finding a way to commit suicide and for this reason I have decided extradition would be oppressive by reason of mental harm and I order his discharge.

‘Despite his lighter spirit at times, he’s a depressed and sometimes despairing man who is genuinely fearful of his future. He represents an unmanageable high risk of suicide, both in Belmarsh and the US.’

She revealed that in 1991 Mr Assange had tried to take his own life and that there was a history of depression in the family.

His maternal grandmother and uncle both died by suicide, and Assange phoned the Samaritans most nights while in jail.

Australian-born Assange had been charged under the US’s 1917 Espionage Act for conspiring with Chelsea Manning, a former Army intelligence analyst, to hack into a Pentagon computer network and publish secret documents related to ‘national defence.’

The WikiLeaks founder faced a total of 18 charges and was also accused of putting the lives of US informants at risk by publishing the material.

Assange has been locked in a bitter dispute with US authorities since July 2010 when WikiLeaks started publishing hundreds of thousands of classified US military and political documents from the Afghan and Iraq wars.

As US officials pursued him through the British courts, in June 2012, Assange entered the Ecuadorian embassy, requesting political asylum, which was granted two months later.

Assange remained holed up at the embassy until April 2019 when Ecuador revoked his asylum status, leading to his arrest and kickstarting a legal battle that culminated in Monday’s judgment.

During his time in the embassy, the WikiLeaks founder fathered two children with his partner Stella Morris.

For the past 19 months, Assange has been held at Belmarsh top security jail.

He first appeared at the Old Bailey last February, but the case was pushed back because of the coronavirus pandemic.

If Assange had stood trial in the US, he faced a possible 175 years in prison if convicted of all charges.

The controversial WikiLeaks founder has attracted a number of high-profile supporters including Pamela Anderson and Nobel Peace Prize winner Adolfo Perez Esquivel, who visited him at the Ecuadorian embassy.

Others to have lent their support include the artist Al Weiwei and designer Dame Vivienne Westwood.

Assange was represented at his Old Bailey trial last year by eminent lawyer Jennifer Robinson.

The court head extraordinary details of the lengths US authorities were prepared to go to ensure that Assange stood trial in the country.

Stella Moris, the mother of Julian Assange's children, Max and Gabriel (pictured left and right) this weekend said Britain 'would no longer be a haven for free speech' if he was extradited

Stella Moris, the mother of Julian Assange’s children, Max and Gabriel (pictured left and right) this weekend said Britain ‘would no longer be a haven for free speech’ if he was extradited

This included hiring a US security contractor to bug Assange’s meetings in the Ecuadorian embassy and even a possible kidnap or poison plot to end the stalemate.

Judge Baraitser heard that if convicted, Assange faced the prospect of being held in a Supermax ADX facility in Colorado, where convicted terrorist Abu Hamza has been housed under Sams in solitary confinement.

Psychiatrists for the defence said Assange had suffered from severe depression and was a high suicide risk.

But lawyers for the US Government claimed that the prospect of Assange being held under Sams was ‘speculative’ and the sentence was likely to be much lower.

Chelsea Manning had been sentenced to 35 years over her role in leaking classified material but was given clemency after seven years.

However, she was jailed again for contempt in 2019 and fined for refusing to testify in court about Assange.

Timeline: WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange’s long legal battle 

2006

Assange creates Wikileaks with a group of like-minded activists and IT experts to provide a secure way for whistleblowers to leak information. He quickly becomes its figurehead and a lightning rod for criticism.

2010

March: U.S. authorities allege Assange engaged in a conspiracy to hack a classified U.S. government computer with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning. 

July: Wikileaks starts releasing tens of thousands of top secrets documents, including a video of U.S. helicopter pilots gunning down 12 civilians in Baghdad in 2007.  What followed was the release of more than 90,000 classified US military files from the Afghan war and 400,000 from Iraq that included the names of informants. 

August: Two Swedish women claim that they each had consensual sex with Assange in separate instances when he was on a 10-day trip to Stockholm. They allege the sex became non-consensual when Assange refused to wear a condom.

First woman claims Assange was staying at her apartment in Stockholm when he ripped off her clothes. She told police that when she realized Assange was trying to have unprotected sex with her, she demanded he use a condom. She claims he ripped the condom before having sex.

Second Swedish woman claims she had sex with Assange at her apartment in Stockholm and she made him wear a condom. She alleges that she later woke up to find Assange having unprotected sex with her.

He was questioned by police in Stockholm and denied the allegations. Assange was granted permission by Swedish authorities to fly back to the U.K.  

November: A Swedish court ruled that the investigation should be reopened and Assange should be detained for questioning on suspicion of rape, sexual molestation and unlawful coercion. An international arrest warrant is issued by Swedish police through Interpol.

Wikileaks releases its cache of more than 250,000 U.S. diplomatic cables.  

December: Assange presents himself to London police and appears at an extradition hearing where he is remanded in custody. Assange is granted conditional bail at the High Court in London after his supporters pay £240,000 in cash and sureties.

2011

February: A British judge rules Assange should be extradited to Sweden but Wikileaks found vows to fight the decision.

April:  A cache of classified U.S. military documents is released by Wikileaks, including intelligence assessments on nearly all of the 779 people who are detained at the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.

November: Assange loses High Court appeal against the decision to extradite him.

2012

June: Assange enters the Ecuadorian embassy in London requesting political asylum. 

August: Assange is granted political asylum by Ecuador.

2013

June: Assange tells a group of journalists he will not leave the embassy even if sex charges against him are dropped out of fear he will be extradited to the U.S.

2015

August: Swedish prosecutors drop investigation into some of the sex allegations against Assange due to time restrictions. The investigation into suspected rape remains active.

2016

July: Wikileaks begins leaking emails U.S. Democratic Party officials favoring Hillary Clinton.

November: Assange is questioned over the sex allegation at the Ecuadorian Embassy in the presence of Sweden’s assistant prosecutor Ingrid Isgren and police inspector Cecilia Redell. The interview spans two days. 

2017

January: Barack Obama agrees to free whistleblower Chelsea Manning from prison. Her pending release prompts speculation Assange will end his self-imposed exile after Wikileaks tweeted he would agree to U.S. extradition.

April: Lenin Moreno becomes the new president of Ecuador who was known to want to improve diplomatic relations between his country and the U.S. 

May: An investigation into a sex allegation against Assange is suddenly dropped by Swedish prosecutors. 

2018

January: Ecuador confirms it has granted citizenship to Assange following his request. 

February: Assange is visited by Pamela Anderson and Nobel Peace Prize winner Adolfo Perez Esquivel.

March: The Ecuadorian Embassy suspends Assange’s internet access because he wasn’t complying with a promise he made the previous year to ‘not send messages which entailed interference in relation to other states’.

August: U.S. Senate committee asks to interview Assange as part of their investigation into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 election.

September: Assange steps down as editor of WikiLeaks.

October: Assange reveals he will launch legal action against the government of Ecuador, accusing it of violating his ‘fundamental rights and freedoms’.

November: U.S. Justice Department inadvertently names Assange in a court document that says he has been charged in secret. 

2019

January: Assange’s lawyers say they are taking action to make President Trump’s administration reveal charges ‘secretly filed’ against him.

April 6: WikiLeaks tweets that a high level Ecuadorian source has told them Assange will be expelled from the embassy within ‘hours or days’. But a senior Ecuadorian official says no decision has been made to remove him from the London building. 

April 11: Assange has his diplomatic asylum revoked by Ecuador and he is arrested by the Metropolitan Police; he is remanded in custody by a judge at Westminster Magistrates Court.

April 12: He is found guilty of breaching his bail terms.

May 1: Sentenced to 11 months in jail.

May 2: Court hearing takes place over Assange’s proposed extradition to the U.S. He tells a court he does not consent to the extradition and the case is adjourned until May 30.

May 13: Swedish prosecutors reopen rape case saying they still want to question Assange. 

June 3: Swedish court rules against detaining him in absentia, setting back the extradition case.

June 12 Home Secretary Sajid Javid signs an extradition request from the US.

June 13 A hearing sets out the date for Assange’s full extradition hearing – February next year.

November  Swedish prosecutors stop investigation into an allegation of rape against Mr Assange 

November 25 – Medics say without correct medical care Assange ‘could die’ in Belmarsh 

December 13 –  Hearing in London hears he is being blocked from seeing key evidence in case

December 19 – Appears at Westminster Magistrates Court via video-link where his lawyer claims US bid to extradite him is ‘political’. 

2020   

February 24 –Assange faces an extradition hearing at Woolwich Crown Court.

Assange’s representatives argue he cannot legally be handed to the US for ‘political offences’ because of a 2003 extradition treaty.

March 2 – Assange appears by video link at Westminster Magistrates Court, where he is refused bail amid the coronavirus crisis.

April 11 – Stella Moris, Assange’s partner, who gave birth to his two children while he was living inside the Ecuadorian embassy, issues a plea for his release amid fears for his health.

June 24 – The US Department of Justice issues an updated 18-count indictment, over Assange’s alleged role in ‘one of the largest compromises of classified information in the history of the United States’.

August 25 – Ms Moris visits her partner in Belmarsh prison for the first time in almost six months.

September 7 – Assange’s extradition hearings resume at the Old Bailey. They are expected to go on for up to four weeks.

October 1 – Judge Vanessa Baraitser adjourned the case at the Old Bailey until January 4. 

January 4 – Judge Baraitser strikes down US extradition bid. 

Categories
Entertainment USA

Vanilla Ice Faces Backlash After Performing At Maskless Mar-A-Lago NYE Celebration

Vanilla Ice was dragged on Twitter after video surfaced of the rapper performing at the Mar-a-Lago New Year’s Eve party, where Donald Trump Jr. and more were in attendance amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Vanilla Ice was grilled on social media after the ’90s rapper was spotted amongst a group of performers at the Mar-a-Lago New Year’s Eve party on December 31. The “Ice Ice Baby” rapper, 53, performed his 1989 hit to a crowded, maskless room of attendees. Video from the event, which circulated across social media, captured the moment the rapper took to the stage to perform the song, as well as “Play That Funky Music” by Wild Cherry.

Among the party-goers were President Donald Trump‘s son, Donald Trump Jr., and Don Jr.’s girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle. Both Kimberly and Don Jr. previously tested positive for COVID-19. Kimberly contracted the virus in August 2020, while Don Jr. tested positive in November. President Trump and First Lady Melania Trump were not did not attend the festivities. Many on social media were dismayed by what they saw, taking to Twitter to air their frustrations.

“New Year’s Eve celebration at Mar-a-Lago during deadly pandemic,” one person wrote, adding the footage from the event to their post. Other’s called out Vanilla Ice, specifically. “I just saw video of Kimberly Guilfoyle dancing to Vanilla Ice as she shouted the words ‘play that funky music white boy’ and I’m not sure I will make a full recovery,” one person wrote.

“When Vanilla Ice sings un-ironically ‘play that funky music till you die’ during a pandemic at Mar-A-Lago,” another wrote on Twitter, adding a gif beneath their message. “A live Vanilla Ice performance *and* a chance to catch a deadly disease? That’s win-win,” one person added on the social media platform. “And 2020 ends not with a bang, but with a super-spreading Vanilla Ice concert at Mar-a-Lago,” another person said.

This isn’t the first time that Vanilla Ice has faced backlash for performing for an audience during the pandemic. Back in July, he announced that he’d planned a concert to celebrate the July 4 holiday before bowing to pressure only to share that he would reschedule the event to a “better date.” As those at the Mar-a-Lago New Year’s Eve event partied the night away, the coronavirus continued to claim the lives of thousands of Americans. As of New Year’s Eve, more than 340,000 lives have been claimed by the coronavirus, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Categories
Sports UK

Solskjaer faces Henderson conundrum amid Tottenham transfer interest

Tottenham may look to test Manchester United’s resolve as they consider a move for Dean Henderson.

Much rests on the future of Hugo Lloris who is being linked with a return to France as PSG circle.

Mauricio Pochettino, who led Tottenham for over five years, is about to take charge in Paris and is thought to be eyeing several of his former players.

One of whom is Lloris with the French goalkeeper having one year left on his current deal.

It would leave Jose Mourinho looking for a new No 1 and Henderson would fit the bill, reports the Sun.

Dean Henderson is not first choice at Man Utd

The 23-year-old has proved his top flight credentials at Sheffield United and is seen as a future star at Old Trafford.

Currently though Henderson has been unable to dislodged David de Gea as the club’s first choice shot stopper.

His opportunities have been few and far between leaving Ole Gunnar Solskjaer with a decision to make.

Henderson signed a lucrative long-term deal in the summer so United by no means have to sell up.

The Norwegian has hailed the goalkeeper as the club’s future No 1, but his swift rise is being slowed while he sits on the bench.

Hugo Lloris could leave Tottenham

Much may depend on whether the Englishman begins expressing any discontent.

His time on the bench is harming his international chances too and it looks unlikely he will be able to force his way into the Three Lions first team.

Gareth Southgate has previously stated he will only pick individuals who are playing regularly which could yet cost Henderson his squad place.

Tottenham have also shortlisted West Brom’s Sam Johnstone as a potential Lloris replacement.

The Baggies goalkeeper has produced some excellent performances recently and would no doubt leave the Hawthorns were his side to get relegated.

Categories
Sports USA

Soccer star faces ban for exposing penis after scoring goal

Ex-Borussia Monchengladbach and Augsburg striker Raul Bobadilla caused controversy while playing for Guarani in his homeland, Paraguay.

The 33-year-old Paraguay international hit a dramatic late goal to give the Asuncion side a 3-2 aggregate cup win over Libertad last Wednesday.

But the climax of his match-winning strike proved too much for the hotshot as he celebrated wildly by ripping off his shirt and GPS vest before lowering his shorts.

The referee took no action at the time — but social media images later showed the Paraguay international had exposed part of his penis.

He tried to laugh it off afterward, saying: “I regret my celebration. I hope my wife didn’t see it.

“She should remain calm. It’s all for her.”

However, bad boy Bobadilla could be facing a lengthy ban after the APF, Paraguay’s FA, opened an enquiry into the shock incident.

APF official Raul Prono said: “We have begun official proceedings, as we didn’t receive any written complaints or anything from the referee.

“We got information from the internet, newspapers, and tapes, and they led us to this inquiry.

“We have notified Raul Bobadilla, and he has three days in which to appeal.”

Bobadilla was first exposed to fans in Europe after he helped Basel win the Swiss title in 2013.

He also played for their Super League rivals Grasshoppers and YB Berne.

And he almost secured a move to England back in 2015, but a potential £5 million transfer to Hull City failed to materialize.

Categories
Canada

Event of the Year: Faces of COVID-19

COVID-19 has contaminated virtually every aspect of our lives in 2020. No wonder the pandemic was chosen as New Brunswick’s event of the year by the Acadie Nouvelle editorial board.

Since mid-March, the coronavirus has influenced, from near or far, the actions of everyone in the province. Beyond statistics, daily cases and confined regions, this pandemic is also these masked faces.

Faces of mourning, of combat, of fear, of loneliness, of solidarity.

Taking this opportunity to wish you a much better year 2021, we present five of them to you.

His father’s photo

In front of his graphic designer office in Campbellton, Michel Ouellette has placed the photo of his father Daniel.

Every time he looks at her, the emotions take over. The anecdotes too. It’s hard to lose your father.

It’s even harder to lose him to COVID-19. Cruel. Awful. Foolish.

On June 4, Daniel left this Earth. He was 84 years old. It was the first death in New Brunswick linked to the coronavirus.

“It’s cruel. It is a very cruel disease. And getting through it is not easy, “admits her son.

A death like no other. The family were unable to visit Daniel in the hospital. Four days earlier, she received a call from Manoir de la Vallée in Atholville to tell them that their father was unconscious. The diagnosis that followed, relentless …

The virus attacked one lung first, then the other.

“The doctor called us to tell us that his test was positive. He explained the procedures to us… We couldn’t go see him. I was the one who brought him to see the doctor. My father suffered from Alzheimer’s disease, but he still recognized us. Four days later … It’s awful. It’s something that I don’t wish on anyone, ”he says with emotion.

This tragedy was tough not only for him, but also for his brothers and sisters. His mother did not understand what was happening.

“When you sit down and think about it, it still hurts so much. But we have to go on living … I have his picture in front of me. I always think about it, ”he adds, his voice dead with the ever-present mourning.

What does he get out of it? Michel Ouellette invites the community to be careful, because COVID-19 is not to be taken lightly. He can attest to that.

“It’s crazy how people still don’t want to understand how dangerous this is. They take so many risks… It’s hard to accept. See what’s going on in Toronto or Montreal. It looks like these people are ignorant and think no beyond their noses, “he thinks.

The Ouellette family therefore spends their first holidays without the father. It’s already difficult in itself. As is due to COVID-19, it is worse. It’s cruel.

A mayor must be strong

“The Third world war…”

Charles Bernard took some time to find the right words to qualify the pandemic. But its comparison says it all.

The mayor of Balmoral and chair of the Forum des maires du Restigouche has found himself, unwillingly, at the heart of the action twice, “courtesy” of two major outbreaks.

In his mind, the common enemy of the planet was an experience he never thought he would have.

Things have been difficult for the Restigouche. The second crisis was far more morally damaging than the first, he admits. And as mayor, he has always been in the thick of it, just like his colleagues in other towns and villages.

“Some have passed the crisis better than others,” he said after nine months of severe restrictions. It was complicated for everyone. Yes, there was social media, but it’s not the same as physical presence. The impact on morale was more severe in the second outbreak because it could have been prevented. “

Both in Balmoral and elsewhere in the province, the pandemic has affected the economy and the social safety net of communities. The activities where hundreds of people were gathering suddenly stopped. People had to be kept safe and reminded of restrictive measures.

The role of elected officials was to temporize the fear of citizens, he could see through this experience. You had to be strong. A mayor does not panic. This is not written into his task definition.

Also delay the look of other regions. At one point, the Restigouchois were placed in the hot seat in the face of “this sneaky weapon that strikes quickly and without warning,” notes Mr. Bernard.

“On the other hand, the Restigouche may have had some experiences before others that may have served Premier Blaine Higgs and Chief Medical Officer of Health Dr. Jennifer Russell in adjusting the fight in other regions. Being guinea pigs isn’t fun, I admit, but it made it possible to do things differently. In the end, I think we will come out of this growing up and with better respect for others, ”said the elected official.

Fear of a sneaky virus

First there was fear. The fear of the Unknown. The fear of catching him. But fear is often what keeps things going.

Isabelle-Anne Girouard is an emergency intensive care physician at the Georges-L.-Dumont Hospital in Moncton. In the region of the first outbreak of COVID-19.

The hospital environment could have given in to panic as soon as the first patients affected by this pandemic appeared. But that was not the case. Fortunately for that matter.

“As a doctor, I can say that I have worked in a safe environment,” says the 33-year-old emergency physician from Dieppe who regularly reviews safety protocols. We are well protected. ”

Masks, visors, intensive hand washing have been the lot of doctors and nurses in all hospitals in the province since March. Once the principle of the spread of COVID-19 was understood, different work became a habit and the staff got it right.

“The patients were well looked after,” says Dr. Girouard. We weren’t afraid because it was written COVID-19 on their file. We can work with confidence. It must be said that we were lucky in NB, because we have not reached the point of staff overwork, as we are currently seeing in Quebec or Alberta. If we go into the red phase with a major outbreak, however, it will be difficult for our health system. In the event that this happens here as in Quebec, it is scary. We have very hard working soldiers on the battlefield. They do an amazing job. ”

But it’s still a tough time. Especially when a COVID-19 patient is isolated from their family while they are recovering… or during their last days.

“The hardest part is seeing these patients who unfortunately cannot have a visit. When you are about to die and you cannot see anyone, then it is very difficult. Even though patients can talk on the phone, it’s not like being there, in person, ”said the one who had the disease herself, along with her partner and two young daughters, in November.

The heavy loneliness of isolation

At the end of the line, Victor Anfossi is in a very good mood, despite the heavy loneliness of isolation. He and his wife Lucie feel like they are in heaven at the Résidences Aux Douces Marées in Bas-Caraquet. They have a nice bedroom with two beds, a living room and all the necessary amenities.

“We are treated very well. It’s like a five-star hotel, ”says the 87-year-old Italian retiree, who has been in love with Acadia and a woman from Val-Comeau for 46 years.

Except that since March, their releases have been very rare. Monsieur was not able to go often to his son’s garage in Caraquet, where his wood tower is installed. And when he was able to go, his boy, his wife and two children were to be absent.

The interview is done by phone. Even a journalist cannot enter the residence under the current conditions. This is for families only. It is understandable.

Inside, “no fooling around,” says Anfossi. The attendants wear the mask at all times. The rules of distance are respected to the letter. Everything is cleaned from top to bottom.

“There are some who find it harder than us, I think. But we don’t talk too much about it. Yes, COVID-19 is scary. We haven’t had any friends who had him here. We are well protected, that is the main thing, “he says.

The Acadian Peninsula has yet to be on the pandemic radar in nearly 10 months. The region is in the yellow phase. In particular, this means that visits are restricted to only family members in nursing homes and residences for the elderly.

Victor Anfossi sees his son Michel every weekend. They talk to each other on the phone every day. There may be a restaurant outing during the holidays, but that’s it. Be careful.

“You have to understand that what is being done is for our good,” says the man, who admits all the same that it will be a very bizarre holiday.

The pride of having contributed to the fight

Guy Gagnon has not looked at the mileage of the Coop IGA Caraquet delivery vehicle for a long time. This year the engine has been running at full throttle.

During the first two months of the pandemic, he delivered bags and sacks of food all over Grand Caraquet, and even further. Because of the lockdown, people were reluctant to go do their groceries for fear of catching the virus junk.

“We served the best we could,” he says proudly, hands behind the wheel. People appreciated. We tried to be the best we could be. I don’t know if we succeeded, but the world was happy. ”

Guy has done his part in the fight against COVID-19 and he is proud of it. The days were busy. From early in the morning until sometimes 7 p.m. This was constant, especially in the first weeks of the health crisis. There it is quieter.

“We were well organized,” he analyzes. It was going well. At first we had two vehicles and we weren’t stopping. We were doing the oil changes every two weeks. People have understood. They accepted the situation. But a lot was stressed. ”

Orders were on the doorstep within 24 hours. In Quebec, it could take four to five days in some regions.

“It’s worse than H1N1,” admits Guy Gagnon. People were more afraid. Even with the vaccine coming, they are afraid. It was produced in six months, whereas it normally takes two years. A virus like that comes every 10 years. It’s training for the next one, because never two without three. Personally, I wasn’t really scared, as my job was outside. But those who worked in the store, it was difficult at times. Some people did not understand and were throwing nonsense at us. “

Another delivery is on the schedule. She must not wait. Hop! The bags in the back of the vehicle. The mask on the face. Here he goes for another destination. For another small victory against COVID-19.

Event of the year 2020: the leading peloton

Unsurprisingly, the pandemic crushed everything in its path in the poll conducted with the Acadie Nouvelle newsroom team. Here are three more events that arguably would have been in the running if the year 2020 hadn’t been turned upside down by COVID-19.

The provincial elections of September 14

Less than two years after seizing power from Brian Gallant, Blaine Higgs decided he was tired of being in the minority in the House. He played it all for all last summer, so he could rule on his own.

He first tried to convince the three opposition parties in order to ensure the long-term stability of his government. He was asking them to pledge not to bring him down until 2022 or the end of the pandemic.

In return, he offered them not to call a hasty election and to incorporate some of their priorities into his program.

High-tension negotiations took place in Fredericton in August. They failed when the leader of the Liberal Party, Kevin Vickers, slammed the door.

Blaine Higgs therefore switched to plan B and called for the dissolution of the Assembly in view of a poll on September 14th. In a short 28-day campaign, he gave very few details of his intentions and just vowed to build on the momentum.

Kevin Vickers and the Liberals have managed to narrow the gap between them and Progressive Conservatives in the polls a bit, but not completely. Voters ended up giving Blaine Higgs the majority he so coveted.

The Progressive Conservatives won 27 seats (but none in the North). The Liberals came far behind with 17 seats. Kevin Vickers failed to even get elected in Miramichi and announced his resignation that evening.

As for the Green Party, it won a larger percentage of the vote than in 2018, but only got its three incumbent MPs re-elected. The People’s Alliance lost support provincially and one of its three seats.

The tragic deaths of Chantel Moore and Rodney Levi

In June, two tragedies shone the spotlight on New Brunswick and reminded us that it is not just in our neighbors to the south that members of minority communities fall under the bullets of law enforcement.

On June 4, Chantel Moore – a 26-year-old native from British Columbia – was shot dead by Edmundston police during what was supposed to be a welfare check.

Days later, on June 12, Rodney Levi was shot and killed during an RCMP operation near Miramichi. This member of the indigenous community of Metepenagiag was 48 years old.

Demonstrations were held to honor their memory as well as to denounce police violence and systemic racism. Indigenous leaders have pressured the Higgs government to launch a public inquiry into systemic racism in the justice system and the police.

The Prime Minister has met with Indigenous leaders but refused to launch a public inquiry into the issue. In December, the official opposition tabled a motion calling on the government to act.

Aboriginal Affairs Minister Arlene Dunn withdrew all mention of a public inquiry into systemic racism before the motion was passed.

New Brunswick’s Wolastoqi and Mi’kmaq leaders responded by calling for his resignation and slamming the door of a task force of First Nations and four party representatives in the Legislative Assembly.

The failed reform of rural emergencies

On February 11, the Progressive Conservative government of Blaine Higgs threw a paving stone in the water by announcing the emergency closures of six rural hospitals overnight.

The establishments affected were those of Caraquet, Grand-Sault, Sainte-Anne-de-Kent, Perth-Andover, Sussex and Sackville. This important change was to come into effect on March 11.

Resources used at night in emergency departments at these six hospitals were to be reallocated to day services, long-term care and mental health.

This reform of the Higgs government – which was in the minority in the legislature at the time – struck a chord and quickly sparked an outcry.

Deputy Prime Minister and Member of Parliament for Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou, Robert Gauvin, tried to push the Prime Minister back. Faced with his refusal, he slammed the door of his party on February 14. Blaine Higgs thus lost his only member from the North (and the only francophone in his caucus).

The government backed down two days later. The Prime Minister put the changes on hold and announced consultations. Consultations that did not take place, since the pandemic turned everything upside down a month later.

Failed rural emergency reform followed Blaine Higgs for much of the year. During the provincial election campaign in August and September, the Liberals did everything to remind voters of this crisis.

On September 14, the Progressive Conservatives were completely whitewashed in the north (excluding Carleton-Victoria, part of which is north of Miramichi). They were unable to hang in Shippagan-Lamèque-Miscou and were thoroughly beaten in Caraquet.

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