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Trump spends first weekend as ex-president playing golf at his West Palm Beach club

Donald Trump spent his first weekend as the former president of the United States indulging in his favorite pastime, and at one point, waving at a crowd of supporters as they welcomed him back to his second home in Palm Beach, Florida.  

Trump was seen playing a couple rounds of golf on Saturday at his West Palm Beach club golf course, one of his top vacation destinations away from the White House.

The former president wore his signature red ‘Make America Great Again’ campaign cap and a white polo shirt as he golfed, before being transported to his Mar-a-Lago resort – his new permanent home. 

Upon his return, Trump was greeted by a small crowd of supporters, some of whom were carrying American flags as well as signs that read: ‘Still My President!’ and ‘Trump Won!’ 

As his motorcade drove by, Trump flashed a smile and waved cheerfully at the group of adoring fans lining the road. 

Trump was back at the golf course days after moving to his new permanent home

Donald Trump spent his first Saturday since leaving the White House playing golf at his International Golf Club in West Palm Beach

The former president wore his signature red 'Make America Great Again' campaign cap and a white polo shirt as he golfed

The former president wore his signature red ‘Make America Great Again’ campaign cap and a white polo shirt as he golfed

Trump returned to the Sunshine State Wednesday morning instead of following tradition by attending his successor's inauguration

Trump returned to the Sunshine State Wednesday morning instead of following tradition by attending his successor’s inauguration

Trump had spent much of his time as president playing golf at his various courses across the country and around the world, but especially his West Palm Beach club

Trump had spent much of his time as president playing golf at his various courses across the country and around the world, but especially his West Palm Beach club

The outgoing president returned to the Sunshine State Wednesday morning as he refused to follow tradition and attend the inauguration of his successor President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris. 

Trump had spent much of his time as president playing golf at his various courses across the country and around the world, but especially his West Palm Beach club. 

He was on his course in Virginia when he learned he had lost the presidential election to Joe Biden on November 7. 

And with his permanent move back to Mar-a-Lago coupled with his newfound lack of government employment he will be able to enjoy his favorite hobby even more.  

It comes as House Democrats announced they have set the date for opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial for Trump over the Capitol riots.

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer announced the schedule Friday evening after reaching an agreement with Republicans, who had pushed for a delay to give Trump a chance to organize his legal team and prepare a defense on the sole charge of incitement of insurrection.

Upon his return to his Mar-a-Lago resort, Trump was greeted by a small crowd of supporters showing their support for the former president

Upon his return to his Mar-a-Lago resort, Trump was greeted by a small crowd of supporters showing their support for the former president 

As his motorcade drove by, Trump flashed a smile and waved cheerfully at the group of adoring fans lining the road

At one point, he gave his supporters a thumbs up

As his motorcade drove by, Trump flashed a smile and waved cheerfully at the group of adoring fans lining the road 

Trump received a warm welcome upon his return to Florida, one of the states he won during the presidential election

Trump received a warm welcome upon his return to Florida, one of the states he won during the presidential election 

A group of fans stood outside on the road waving American flags as the former commander-in-chief rode by

A group of fans stood outside on the road waving American flags as the former commander-in-chief rode by 

The trial will begin the week of February 8, the first time a former president will face such charges after leaving office.

The February start date also allows the Senate more time to confirm President Joe Biden’s Cabinet nominations and consider his proposed $1.9trillion COVID relief package – top priorities of the new White House agenda that could become stalled during trial proceedings.

‘We all want to put this awful chapter in our nation´s history behind us,’ Schumer said about the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol siege by a mob of pro-Trump supporters.

‘But healing and unity will only come if there is truth and accountability. And that is what this trial will provide.’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi will send the article of impeachment late Monday, with senators sworn in as jurors Tuesday. But opening arguments will move to February.

Some Trump fans were waving American flags as well as signs that read: 'Still My President!' and 'Trump Won!'

Some Trump fans were waving American flags as well as signs that read: ‘Still My President!’ and ‘Trump Won!’

A group of Trump fans were seen being interviewed as they rallied for the former president on Saturday

A group of Trump fans were seen being interviewed as they rallied for the former president on Saturday 

Trump has left Washington but now faces an impeachment trial that could potentially upend his chances for a political comeback

 Trump has left Washington but now faces an impeachment trial that could potentially upend his chances for a political comeback

A woman shows her support for Trump as he drives by in his motorcade in Florida

A woman shows her support for Trump as he drives by in his motorcade in Florida 

Trump’s impeachment trial would be the first of a U.S. president no longer in office, an undertaking that his Senate Republican allies argue is pointless, and potentially even unconstitutional. Democrats say they have to hold Trump to account, even as they pursue Biden’s legislative priorities, because of the gravity of what took place – a violent attack on the U.S. Congress aimed at overturning an election.

If Trump is convicted, the Senate could vote to bar him from holding office ever again, potentially upending his chances for a political comeback.  

The words of Trump’s supporters who are accused of participating in the deadly U.S. Capitol riot could also potentially end up being used against him in his Senate impeachment trial.

At least five supporters facing federal charges have suggested they were taking orders from the then-president when they marched on Capitol Hill on January 6 to challenge the certification of Joe Biden’s election win. 

But now those comments, captured in interviews with reporters and federal agents, are likely to take center stage as Democrats lay out their case. It’s the first time a former president will face such charges after leaving office.

‘I feel like I was basically following my president. I was following what we were called to do. He asked us to fly there. He asked us to be there,’ Jenna Ryan, a Texas real estate agent who posted a photo on Twitter of herself flashing a peace sign next to a broken Capitol window, told a Dallas-Fort Worth TV station.

Jacob Chansley, the Arizona man photographed on the dais in the Senate who was shirtless and wore face paint and a furry hat with horns, has similarly pointed a finger at Trump.

Donald and Melania Trump arrive in Florida on Air Force One after leaving Washington DC Wednesday

Donald and Melania Trump arrive in Florida on Air Force One after leaving Washington DC Wednesday 

Chansley called the FBI the day after the insurrection and told agents he traveled ‘at the request of the president that all ‘patriots’ come to D.C. on January 6, 2021,’ authorities wrote in court papers.

Chanley’s lawyer unsuccessfully lobbied for a pardon for his client before Trump’s term ended, saying Chansley ‘felt like he was answering the call of our president.’ 

Authorities say that while up on the dais in the Senate chamber, Chansley wrote a threatening note to then-Vice President Mike Pence that said: ‘It´s only a matter of time, justice is coming.’

For weeks, Trump rallied his supporters against the election outcome and urged them to come to the Capitol to rage against Biden’s win. Trump spoke to the crowd near the White House shortly before they marched along Pennsylvania Avenue to Capitol Hill.

‘We will never give up. We will never concede. It doesn’t happen,’ Trump said. ‘You don’t concede when there’s theft involved. Our country has had enough. We will not take it anymore.’

Later he said: ‘If you don’t fight like hell you’re not going to have a country anymore.’ He told supporters to walk to the Capitol to ‘peacefully and patriotically’ make your voices heard.

Trump has taken no responsibility for his part in fomenting the violence, saying days after the attack: ‘People thought that what I said was totally appropriate.’

Unlike a criminal trial, where there are strict rules about what is and isn´t evidence, the Senate can consider anything it wishes. And if they can show that Trump´s words made a real impact, all the better, and scholars expect it in the trial. 

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Headline USA Politics

The Symbolisms of Joe Biden’s New Oval Office (And What Changed From Trump’s) | The State

It is common for new US presidents to add their personal touch to the White House Oval Office upon arrival. AND the changes Joe Biden made As soon as they arrive, they are a declaration of intent.

The president’s office, in the west wing of the White House, has been decorated with portraits and busts of some of the most iconic and influential leaders of the country’s history.

“It was important for President Biden to walk into an Oval Office that looked like the United States and began to give a vision of who he is going to be as president,” Ashley Williams, deputy director of operations of the Oval Office, explained to The Washington Post during an exclusive visit.

Gone was the portrait of Andrew Jackson, the 7th president of the United States and populist leader with whom Trump frequently identified and whose administration also faced disapproval despite never being the subject of impeachment (impeachment).

His portrait, to the left of the “Resolute” desk seat, was replaced with one of Benjamin Franklin, one of the nation’s founding fathers and a prominent writer, scientist, and philosopher.

The Post noted that Franklin’s portrait was intended represent interest of President Biden on trusting science in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks

From his desk, Biden will look up and see, flanking the fireplace, busts of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy, two men whose impact on the civil rights movement is regularly mentioned by the president, according to the US press. .

Other busts placed in the room include that of prominent activist Rosa Parks.

The busts of Rosa Parks and Abraham Lincoln in Biden's Oval Office.
The busts of Rosa Parks and Abraham Lincoln. (Photo: Getty Images)

Above the fireplace hangs a portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt, the president who led the country through the Great Depression and World War II.

The painting of another former president, Thomas Jefferson, is accompanied by another of a man with whom he commonly had disagreements: the former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton, a “symbol of how differences of opinion, expressed within the rails of the Republic, are essential for democracy,” the president’s office noted, according to The Post.

Trump in the Oval Office with Pence, Pelosi and Schumer on December 11, 2018
The portraits of Jefferson and Hamilton (right and left) have remained beside the fireplace, placed differently, but the central portrait of George Washington has been replaced by that of Franklin D. Roosevelt. (Photo: EPA)

Portraits of other famous former presidents, George Washington and Abraham Lincoln, were also placed paired.

A very prominent detail

But if there is a detail that especially caught the attention of the public on social networks, it was the bust of the Hispanic union leader Cesar Chavez.

The bust of Chávez (1927-1993) can be found just behind Biden’s desk chair, on a table and in a privileged place: among numerous family photos.

César Chávez's bus stands among family photos of Biden in the Oval Office.
César Chávez’s bus stands among family photos of Biden. (Photo: Getty Images)

Chávez, a native of Arizona, was the founder of the United Farm Workers union and one of the most important Latino leaders in defense of the civil rights of Hispanics and farm workers, mostly immigrants.

The activist made popular the cry of “yes, we can”, created by his union partner Dolores Huerta and that years later Barack Obama would adopt in his campaign for the presidency.

Golden curtains outside

Another thing Biden broke with upon arrival was the golden curtains placed by Trump when he took office in 2017.

The gold has been replaced by curtains of a darker shade of that same color and blue, which adorned that same office when Democratic President Bill Clinton was in office, reports The Washington Post.

The flags of the different branches of the Army have also been replaced by the American flag and another with the presidential seal.

Biden also decided to get rid of a controversial bust of the British leader. Winston Churchill.

Trump had promised to return that bust to the Oval Office after it was removed by his predecessor, Barack Obama.

The then Foreign Minister Boris Johnson – now Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – then accused Obama of “having a ancestral dislike for the British Empire ”.

On this occasion, his spokesman moved away from the controversy: “The Oval Office is the president’s private office and it is up to him to decorate it as he wishes.”


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Social media users go wild over Melania Trump refusing to pose for cameras after leaving White House

‘She is so DONE!’ Video of a stony-faced Melania Trump refusing to stop and pose for the cameras after leaving the White House goes viral

  • Former President Donald Trump and his wife Melania skipped the inauguration and flew south to Palm Beach, Florida on Wednesday morning
  • Melania, 50, changed outfits on the plane but didn’t stop to pose for pictures after landing
  • Though her husband paused to wave and face the cameras, Melania didn’t break stride and continued on past him to the car
  • Social media users find a video clip of the moment incredibly funny and say she is done acting like she cares about Trump or being in the public eye

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Former First Lady Melania Trump made clear that she is ready for a break from the spotlight yesterday when she refused to stop and pose for waiting photographers upon her arrival in Florida – instead striding away from them without so much as a wave while her husband posed for pictures.   

Video of the moment a stony-faced Melania, 50, purposefully walked straight past the media at Palm Beach Airport while leaving husband Donald in her wake has left many with the impression that she is done playing nice for the cameras.  

The recording has gone Twitter, where users are pointing out that the mother-of-one appears to ‘give no f***s’ anymore, with some even speculating that she is moments away from filing for divorce.

She’s out! Upon landing in Palm Beach yesterday, Melania Trump didn’t break stride as her husband waved as photographers, and continued walking her car 

She's over it!  Social media users are going wild over a three-second clip of her refusing to stop and pose and wave

She’s over it!  Social media users are going wild over a three-second clip of her refusing to stop and pose and wave

Off-dusty: The former first lady simply kept walking off camera without stopping for the cameras

Off-dusty: The former first lady simply kept walking off camera without stopping for the cameras

The Trumps left D.C. on Air Force One early on Wednesday and landed hours later in Florida to stay at Mar-a-Lago.

On board, Melania staged an outfit change, swapping the somber black look she departed in for a colorful $3,700 Gucci dress and kicking off her $795 Christian Louboutin heels for $625 ballerina flats by Roger Vivier. 

Her outfit seemed to speak volumes about her desire to throw off the stress of life in the White House – with many noting that she appeared ready for a vacation. 

But though changing into a new designer outfit indicated that she knew she’d be photographed upon landing, Melania didn’t seem to have any time or patience for the photographers.

Video footage shows her walking alongside her husband as Trump stops, turns toward the camera, smiles, and waves.

Melania, though, continued walking at the same pace, sparing a frowning glance at the crowd and cameras but otherwise not acknowledging their presence. 

Ending? Many are speculating that she will file for divorce any day now

One social media user shared a recording of the moment from TV, writing: ‘If “I ain’t got to do this s*** anymore” was a person. 

Others have similar ideas about her attitude, saying that Melania seems to be done with playing along and playing nice. 

‘She has NO f***s anymore! She is DONE with him! Contract is over!’ wrote one.

‘Nothing says I’m done more than a muumuu,’ said another.

‘She so freaking DONE with this nonsense,’ wrote one more. 

Dozens have cracked jokes speculating that Melania is moments away from divorcing Trump now that he is no longer president. 

‘Melania is so over this ego clown. I’m going to predict divorce papers are filed in the first 90 days as civilians,’ wrote one. 

‘She’s looking forward to signing those divorce papers asap,’ wrote another. 

‘Divorce papers were being delivered before that clip ended,’ said yet another, while one more quipped: ‘She’s in a hurry. Got a meeting with the divorce lawyer in 10. ‘

Changes: Melania changed her outfit on the plane from Washington, D.C., swapping a somber black ensemble for a colorful $3,700 Gucci dress and navy ballerina flats

Changes: Melania changed her outfit on the plane from Washington, D.C., swapping a somber black ensemble for a colorful $3,700 Gucci dress and navy ballerina flats 

On the move: The former First Lady did appear to flash a wave to supporters as she reached the car - but refused to pause for photographers

On the move: The former First Lady did appear to flash a wave to supporters as she reached the car - but refused to pause for photographers

On the move: The former First Lady did appear to flash a wave to supporters as she reached the car – but refused to pause for photographers 

‘The terms of her post-nuptial just expired. 

There have been reports that Melania renegotiated her prenuptial agreement with Trump before moving into the White House.

Last year, Melania’s former aide Stephanie Wolkoff alleged that the Trumps had separate bedrooms in the White House and ‘a transactional marriage’.

Fellow ex-aide Omarosa Manigault Newman claimed the couple’s 15-year marriage was over, adding: ‘Melania is counting every minute until he is out of office and she can divorce.

‘If Melania were to try to pull the ultimate humiliation and leave while he’s in office, he would find a way to punish her.’ 

Photographs taken at the airport indicate that Melania did flash a quick wave to some of the supporters who had gathered to greet the Trumps in Florida – however she does appear to have paused for even a second before jumping into the waiting SUV.  

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Barack Obama’s inspiring message to Joe Biden on Twitter before the inauguration | The State

Barack and Michelle Obama at Joe Biden’s inauguration ceremony.

Photo:
Alex Wong / Getty Images

He former President Barack Obama sent a message of support to Joe biden from his Twitter account this morning to little for the Democrat to be sworn in as the new tenant of the White House.

“Congratulations to my colleague, President Joe Biden. This is your moment, “Obama shared on his account today along with an image of him with Biden.

Three former US presidents meet at the ceremony

Obama with the also democrat Bill Clinton and Republican George W. Bush They are the three former presidents who have already arrived at the federal Capitol for Biden’s inauguration.

Barack Obama takes office from Biden
Barack and Michelle Obama at the inauguration ceremony for Joe Biden. (Getty Images)
Biden takeover
George W. Bush and his wife Laura, at Biden’s inauguration ceremony. (Getty Images)
Biden takeover
Bill and Hillary Clinton at Joe Biden’s inauguration ceremony. (Getty Images)

Outgoing President Donald Trump will not participate in the event and will not receive Biden in the White House as is tradition in the transition processes. Trump is already in Palm Beach, Florida, where he left this morning after a brief message at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland. President Jimmy Carter, who at 96 is the oldest former president, will not attend the event marked by a large presence of the military and other security forces.

Despite Trump’s absence, his vice president Mike Pence participates in the ceremony. Pence did not accompany Trump on his departure from the White House.

Biden to be sworn in before Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. While the judge of Puerto Rican origin Sonia Sotomayor to swear in the first female vice president in U.S. history Kamala Harris.

The official ceremony begins at 11 a.m.

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Headline USA Politics

Donald Trump ‘decides to pardon Steve Bannon’

BREAKING: Donald Trump ‘decides to pardon Steve Bannon’ after his former aide was charged with defrauding MAGA supporters out of millions

Donald Trump has decided to pardon Steve Bannon in his final hours in the White House, CNN and Bloomberg reported Tuesday.

The outgoing president’s former aide was was charged with defrauding MAGA supporters out of millions over the border wall.

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Headlines UK London

Tiffany Trump reveals she is ENGAGED to ‘amazing fiancé’ Michael Boulos

Tiffany Trump used her father’s final day as President to announce that she is engaged to her billionaire partner Michael Boulos, while sharing an image of them celebrating their happy news together at the White House.    

The 27-year-old First Daughter shared the news in a gushing social media post on Tuesday, posting a smiling picture of herself and 23-year-old Michael posing outside the West Wing – having seized the opportunity to snag a final White House photo together before President Donald Trump leaves office on Wednesday.

In her post, the Georgetown Law graduate described the engagement as her most ‘special’ White House memory, while paying tribute to her ‘amazing fiancé’, whom she has been dating for just over two years.   

‘It has been an honor to celebrate many milestones, historic occasions and create memories with my family here at the White House, none more special than my engagement to my amazing fiancé Michael!’ she wrote. 

News: Tiffany Trump, 27, used her father’s last day as President to announce her engagement to billionaire Michael Boulos, 23, while sharing an image of them posing outside the West Wing

Timing: The First Daughter chose to share the news on her father's final day in office, describing her engagement as her most 'special' White House memory

Timing: The First Daughter chose to share the news on her father’s final day in office, describing her engagement as her most ‘special’ White House memory 

‘Feeling blessed and excited for the next chapter!’ 

A source told Page Six that Michael proposed to Tiffany in the Rose Garden at the White house over the weekend, after they flew in from Miami, where they’ve been staying. 

‘The family is delighted,’ the insider said.  

In the photo Tiffany shared, the newly-engaged couple is seen posing together in the West Wing Colonnade, with their arms around each other – while she proudly shows off the large diamond engagement ring that Michael presented her with.   

Bling: The image of the couple taken at the White House features Tiffany's large diamond engagement ring

Bling: The image of the couple taken at the White House features Tiffany’s large diamond engagement ring 

The ring was designed at Samer Halimeh New York the jeweler confirmed to DailyMail.com 

The bride-to-be is dressed in a classic short-sleeved dress, which she accessorized with sparkly black heels. Her long blonde hair is styled straight and loose around her shoulders as she smiles for the camera. 

Meanwhile, Michael is seen sporting a dark suit, gray tie, and an American flag pin showing support for his fiancée’s home country. 

The business development manager, who is the heir to the multi-billion dollar Nigerian conglomerate Boulos Enterprises, was born in Lebanon and grew up in Nigeria before moving stateside to be with Tiffany. 

Michael responded to her engagement post in the comments, writing: ‘Love you honey.’ 

He also proudly announced the joyous news on his Instagram page using the same photo from the White House – likely the last image that the couple posed for before Trump’s presidency comes to an end. 

‘Got engaged to the love of my life! Looking forward to our next chapter together,’ he captioned the photo. 

Mystery: It's unclear if Michael, 23, asked President Donald Trump for his daughter's hand in marriage, but he has spent plenty of time with Tiffany's father in recent months

Mystery: It’s unclear if Michael, 23, asked President Donald Trump for his daughter’s hand in marriage, but he has spent plenty of time with Tiffany’s father in recent months 

Support: Michael spent much time by Tiffany's side while she campaigned for her father across the country ahead of last year's presidential election

Support: Michael spent much time by Tiffany’s side while she campaigned for her father across the country ahead of last year’s presidential election 

The timing of the couple’s announcement sparked several questions on social media, with a few users asking why they chose to reveal the news of their engagement in the final hours of Trump’s presidency, when Tiffany’s family is facing such an uncertain future.

‘Interesting timing, it must be true love,’ one Twitter user commented. 

Happy: Tiffany's mother Marla Maples, 57, celebrated the news on her Instagram Stories

Happy: Tiffany’s mother Marla Maples, 57, celebrated the news on her Instagram Stories 

Another hit out at the law school grad for taking advantage of her father’s final day in office to share her own personal news, writing: ‘Again [Tiffany] read the room, just read the room.’ 

Michael and Tiffany’s engagement certainly comes amid a time of great upheaval for the Trump family – many of whom are expected to put down roots in Florida in the coming months, including the newly-engaged couple who are said to have been looking for properties together in Miami.  

The couple has been staying at the swanky Setai Hotel in Miami’s glamorous South Beach neighborhood, but a source close to Tiffany told DailyMail.com last week that she is on the hunt for a place that the couple can call their own.  

‘She has been in Miami looking at properties,’ the insider revealed. ‘She was staying at the Setai Hotel while she was viewing different options.’ 

President Trump and his wife Melania are planning to retire at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Florida, after they leave White House life behind in January. 

The glitzy town is only a little over an hour north of Miami, where Tiffany’s sister Ivanka Trump has already purchased land to build a property.   

One of the family: Michael has spent an increasing amount of time by Tiffany's side at official White House events, including a Christmas party hosted by President Trump last month

One of the family: Michael has spent an increasing amount of time by Tiffany’s side at official White House events, including a Christmas party hosted by President Trump last month 

Official: Tiffany and Michael started dating in 2018, and she shared her first photo with him in January 2019, after attending the White House Christmas party together

Official: Tiffany and Michael started dating in 2018, and she shared her first photo with him in January 2019, after attending the White House Christmas party together 

Tiffany and Michael have been dating since they met in Mykonos, Greece, in the summer of 2018, and they have both spent plenty of quality time with each other’s parents. 

Just a few months ago, Tiffany’s mother Marla Maples gushed on her Instagram Stories that Michael is ‘like a son’ to her, and she couldn’t be happier about their engagement. 

Shortly after her daughter went public with the news, the 57-year-old shared Tiffany’s post on her Instagram Stories to congratulate the newly-engaged couple. 

‘Celebrating God’s endless blessing of love,’ Marla wrote. ‘May God’s blessings & love always light your path. Love you so much, mom.’ 

Michael has also spent plenty of time with Tiffany’s father, President Trump, whom he has shown great support for.  

He was often by her side on the campaign trail and attended a number of political events with her and her family, including appearances at the White House. 

While Trump likely knows about his daughter’s engagement, he is unable to  congratulate her on Twitter, his main mode of public communication. 

He was banned from the platform over concerns his statements could provoke more violence following the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on January 6.  

It’s unclear if Michael asked President Trump for his youngest daughter’s hand in marriage, though a source told Page Six it’s ‘highly likely’ considering the proposal took place at the White House. 

Tiffany started dating Michael less than a year after she and her college boyfriend Ross Mechanic called it quits in late 2017. 

Going public: Tiffany was first spotted with Michael at the Taoray Wang show during New York Fashion Week in September 2018

Going public: Tiffany was first spotted with Michael at the Taoray Wang show during New York Fashion Week in September 2018

Not yet: The couple browsed engagement rings at the Samer Halimeh New York store in London in June 2019, but Tiffany only picked up a $663,000 diamond 'friendship' bracelet

Not yet: The couple browsed engagement rings at the Samer Halimeh New York store in London in June 2019, but Tiffany only picked up a $663,000 diamond ‘friendship’ bracelet 

She met Ross, now 26, when they were both undergraduate students at The University of Pennsylvania. They dated for two years and were together throughout her father’s 2016 presidential campaign and subsequent inauguration. 

It’s unclear if politics played a part in her breakup from Ross, who was a registered Democrat at the time. They had taken a trip to Europe together in July 2017, but just two months later they appeared to be living separate lives.  

Rumors of trouble in paradise began swirling in September 2017 when Ross set his once-public Instagram profile to private.  

Five months later, he confirmed the split when he made things ‘Instagram official’ with his new girlfriend, sharing a photo of himself kissing her on his page.  

Tiffany was first spotted with Michael at the Taoray Wang show during New York Fashion Week in September 2018. She reportedly took him to her father’s Mar-Lago estate for Thanksgiving dinner that year.    

She shared her first photo with Michael in January 2019, after attending the White House Christmas party together. 

The majority of their relationship was a long-distance one, with Tiffany attending law school at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. and Michael based in London.  

After a year together, they were spotted browsing engagement rings at the Samer Halimeh New York store in London in June 2019, but Tiffany only picked up a $663,000 diamond ‘friendship’ bracelet while at the jeweler’s Knightsbridge store.

Speaking to the Evening Standard, the manager of the store, Maan Chakhchir, said the couple is ‘very down-to-earth and clearly very happy together.’

‘They seem very much in love. If they get engaged, I know that Mr. Halimeh would be perfect for designing the ring,’ he said at the time.   

Family affair: Tiffany, Michael, and his parents, Massad and Sarah Boulos, attended a holiday party hosted by President Trump and First Lady Melania at the White House in 2019

Family affair: Tiffany, Michael, and his parents, Massad and Sarah Boulos, attended a holiday party hosted by President Trump and First Lady Melania at the White House in 2019

Nope: Last year, Michael shut down rumors they were engaged after ringing in 2020 at President Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida

Nope: Last year, Michael shut down rumors they were engaged after ringing in 2020 at President Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Florida 

Ex files: Tiffany started dating Michael less than a year after she and her college boyfriend Ross Mechanic (pictured at the Taoray Wang show in February 2017) called it quits in late 2017

Ex files: Tiffany started dating Michael less than a year after she and her college boyfriend Ross Mechanic (pictured at the Taoray Wang show in February 2017) called it quits in late 2017

The couple’s engagement comes one year after Michael shut down rumors that they were getting married. In January 2020, he insisted that the engagement party invitation that was circulating online was fake.  

‘FYI though, the letter/invitation that has spread around in the past two days is not real,’ he wrote on his Instagram Story at the tike. ‘It’s been completely made up…’ 

However, wedding bells were clearly on his mind as they announced their engagement exactly a year later, though some have considered it incredibly poor timing on her part.

Earlier this month, Tiffany came under fire for an ill-timed tweet after she sent a birthday message to her brother Eric Trump amid the siege on the U.S. Capitol.  

‘Happy Birthday @erictrump I love you and I’m so grateful to always have you by my side!’ the president’s daughter tweeted on January 6, just minutes before the 6 p.m. Washington, D.C. curfew went into effect.

She also posted photos of herself with her brother, who turned 37, including one of the pair posing in front of the Washington Monument, which was the scene of unrest.

Social media users were quick to hit out at the president’s daughter, telling her to ‘read the room’.

‘Clearly haven’t spoken to your family or seen the news,’ one person tweeted.

Another simply told her to ‘read the room’ while someone else hit out saying: ‘Kind of a tone deaf and ill timed message isn’t it?’ 

Tiffany’s timing was perhaps all the more bizarre as she fired off the birthday message in between two tweets calling for peace. 

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Trump will leave the White House at ‘8am Wednesday’ – the morning of Biden’s inauguration

Donald Trump is reportedly set to leave the White House for Florida at 8am on Wednesday after issuing around 100 pardons to white-collar criminals, high-profile rappers and a jailed Florida eye-doctor.

The outgoing president is due to hold a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, in Maryland, before his departure from the nation’s capital on the morning of Joe Biden’s inauguration, two sources told USA Today.  

White House aides have reportedly sent out invitations for the event, with guests instructed to arrive between 6am and 7:15am. 

Specific details regarding the ceremony are said to still be under consideration, but it may include a color guard and 21-gun salute. 

Attendees are permitted to bring up to five guests but have been instructed to wear masks throughout, Bloomberg’s Jennifer Jacobs reported.    

For his final full day in office on Tuesday, Trump is also reportedly gearing up to issue around 100 pardons and commutations.

A rumored recipient of one of the clemency actions is said to be Dr. Salomon Melgen, a prominent eye doctor from Palm Beach who was imprisoned in 2018 after being convicted on dozens of counts of health care fraud.

So far, Trump has reportedly made no plans to pardon himself or his children, CNN reported. 

The outgoing president is due to hold a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, in Maryland, before his departure from the nation’s capital

Moving trucks are pictured on West Executive Avenue between the West Wing of the White House and the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Sunday

Moving trucks are pictured on West Executive Avenue between the West Wing of the White House and the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on Sunday

A rumored recipient of one of the clemency actions is said to be Dr. Salomon Melgen (above), a prominent eye doctor from Palm Beach who was imprisoned in 2018 after being convicted on dozens of counts of health care fraud.

A rumored recipient of one of the clemency actions is said to be Dr. Salomon Melgen (above), a prominent eye doctor from Palm Beach who was imprisoned in 2018 after being convicted on dozens of counts of health care fraud.

The White House reportedly held a meeting Sunday to finalize the list of pardons, according to two sources. 

Trump had previously issued a number of pardons in the build up to Christmas, but reportedly put them on pause in the days before and after the riots at the US Capitol on January 6.

White House aides told CNN Trump was entirely focused on the Electoral College count in the days preceding the riot, which prevented him from finalizing his decision on pardons. Officials then expected him to resume of January 6, but he reportedly withdrew after being blamed for inciting the insurrection. 

Trump’s Tuesday batch of clemency actions is expected to include a mixture of criminal justice reform-minded pardons and more controversial ones issued to his political allies. 

He could also decide at the last minute to grant pardons to members of his family or even himself, though that’s not thought to be currently under consideration.

Trump’s desire to pardon himself, his children, and his personal layer Rudy Giuliani has said to have been complicated by the Capitol riots, which led to his second impeachment.

The 45th US president was reportedly advised to forgo a self-pardon in the riot’s wake, because it would appear as if he was guilty of something, a source familiar with the matter told CNN. 

Trump was further advised to refrain from granting clemency to anyone involved in the deadly attack on the Capitol, in contrast to his initial stance that those involved were ‘patriots’ who had done nothing wrong.

‘There are a lot of people urging the President to pardon the folks [involved in the riots]’ Senator Lindsey Graham told Fox News. ‘To seek a pardon of these people would be wrong.’

While Trump is expected to leave the White House early Wednesday morning, he could continue to issue pardons up until noon on Inauguration Day. 

Other high profile names such as Wikileaks founder Julian Assange are also not currently believed to be among those set to receive a pardon, though the list is said to be fluid.

Trump’s allies predict the president will issue pardons that he believes may be of benefit to him after he leaves office.

‘Everything is a transaction. He likes pardons because it is unilateral,’ a source told CNN. ‘And he likes doing favors for people he thinks will owe him.’ 

While Trump is expected to leave the White House early Wednesday morning, he could continue to issue pardons up until noon on Inauguration Day

While Trump is expected to leave the White House early Wednesday morning, he could continue to issue pardons up until noon on Inauguration Day 

The outgoing president is due to hold a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, in Maryland, the usual jumping-off point for Air Force One (above)

The outgoing president is due to hold a farewell ceremony at Joint Base Andrews, in Maryland, the usual jumping-off point for Air Force One (above)

One of those said to be in line to receive a pardon is Dr. Salomon Melgen.

Melgen, once a prominent Palm Beach eye doctor, received a 17-year sentence in 2018 for stealing $73 million from Medicare by persuading elderly patients to undergo tests and treatments they didn’t need for diseases they didn’t have.

In total, he was convicted of 67 crimes, including health care fraud, submitting false claims and falsifying records in patients’ files.

In 2017, he was also ensnared in a public corruption scandal alongside New Jersey Democratic Senator Robert Menendez.

A federal jury remained hung after a two-and-a-half month trial, in which prosecutors tried to prove Melgen’s gifts to Menendez were actually bribes. 

In return, prosecutors claimed Menendez interceded with Medicare officials investigating his practice, obtained visas for Melgen’s foreign mistresses, and pressured the State Department to intervene in a business dispute he had with the Dominican government.

Both men pleaded not guilty to 18 counts of fraud and bribery saying the European and Dominican vacations and other gifts were tokens of their longtime friendship.

After a judge threw out of the charges in the case, prosecutors decided in January 2018 not to retry the bribery case and it was subsequently dismissed by the Justice Department.

Inside the White House, there has been a reported frenzy among allies lobbyists and others hoping to cash in on their loyalty to Trump and secure a pardon.

The New York Times reported Sunday some of those people were getting paid tens of thousands of dollars to lobby on behalf of felons hoping for pardons. 

In one document, a former top adviser to Trump’s campaign agreed to receive a payout of $50,000 if he could sway the president to pardon John Kirakou, a former CIA officer convicted of disclosing classified information.

Separately, Rudy Giuliani’s associate told Kiriakou over drinks at Trump Hotel in Washington D.C. last year that if he paid Trump’s personal attorney $2 million, he would use his sway as one of the president’s closest advisers to secure him the pardon. 

Although Kiriakou did not accept the offer, an associate alerted the FBI to Giuliani potentially illegally selling pardons – but the former New York City mayor and Trump’s personal attorney has challenged this characterization.

Giuliani has come under fire recently for firing up a crowd of thousands of Trump supporters, telling them to engage in ‘trial by combat’, before they marched over to the U.S. Capitol and stormed the building to delay Congress from certifying the election for Joe Biden.

Recently reports also reveal Giuliani has fallen out of favor with the president in his failed legal attempts to challenge the election results.

 

This is a developing story…

Categories
Headline USA Politics

Donald Trump holds talks with MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell who brandishes notes about ‘MARTIAL LAW’

Even after acknowledging the upcoming transition, President Donald Trump met Friday with MyPillow exec Mike Lindell – who carried notes into the White House that referenced Martial Law and even a final leadership shakeup at the CIA.

Lindell, a Trump advisor who backed many of his conspiracy theories about massive election fraud, appeared unexpectedly at the White House Friday afternoon. A Marine was stationed outside the West Wing, indicating Trump was most likely there.

Amid a huge National Guard presence in D.C. after last week’s MAGA riots in the Capitol, close-up of Lindell’s notes revealed some bizarre snippets about what may be on his mind. Lindell, like Trump, spoke to the rally crowd before Trump supporters invaded the Capitol.

Mike Lindell, CEO of My Pillow, stands outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2021. A closeup of his notes revealed tense topics ranging from martial law to the Insurrection Act and the leadership of the CIA

A Washington Post photographer obtained a close-up of papers carried by Lindell. 

One ominous line said ‘martial law if necessary upon the first hint of any.’ The term does not come without precedent. Former National Security Advisor Mike Flynn spoke openly about it while parroting Trump’s claims of a ‘rigged’ election – and scored his own White House meeting afterward.

Another line, partly obscured by Lindell’s hand, most likely referenced the ‘Insurrection Act’ – the subject of discussion before after the election about use of forces inside the country. It said to ‘Act now as a result of the assault on the  …’

Other lines hinted at recommended staff moves. One might indicate moving ‘Colson NOW as Acting National Security’ – suggesting a staff move atop the National Security Agency. Other language references Fort Mead and a top cybersecurity lawyer, which could identify Frank Colon, who according to his LinkedIn page is an attorney with Cyber Operations 780th Military Intelligence Brigade.

A Washington Post photographer snagged an image of Lindell's notes, which he did not conceal outside the West Wing

A Washington Post photographer snagged an image of Lindell’s notes, which he did not conceal outside the West Wing

The notes also appear to reference potential cabinet moves just days before Trump is to leave office

The notes also appear to reference potential cabinet moves just days before Trump is to leave office

MyPillow CEO speaks at 'Stop the Steal' rally, accuses Fox News of trying to overthrow Trump administration. Following the rally, a MAGA mob ransacked the Capitol

MyPillow CEO speaks at ‘Stop the Steal’ rally, accuses Fox News of trying to overthrow Trump administration. Following the rally, a MAGA mob ransacked the Capitol

There are also references to ‘Kracken’ lawyer Sidney Powell, who oversaw failed election challenges in court and who has been at the White House post-election. 

‘Move Kash Patel to CIA Acting,’ it says, in a line which could indicate a proposal to oust CIA Director Gina Haspel, and put in her place a Trump loyalist recently moved to the Pentagon. 

 Other lines are mere snippets, but they suggest Trump’s obsession with a ‘stolen’ election – although Joe Biden beat him by 7 million votes, or 306 to 232 in the Electoral College.

‘Been with getting the evidence of ALL the … as the election and all information regarding … among people he knows who already have security … done massive research on these issues,’ the notes say.   

‘Foreign Interference in the election Trigger … powers, make clear this is a China/Iran … domestic actors. Instruct Frank,’ it says. 

The notes mention 'Kraken' lawyer Sidney Powell, as well as other individuals

The notes mention ‘Kraken’ lawyer Sidney Powell, as well as other individuals

The meeting comes days after Trump took part in a scripted video where he finally said: ‘A new administration will be inaugurated on January 20.’ But he hasn’t said outright that Joe Biden won, even as Vice President Mike Pence finally called Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and began what appears to be a farewell tour.

Trump has been hunkered down in office, with bizarre White House schedules saying only that: ‘President Trump will work from early in the morning until late in the evening. He will make many calls and have many meetings.’

A message to Lindell was not immediately returned.  

Trump’s obsession with overturning the results are also reflected in charts that could be seen as trade advisor Peter Navarro walked on White House grounds. It said ‘Vote Irregularities and Illegalities by Category and State.’ 

Trump himself is expected to leave D.C. on January 20th, with no plans for the traditional meeting with President-elect Joe Biden. 

The ominous snippets in Lindell’s notes about the election were contradicted by reality on the ground at the White House Friday afternoon. A procession of aides left the building with boxes, even packing away large framed photos that have adorned the building.

A Marine outside the door indicated the president was most likely there

A Marine outside the door indicated the president was most likely there

US President Donald Trump listens as Michael J. Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2020

US President Donald Trump listens as Michael J. Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2020

Lindell's pillow company regularly advertises on Fox News

Lindell’s pillow company regularly advertises on Fox News

Former U.S. national security adviser Michael Flynn speaks during a rally to protest the results of the election, in Washington, U.S., December 12, 2020. He urged martial law in a post-election video

Former U.S. national security adviser Michael Flynn speaks during a rally to protest the results of the election, in Washington, U.S., December 12, 2020. He urged martial law in a post-election video

A viewing platform for the inauguration already has printed signage for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. Biden spoke in Delaware about changes he plans to institute for vaccine rollout, following reports that the Trump Administration Operation Warp Speed name will be one of the first things jettisoned. 

Even lower level aides in the West Wing have already departed, leaving a skeleton crew – even as the nation faced a relentless surge of coronavirus infections and deaths. 

Lindell posted even after the riots with claims about ways to ‘suppress the evil’ and ‘beat the evil’ with claims that Trump supporters ‘broke the algorithms.’

He posted brief comments, which appear to be made aboard a private jet, where he wrote that ‘Donald Trump is going to be your president for the next 4 years.’

Lindell retweeted a tweet by Right Side Broadcasting Network January 10 which bashed the idea of impeachment as pointless. ‘Seems like a whole lot of trouble to go through to impeach someone who, if tradition has its way, will be gone from office in 10 days. What is going on here, Nancy? Seems a little desperate. There must be…other factors at play,’ it said. 

Categories
Headline USA Politics

Fired FBI director James Comey says Biden should consider pardoning Trump for the Capitol riot

Fired FBI director James Comey has said Joe Biden should consider pardoning Donald Trump for the Capitol riot even though the president ‘belongs in jail.’ 

Comey said he was ‘sickened’ by last week’s storming of the Capitol and ‘angered’ by the lax security which allowed the Trump mob to run amok, leaving five people dead.

He argued that impeaching Trump would be ‘good for our country’ and said that the ‘lawless nihilist’ should be ousted from the White House before Joe Biden’s inauguration. 

But he stopped short of calling for a prosecution for Trump, who has previously threatened Comey with ‘many years in jail’ over the Russia report.

‘I obviously think he belongs in jail but I don’t think pursuing that is in the best interest of the entire nation,’ Comey said.

The BBC’s Emily Maitlis asked whether Biden ought to pardon Trump in the same way that Gerald Ford did Richard Nixon after Watergate in 1974.

‘I don’t know, he should at least consider it,’ Comey said. ‘As part of healing the country and getting us to a place where we can focus on things that are going to matter over the next four years, I think Joe Biden is going to have to at least think about that.’ 

Comey said that, although 'Trump isn't a genius,' he would probably figure out that accepting a pardon would be an admission of guilt and choose to reject it

Fired FBI director James Comey last night said Donald Trump ‘should be in jail’ for the riot inside the Capitol but said that Joe Biden should consider pardoning him

Comey said that ousting Trump before Biden's inauguration was the right thing to do, but stopped short of calling for the president to be locked up (Trump pictured outside the White House in September, 2019)

Comey said that ousting Trump before Biden’s inauguration was the right thing to do, but stopped short of calling for the president to be locked up (Trump pictured outside the White House in September, 2019)

Comey, whose new book is out this week, said he believes that Trump ‘might figure out’ that by accepting a pardon he admits guilt and so he would probably reject it. 

After Ford pardoned Nixon, the predecessor made a statement of contrition. 

House Republicans have called Nancy Pelosi’s impeachment effort cynical, political and unnecessarily divisive.  

Comey said those who said such things were ‘not worthy of a response.’

Speaking of last Wednesday’s riot, which saw lawmakers barricaded inside their offices as gunfire sounded on the Hill, Comey called the mob ‘domestic terrorists.’

He said: ‘I was sickened as I hope not just all Americans but all human beings were by an attack on a symbol of democracy, the center of democracy for our country and a symbol for the whole world.

‘And I was also angered as a former law enforcement official. For the life of me I can’t understand why that hill was not adequately defended.

‘I think it’s going to be very important for our country to take a look back as we did after 9/11 and understand what happened and why, so it never happens again.’ 

The FBI has warned of further violence ahead of Biden’s inauguration on January 20, telling their staff to prepare for riots across all 50 states. 

Comey was asked whether the MAGA movement represented an extremist threat.

He replied: ‘There’s a reason the American people associate the red hats with something racist and and that they should be fearful of.

‘It’s probably an exaggeration because there’s so many millions of Americans who are not violent people they’re not racist people they’re just been people who’ve been fooled.’

Maitlis asked: ‘Would you see it as a domestic threat now?’

Comey answered: ‘Oh definitely – I’m not talking about the MAGA movement as a whole but significant aspects of – and you saw it live and on television at Capitol Hill – of those people who consider themselves devotees of Donald Trump are people that I would classify as domestic terrorists.’

Trump earlier this week declared a state of emergency in DC as the police briefed House Democrats on three plots to attack the Capitol – including one described as ‘the largest armed protest in American history.’

Thousands of National Guard troops have been drafted in to secure the Hill and the secret service has launched a massive operation to protect Biden’s inauguration ceremony. 

But Comey, who presided over the agency during two inaugurations, said he had the utmost confidence the ceremony would go ahead undisturbed.

‘This for American security services is the Super Bowl of security,’ he said.

‘We know how to secure to completely lock down a large piece of ground and I’m confident that will be done but at the same time I know the threat is real.’ 

The flash of a police munition lights up the steps of the Capitol during the invasion by a Trump-incited mob on Wednesday

The flash of a police munition lights up the steps of the Capitol during the invasion by a Trump-incited mob on Wednesday 

Members of Congress are seen running for cover as protesters attempted to enter the House Chamber

Members of Congress are seen running for cover as protesters attempted to enter the House Chamber

The protesters used flag poles and other objects to break doors and windows around the Capitol building

The protesters used flag poles and other objects to break doors and windows around the Capitol building  

Hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol on January 6 in a bid to block the certification of Joe Biden's victory

Hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol on January 6 in a bid to block the certification of Joe Biden’s victory

He was pressed on this point and asked why it had been allowed to happen in the first place – the FBI must have been well aware that thousands of Trump supporters were heading to Washington DC.

But while Comey said he was unable to pass judgment on that, he said he believed that the current FBI director Christopher Wray may have deliberately kept a low profile over the last three years to avoid upsetting Trump.

Comey, whose firing led to the Mueller investigation, said: ‘I think the FBI director who followed me has been very careful to maintain a lower profile so that he doesn’t get fired by an erratic president and have the FBI decapitated at a critical time in our nation.

‘I bet he’s thinking that right now, this week it’s important not to let the Eye of Sauron fall on you and and have the FBI director fired.’

The Eye of Sauron refers to the evil all-seeing eye in the Lord of the Rings books by English author J.R.R. Tolkein. 

The former FBI chief said he hoped that Trump would be ignored by the Biden administration and the American people over the next four years.

‘The best decision for the United States of America will be not to grant Donald Trump the platform that prosecuting him would give him for every day for three or four years in the nation’s capital as United States versus Trump.

‘I think the better thing for our country and our new president is to push Donald Trump to the side a bit.

‘I’d rather the TV lights go out and he stand on the lawn at Mar-a-Lago shouting at cars in his bathrobe where none of us can hear that.’ 

Categories
Headlines UK

Donald Trump is impeached for the SECOND TIME after bipartisan vote

The House voted Wednesday 232-197 to impeach President Donald Trump for a second time for ‘incitement of insurrection,’ exactly a week after the MAGA mob stormed Capitol Hill.  

The Democratic majority was joined by 10 Republicans, making the House’s move bipartisan – unlike Trump’s first impeachment less than 13 months ago.  

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said that he would not bring the Senate back before January 19, the day before President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration. It means that Trump cannot be removed from office before he leaves anyway. 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED ‘YES’ ON IMPEACHMENT

Liz Cheney – Wyoming. Republican royalty and House Number 3

‘There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.’ 

Adam Kinzinger – Illinois. Outspoken Trump critic and Air Force veteran

‘If these actions are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?’

John Katko – New York. Holds swing district and co-chairs moderate group

‘To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy.’ 

Fred Upton – Michigan. 14-term rep who co-chairs moderate group 

‘It is time to say: Enough is enough.’

Jaime Herrera Beutler  – Washington

Five-term rep in deep blue state 

‘The President of the United States incited a riot. That riot led to five deaths.’ 

Dan Newhouse – Washington

One of only two GOP reps from state 

‘Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republican is not an option.’ 

Peter Meijer – Michigan 

Holds Gerald Ford’s seat  

‘There was no such courage from our President who betrayed and misled millions.’ 

Tom Rice – South Carolina 

Still to explain vote 

Anthony Gonzalez  – Ohio 

‘The President of the United States helped organize and incite a mob that attacked the United States Congress in an attempt to prevent us from completing our solemn duties.’

Former NFL starting wide receiver 

David Valadao – California 

‘His inciting rhetoric was un-American, abhorrent, and absolutely an impeachable offense. It’s time to put country over politics.’ 

Reclaimed district from Dems in 2020

McConnell’s move was revealed as the House debated the impeachment article. Then he added to the drama with a statement suggesting he could convict, saying: ‘While the press has been full of speculation, I have not made a final decision on how I will vote and I intend to listen to the legal arguments when they are presented to the Senate.’ 

Just before he entered history as the first president to be impeached twice, the White House put out a statement from Trump, which called for peace but did not address his impeachment.

‘In light of reports of more demonstrations, I urge that there must be NO violence, NO lawbreaking and NO vandalism of any kind. That is not what I stand for, and it is not what America stands for. I call on ALL Americans to help ease tensions and calm tempers. Thank You,’ the president’s statement said. 

The call for calm did nothing to quell a Republican rebellion against him, led by the House number three Liz Cheney, which ended with a total of 10 GOP members voting to impeach Trump.

Halfway through the debate another defiant Republican, Rep. Dan Newhouse of Washington, said: ‘Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republic is not an option.

‘A vote against impeachment is a vote to validate this unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation’s capital. It is also a vote to condone President Trump’s inaction. He did not strongly condemn the attack nor did he call in reinforcements when our officers were overwhelmed.’ 

‘Our country needed a leader and President Trump failed to fulfill his oath of office,’ Newhouse added. His floor speech got Democratic applause.

The 10 votes make the impeachment the most bipartisan ever, another historical marker which also creates a deep split in the Republican party which is unlikely to end with Trump’s departure. 

The vote ended with Nancy Pelosi, the House Speaker, in the chair, declaring the count of 232 to 197 – but with silence from the Democrats and handful of Republicans still present. Pelosi had warned her members not to celebrate the outcome.

It concluded a day of debate in which Pelosi had called Trump a ‘clear and present danger,’ as Democrats said they were standing in a ‘crime scene’ and demanded that Trump pay a price for a campaign of ‘lies and conspiracy theories’ which had fomented violence.  

Trump’s Republican allies did not defend Trump’s behavior, but instead pitched censuring the president or launching a 9/11-style commission, more fitting punishments they argued for someone who was already leaving office. 

Rep. Chip Roy, a Texas Republican, went as far to say Trump’s conduct was impeachable, but wouldn’t vote for the article, calling it ‘flawed.’  

The Republican revolt was led by Cheney, the number three in the caucus and party royalty as the daughter of the former vice president Dick Cheney.

She had issued a fiery denunciation of Trump when she announced her vote 24 hours earlier, saying he ‘lit the flame on insurrection’ but did not speak on the floor.

In the Senate, which will have to hold a trial of Trump in the wake of the vote as soon as it receives the article, McConnell’s announcement that he is willing to convict raises new questions about how Republicans will vote when the trial happens.

So far only Sen. Mitt Romney appears certain to back conviction, while on Wednesday Sen. Lindsey Graham accused McConnell of risking more violence by backing impeachment. No other Republican senator has made their position public. 

Impeachment is by a two-thirds majority of the Senate, which in principle means the 50 Democrats have to be joined by 17 Republicans, but in fact it is only a majority of those present, meaning some GOP members could stay away to let a vote go through without actively taking part.  

In a statement, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer continued to push McConnell to reconvene the Senate sooner – but said there would be a trial no matter what.

‘A Senate trial can begin immediately, with agreement from the current Senate Majority Leader to reconvene the Senate for an emergency session, or it will begin after January 19th,’ Schumer said. 

‘But make no mistake, there will be an impeachment trial in the United States Senate; there will be a vote on convicting the president for high crimes and misdemeanors; and if the president is convicted, there will be a vote on barring him from running again.’ 

Bringing down the hammer: Nancy Pelosi gavels the end of the voting and declares that Donald Trump has been impeached again 232-197 – 10 of the majority votes coming from Republicans

The article of impeachment against President Donald Trump sits on a table before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at an engrossment ceremony after Wednesday's vote

The article of impeachment against President Donald Trump sits on a table before House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at an engrossment ceremony after Wednesday’s vote 

Photographers lean over the article of impeachment Wednesday on Capitol Hill trying to get a good shot before an engrossment ceremony with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi

Photographers lean over the article of impeachment Wednesday on Capitol Hill trying to get a good shot before an engrossment ceremony with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi 

Republican House number three Liz Cheney (right) led 10 of the House GOP into voting for impeachment - but is now facing a backlash from Trump ultra-loyalists. She was see n speaking to Jamie Raskin, one of the key Democrats pushing for Trump's impeachment and removal

Republican House number three Liz Cheney (right) led 10 of the House GOP into voting for impeachment – but is now facing a backlash from Trump ultra-loyalists. She was see n speaking to Jamie Raskin, one of the key Democrats pushing for Trump’s impeachment and removal 

READ THE FULL ARTICLE OF IMPEACHMENT 

IMPEACHMENT TIMETABLE

Wednesday afternoon: House passed single Article

What happens next? Nancy Pelosi decides when to transmit Article to Senate. When she does, it must begin trial on the next sitting day and sit six days a week until it concludes 

Tuesday January 19:  Earliest date Mitch McConnell has said Senate can begin considering Article. Senate procedures may mean trial will not begin until the following day at 1pm

Wednesday January 20, noon: Trump leaves office

What happens next? If a trial is under way, it can continue. Most legal experts say if it has not begun, it can, but there is a minority who say impeachment cannot continue if the president is not in office

Rep. Tom Cole, the first GOP lawmaker to speak, argued against a hasty impeachment vote ‘not because of the president’s inappropriate and reckless words are deserving of defense but because the presidency itself demands due process.’ Cole had himself voted to overturn the election results.

Republicans also warned impeaching Trump for a second time would only make partisan hostilities worse.  

‘This is a reckless impeachment,’ complained Republican Rep. Jason Smith of Missouri. ‘This will only bring up the hate and fire more than ever before.’ 

Republican Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona charged Democrats with wanting ‘complete destruction of your nemesis.’

‘Instead of stopping the Trump train, his movement will go stronger, for you would have made him a martyr,’ Biggs warned. 

Democrats described the terror of last week’s attack. 

‘We are debating this resolution at an actual crime scene and we wouldn’t be here if not for the president of the United States,’ said Rep. Jim McGovern, a Massachusetts Democrat.

‘People were sending text messages to their loved ones, telling them they loved them. They thought they were saying goodbye,’ he added.  

Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin, the House’s lead impeachment manager, referred to the rioters as a ‘bloodthirsty mob.’   

‘They wounded dozens of people, hospitalizing dozens of people,’ he said. ‘They may have been hunting for Pence and Pelosi to stage their coup, but every one of us in this room right now, could have died.’

Rep. Joaquin Castro echoed Raskin’s description. 

‘Let me ask you a question? What do you think they would have done if they had gotten in? What do you think they would have done to you? And who do you think sent them here?’ he asked his fellow members. ‘The most dangerous man to ever occupy the Oval Office.’ 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, speaking to an InstagramLive audience Tuesday night since she was proxy voting, said, ‘I can tell you that I had a very close encounter where I thought I was going to die.’ 

‘I did not know if I was going to make it to the end of that day alive,’ the high-profile progressive lawmaker said.  

On the floor Wednesday, the Democrats pointed to the Republicans’ high-profile defection: the No. 3 House Republican, Cheney. 

Cheney, the Republican Conference Chair, laced into Trump in her statement, saying he ‘lit the flame’ of insurrection – and Democrats repeated her words back to the Republicans. 

The House's No. 3 Democrat, Rep. Jim Clyburn, walks into the Capitol Building surrounded by members of the National Guard

The House’s No. 3 Democrat, Rep. Jim Clyburn, walks into the Capitol Building surrounded by members of the National Guard 

Armed National Guard troops are seen outside the U.S. Capitol Building as members inside debate impeaching President Donald Trump for a second time in 13 months

Armed National Guard troops are seen outside the U.S. Capitol Building as members inside debate impeaching President Donald Trump for a second time in 13 months

Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, a top Trump ally, speaks on the House floor Wednesday as impeachment proceedings began

Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, a top Trump ally, speaks on the House floor Wednesday as impeachment proceedings began 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO VOTED ‘YES’ ON IMPEACHMENT

Liz Cheney – Wyoming. Republican royalty and House Number 3

‘There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.’ 

Adam Kinzinger – Illinois. Outspoken Trump critic and Air Force veteran

‘If these actions are not worthy of impeachment, then what is an impeachable offense?’

John Katko – New York. Holds swing district and co-chairs moderate group

‘To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy.’ 

Fred Upton – Michigan. 14-term rep who co-chairs moderate group 

‘It is time to say: Enough is enough.’

Jaime Herrera Beutler  – Washington

Five-term rep in deep blue state 

‘The President of the United States incited a riot. That riot led to five deaths.’ 

Dan Newhouse – Washington

One of only two GOP reps from state 

‘Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republican is not an option.’ 

Peter Meijer – Michigan 

Holds Gerald Ford’s seat  

‘There was no such courage from our President who betrayed and misled millions.’ 

Tom Rice – South Carolina 

Still to explain vote 

Anthony Gonzalez  – Ohio 

‘The President of the United States helped organize and incite a mob that attacked the United States Congress in an attempt to prevent us from completing our solemn duties.’

Former NFL starting wide receiver 

David Valadao – California 

‘His inciting rhetoric was un-American, abhorrent, and absolutely an impeachable offense. It’s time to put country over politics.’ 

Reclaimed district from Dems in 2020

‘There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,’ she said.

The decision to back impeachment by Cheney, a member of Republican royalty as the daughter of Dick Cheney, and seen as a future contender for the party’s House leadership and the Speaker’s chair, means that impeachment would be bipartisan.  

On the floor Wednesday, Democrats pointed to Cheney’s statement as evidence they were in the right. 

The Democrats’ No. 2, Rep. Steny Hoyer, recited Cheney’s words during his turn to speak. 

‘That is not some irresponsible new member of Congress of the United States,’ Hoyer said. ‘This is the daughter of the former Republican whip and former vice president of the United States of America.’ 

‘She knows of which she speaks,’ Hoyer argued. 

Cheney never gave her own floor speech.  

Reps. Jim Jordan and Paul Gosar, two of Trump’s top GOP House allies, were pushing to have Cheney removed from her leadership position. 

JIM JORDAN SAYS DEMOCRATS WANT TO ‘CANCEL’ THE PRESIDENT 

Jordan gave two fiery floor speeches Wednesday.   

He yelled ’19 minutes!’ into the microphone Wednesday afternoon, charging Democrats with waiting just 19 minutes into the Trump administration to start their impeachment hunt.   

He said Democrats were pursuing removal again because of ‘politics and the fact that they want to, they want to cancel the president.’ 

‘This is about getting the president of the United States,’ Jordan said. 

‘They spied on his campaign before he was elected, 19 minutes into his presidency they started the impeachment push, three year Mueller investigation, 19 lawyers, 40 agents, 500 witnesses, 2,500 subpoenas, $40 million to find nothing,’ Jordan went on. 

The Ohio Republican said impeachment ’round one’ was based on information from a ‘biased’ whistleblower. 

‘Now it’s impeachment round two,’ he said. ‘It’s always been about getting the president, no matter what. It’s an obsession, an obsession that’s now broadened. It’s not just about impeachment anymore it’s about canceling … canceling the president,’ Jordan argued. 

‘IT BREAKS MY HEART’ SAYS HOUSE SPEAKER NANCY PELOSI 

Pelosi, who opened the formal impeachment articles debate, said she wasn’t pursuing the measure with glee. 

‘It gives me no pleasure to say this, it breaks my heart. It should break your heart. It should break all of our hearts,’ the top Democrat said. 

Pelosi encouraged the Senate to act, calling the president a ‘clear and present danger.’ 

‘I believe the president must be convicted by the Senate, a constitutional  remedy that will ensure that the republic will be safe from this man, that was so resolutely determined to tear down the things that we hold dear, and hold us together,’ she said.  

She also slammed those who engaged in the riot. 

‘Those insurrectionists were not patriots. They were not part of a political base to be catered to and managed. They were domestic terrorists and justice must prevail,’ the House speaker said. 

TOP HOUSE REPUBLICAN SAYS ANTIFA NOT RESPONSIBLE 

Pelosi’s Republican counterpart, House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, let other, more pro-Trump members speak before he took a turn on the floor, where he cleared up some right-wing misinformation. 

‘Some say the riots were caused by Antifa,’ McCarthy said. ‘There is absolutely no evidence of that. And conservatives should be the first to say so,’ he advised. 

McCarthy said he planned to vote no on impeachment because it was too hasty. 

‘I believe impeaching the president in such a short timeframe would be a mistake,’ McCarthy argued. ‘No investigations have been completed. No hearings have been held.’  

‘What’s more, the Senate has confirmed that no trial will begin until after President-Elect Biden is sworn in,’ McCarthy added, a nod to the breaking McConnell news. 

TRUMP’S TOP ALLIES POINT FINGERS BACK AT DEMOCRATS 

Most of the Republicans lining up to speak were Trump hard-liners – and pointed to what they considered to be Democratic hypocrisy. 

‘The left in America has incited far more political violence than the right for months. Our cities burned police stations burned or businesses were shattered. And they said nothing,’ Rep. Matt Gaetz yelled. 

‘Well they lit actual flames. Actual fires,’ Gaetz exclaimed. 

That comment cued boos from the Democratic side.  

Rep. Ken Buck compared the capitol assault to Trump administration officials being harassed at restaurants. 

‘The press secretary Sarah Sanders was kicked out of a restaurant for being a Trump employee, the DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen harassed at her home,’ Buck said on the floor. 

Nielsen was confronted by a crowd at a D.C. restaurant over the Trump administration’s child separation policy.

Rep. Lauren Boebert, who has openly supported the QAnon conspiracy theory, called for ‘accountability on the left.’

‘After encouraging and normalizing violence,’ she said. 

‘I call bull crap when I hear the Democrats demanding unity. Sadly they are only unified in hate,’ she blasted.   

the other ‘QAnon congresswoman,’ Rep. Marjorie Taylor Green gave her floor remarks wearing a ‘CENSORED’ mask.

Rep. Brian Mast, a Florida Republican, used a dramatic pause to make his point. 

‘Has any one of those individuals who brought violence on this capitol been brought here to answer whether they did that because of our president?’ Mast asked. 

He stood unanswered for 30 seconds until his time elapsed. ‘It appears I will receive no answer,’ he said.

Rep. Dan Newhouse, a Republican from Washington state, became the sixth GOP member to say he would vote to impeach President Donald Trump

Rep. Dan Newhouse, a Republican from Washington state, became the sixth GOP member to say he would vote to impeach President Donald Trump 

(SOME) REPUBLICANS REVOLT 

Joining Cheney in voting for the Democratic-prepared article of impeachment was Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, John Katko of New York,  Fred Upton of Michigan,  Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington, Rep. Dan Newhouse of Washington,  Peter Meijer of Michigan, Tom Rice of South Carolina and Anthony Gonzalez of Ohio.  

‘My vote to impeach our sitting president is not a fear-based decision,’ Herrera Beutler said during her floor speech. ‘I am not choosing a side I am choosing, it’s the only way to defeat fear.’   

Newhouse announced Wednesday mid-debate that he would vote yes on impeachment. 

‘Turning a blind eye to this brutal assault on our Republic is not an option,’ Newhouse said.

‘A vote against impeachment is a vote to validate this unacceptable violence we witnessed in our nation’s capital,’ Newhouse said in a statement. ‘It is also a vote to condone President Trump’s inaction. He did not strongly condemn the attack nor did he call in reinforcements when our officers were overwhelmed.’ 

‘Our country needed a leader and President Trump failed to fulfill his oath of office,’ Newhouse added. 

His remarks were applauded on the House floor.

Cheney’s decision came minutes after McConnell was revealed to believe that Trump had committed impeachable offenses.

The New York Times’ bombshell was still echoing in Washington D.C. when the House started its 25th Amendment debate – and as it dragged to a close Tuesday night, Axios reported that McConnell was leaning towards a vote to convict the president and was ‘more than 50/50’ on it.  

Cheney was seen speaking to Raskin on Tuesday night as he led the Democrats arguing for a resolution urging Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment removing Trump from power.

The House passed it late Tuesday despite Pence sending a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying he’ll refuse. 

Hundreds of National Guard troops wer sleeping on the stone floor of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning as security in Washington intensified a week out from Joe Biden's inauguration

Hundreds of National Guard troops wer sleeping on the stone floor of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning as security in Washington intensified a week out from Joe Biden’s inauguration 

The troops could be seen spreading out inside the Rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

The troops could be seen spreading out inside the Rotunda of the US Capitol on Wednesday morning

The troops cradled their weapons and huddled together as they slept inside the Capitol on Wednesday

The troops cradled their weapons and huddled together as they slept inside the Capitol on Wednesday 

In a vote that wrapped up around 11.30pm Tuesday, the House voted 223-205 to approve the resolution, which can’t actually force the vice president’s hand.   

‘I do not believe that such a course of action is in the best interest of our Nation or consistent with the Constitution,’ Pence said in his letter to Pelosi, refusing to pull the trigger on the 25th. 

‘Last week, I did not yield to pressure to exert beyond my constitutional authority to determine the outcome of the election, and I will not now yield to efforts in the House of Representatives to play political games at a time so serious in the life of our Nation,’ Pence added. 

Pence’s letter came as the House was holding procedural votes on the resolution.   

No Republicans joined on until the final vote – with Rep. Adam Kinzinger joining Democrats in the push to have Pence to use the 25th.  

Trump ultra-loyalist Jim Jordan says he will try to oust Liz Cheney from her position as party’s House number three in revenge for voting to impeach president 

Jim Jordan said he wanted Republicans to remove Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership position over her push to impeach President Donald Trump

‘I think she’s, I think she’s totally wrong,’ Jordan said. ‘The conference should have a second vote on that,’ the Ohio Republican told reporters, saying he believed lawmakers should get a say on removing Cheney from her No. 3 position. 

Republican Rep. Paul Gosar, another top Trump ally, was circulating a petition to GOP members pushing for Cheney’s removal, C-SPAN and CNN reported.   

The House Republican caucus held leadership elections for the 117th Congress on November 17, two weeks after Election Day. 

Cheney, again, was selected to be the Republican Conference chairman, and ran for the position unopposed. 

On Tuesday she announced she would side the the Democratic majority and vote to impeach Trump for ‘incitement of insurrection.’ 

In an explosive statement, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney laced into Trump saying he ‘lit the flame’ of insurrection. 

‘There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,’ Cheney said.  

Four other GOP House members have said they will vote for Trump’s impeachment: Reps. Adam Kinzinger, Fred Upton, John Katko and Jaime Herrera Beutler. 

Speaking to Capitol Hill reporters, Jordan was unsure if there was a mechanism to push a member out of leadership.

‘I don’t know about that – it’s just where I’m at,’ he told the press.   

When asked if the conservative Freedom Caucus, of which Jordan is a leader, was supportive of pushing Cheney out, Jordan replied sarcastically, ‘What do you think?’ 

‘You know the answer. You know the answer to that question,’ he went on. ‘Of course.’ 

Jordan was also asked if Republicans had a ‘cohesive leaderhip team’ with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Cheney appearing to be in direct conflict. ‘Leader McCarthy and whip Scalise have done a great job,’ Jordan answered.

Rep. Steve Scalise is the No. 2 Republican in the House of Representatives.  Jordan was recently given a Presidential Medal of Freedom behind closed doors by Trump.  Both voted to overturn the election. 

That set the scene for an impeachment debate and vote Wednesday entirely different from the first impeachment vote on October 31, 2019.

Then the only non-Democratic vote was from Justin Amash, who was essentially forced out of the Republican party before he even cast it.

But after a day in which they feared for their lives, the mood in Congress had changed rapidly.

LINDSEY GRAHAM IN BITTER PUBLIC SPLIT WITH MITCH MCCONNELL OVER IMPEACHMENT

Lindsey Graham slammed Mitch McConnell and other Republican leaders in the Senate on Wednesday as the House began debate to impeach President Donald Trump a second time.

In a lengthy statement, delivered the day after Graham traveled to Texas with President Trump to visit a new section of the border wall, the senator argued: ‘The last thing the country needs is an impeachment trial of a president who is leaving office in one week.’

Graham, a staunch Trump ally, warned another impeachment trial ‘could invite further violence’ and decried Democrats for wanting to do a ‘do-over impeachment.’

Senator Lindsey Graham jumped back on the Trump plane - literally - on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas

Senator Lindsey Graham jumped back on the Trump plane – literally – on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas

‘The House impeachment process seeks to legitimize a snap impeachment totally void of due process. No hearings. No witnesses. It is a rushed process that, over time, will become a threat to future presidents. As to Senate leadership, I fear they are making the problem worse, not better,’ he said. 

Graham jumped back on the Trump plane – literally – on Tuesday as he accompanied the president on Air Force One to Texas.

Senator Lindsey Graham Statement 

‘Supporting the impeachment of President Trump under these circumstances will do great damage to the institutions of government and could invite further violence at a time the President is calling for calm. If there was a time for America’s political leaders to bend a knee and ask for God’s counsel and guidance, it is now. The most important thing for leaders to do in times of crisis is to make things better, not worse.

‘The process being used in the House to impeach President Trump is an affront to any concept of due process and will further divide the country. The President, who will be leaving office in less than a week, has committed to an orderly transfer of power, encouraging calm and rejecting violence.

‘The House impeachment process seeks to legitimize a snap impeachment totally void of due process. No hearings. No witnesses. It is a rushed process that, over time, will become a threat to future presidents. As to Senate leadership, I fear they are making the problem worse, not better.

‘The last thing the country needs is an impeachment trial of a president who is leaving office in one week.

‘Democrats have already impeached the President once over a matter which was not worthy of that process. Now they seek to do it again, believing that this effort will wash for history the fact that the first impeachment was based on the thinnest of pretenses: a phone call with the leader of Ukraine. Impeachment should never be a ‘do-over,’ but that is what Democrats are seeking to do today.

‘To my Republican colleagues who legitimize this process, you are doing great damage not only to the country, the future of the presidency, but also to the party. The millions who have supported President Trump and his agenda should not be demonized because of the despicable actions of a seditious mob. The individuals who participated in the storming of the Capitol should be met with the full force of the law. They should and will be held accountable.’

The trip comes after Graham broke with the president last Wednesday, refusing to join a Trump-backed effort to contest Electoral College counts in the hours after the MAGA riot. 

‘All I can say is count me out, enough is enough,’ Graham told his Senate colleagues then. ‘When it’s over it is over.’   

But his tune changed.

Graham on Wednesday called out Republicans who are voting for impeachment. Ten Republican House members supported impeaching Trump under the charge he violated his oath of office by inciting the mob of insurgents that attacked the Capitol on Wednesday.

‘To my Republican colleagues who legitimize this process, you are doing great damage not only to the country, the future of the presidency, but also to the party,’ Graham said. 

The House approved the articles of impeachment against Trump on Wednesday afternoon, 232-197.

Republican leaders in the Senate were weighing whether to launch a trial on Friday to consider removing him from office, a source familiar with the deliberations told Reuters.

But Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell ruled it out.

‘Given the rules, procedures, and Senate precedents that govern presidential impeachment trials, there is simply no chance that a fair or serious trial could conclude before President-elect Biden is sworn in next week. The Senate has held three presidential impeachment trials. They have lasted 83 days, 37 days, and 21 days respectively,’ he said in a statement after the House vote.

‘Even if the Senate process were to begin this week and move promptly, no final verdict would be reached until after President Trump had left office. This is not a decision I am making; it is a fact. The President-elect himself stated last week that his inauguration on January 20 is the ‘quickest’ path for any change in the occupant of the presidency,’ he noted.

He said the trial would begin after Biden took the oath of office. 

‘In light of this reality, I believe it will best serve our nation if Congress and the executive branch spend the next seven days completely focused on facilitating a safe inauguration and an orderly transfer of power to the incoming Biden Administration,’ McConnell said.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer had pressured McConnell to agree to bring the Senate back sooner under emergency circumstances – to no avail. 

That means the first days of Biden’s presidency will be taken up with impeaching his predecessor. 

If impeached, Trump would not be able to run for president again. Several Republican senators are thought to be considering 2024 presidential bids.

To impeach Trump, a two-thirds majority is needed to convict him.

 

 

 

Rep. Jim Jordan, an Ohio Republican, criticized the Democrats' effort to have Vice President Mike Pence utilize the 25th Amendment. He also complained about the House's new fines for lawmakers who don't wear masks - and the metal detectors outside the House chamber

Rep. Jim Jordan, an Ohio Republican, criticized the Democrats’ effort to have Vice President Mike Pence utilize the 25th Amendment. He also complained about the House’s new fines for lawmakers who don’t wear masks – and the metal detectors outside the House chamber 

HOW TRUMP’S SECOND IMPEACHMENT WILL UNFOLD

The House is expected to impeach President Donald Trump for his encouragement of supporters who stormed the U.S. Capitol, a vote that would make him the first American president to be impeached twice.

While the previous three impeachments – those of Presidents Andrew Johnson, Bill Clinton and Trump – took months before a final vote, including investigations and hearings, this time it will have only taken a week. After the rioting at the Capitol, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said ‘we must take action,’ and Democrats – and some Republicans – share her view ahead of Wednesday’s vote. 

For now, the Republican-led Senate is not expected to hold a trial and vote on whether to convict Trump before Democrat Joe Biden is sworn in as president Jan. 20. Still, Democrats feel that action by the House would send an important message to the country.

A look at what will happen as the House moves closer to impeaching Trump in his last week in office:

THE BASICS OF IMPEACHMENT: 

In normal order, there would be an impeachment investigation and the evidence would be sent to the House Judiciary Committee, which would hold hearings, draft articles and send them to the full House. That’s what happened in 2019, when the House impeached Trump over his dealings with the president of Ukraine. It took three months.

This time, with so few days to act – and a feeling among Democrats that there is little need to investigate what happened, since most members of Congress heard Trump speak to his supporters and were in the Capitol when the mob broke in – impeachment is going straight to the House floor for a vote, which would come as soon as Wednesday.

Once the House votes to impeach, the articles and evidence would be sent to the Senate, where a trial would be held and there would be final votes to convict or acquit. That’s what the Senate did in early February of last year after Trump was impeached the first time. 

THE ARTICLES

Democrats will begin debate Wednesday on a single impeachment charge: ‘incitement of insurrection.’

‘President Trump gravely endangered the security of the United States and its institutions of Government,’ reads the four-page impeachment article, which was introduced by Democratic Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Ted Lieu of California and Jamie Raskin of Maryland.

‘He will remain a threat to national security, democracy, and the Constitution if allowed to remain in office,’ it reads.

The article says the behavior is consistent with Trump’s prior efforts to ‘subvert and obstruct’ the results of the election and references his recent call with the Georgia secretary of state, in which he said he wanted him to find him more votes after losing the state to Biden.

Trump has falsely claimed there was widespread fraud in the election, and the baseless claims have been repeatedly echoed by congressional Republicans and the insurgents who descended on the Capitol. Just before the riots, Trump spoke to the supporters near the White House and encouraged them to ‘fight like hell.’

As the protesters broke in, both chambers were debating GOP challenges to the electoral vote count in Arizona as part of the process for certifying Biden’s election win. 

REPUBLICAN SUPPORT 

On Tuesday, five Republicans said they would support impeachment. No Republicans supported Trump’s first impeachment in 2019.

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming, the No. 3 Republican in the House and the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, said she would vote to impeach Trump because ‘there has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.’

Cheney said Trump ‘summoned’ the mob that attacked the Capitol last week, ‘assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack.’

New York Rep. John Katko was the first Republican to say he’d vote to impeach. A former federal prosecutor, he said he did not make the decision lightly.

‘To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy,’ Katko said. ‘I cannot sit by without taking action.’

Also saying they would vote for impeachment were Reps. Adam Kinzinger of Illinois, Fred Upton of Michigan and Jaime Herrera Beutler of Washington.

SENDING TO THE SENATE 

Once the House passes the articles, Pelosi can decide when she sends them to the Senate. Under the current schedule, the Senate is not set to resume full sessions until Jan. 19, which is the day before Biden’s inauguration.

Some Democrats suggested Pelosi might wait to send the articles and allow Biden to begin his term without impeachment hanging over him. But many other Democrats have urged Pelosi to move immediately.

Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who will be in charge once Biden is sworn in, suggested in a letter to colleagues Tuesday the chamber might divide its time between confirming Biden’s nominees, approving COVID relief and conducting the trial.

If the trial isn’t held until Trump is already out of office, it could still have the effect of preventing him from running for president again.

Biden has said it’s important to ensure that the ‘folks who engaged in sedition and threatening the lives, defacing public property, caused great damage — that they be held accountable.’

SENATE POLITICS

It’s unlikely, for now, that enough Republicans would vote to convict, since two-thirds of the Senate is needed. Yet some Republicans have told Trump to resign, including Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey and Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, and few are defending him.

Republican Sen. Ben Sasse has said he would take a look at what the House approves, but stopped short of committing to support it.

Other Republicans have said that impeachment would be divisive. South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham, long a key ally of the president, has been critical of his behavior in inciting the riots but said impeachment ‘will do far more harm than good.’

Only one Republican voted to convict Trump last year — Utah Sen. Mitt Romney.

WHAT IMPEACHMENT WOULD MEAN

Democrats say they have to move forward, even if the Senate doesn’t convict.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders tweeted on Friday that some people might ask why they would try to impeach a president with only a few days left in office.

‘The answer: Precedent,’ he said. ‘It must be made clear that no president, now or in the future, can lead an insurrection against the U.S. government.’     

In the hours after the riot, Pence did his Constitutional duty and certified President-elect Joe Biden, something he had been pressured by Trump not to do. 

‘You can either go down in history as a patriot,’ Trump had told Pence by phone before he headed to the Capitol Wednesday, according to The New York Times. ‘Or you can go down in history as a p****.’   

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell signaled his support for impeachment, The New York Times reported Tuesday evening

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell signaled his support for impeachment, The New York Times reported Tuesday evening 

Pence was inside when the violent mobbed attacked, with some Trump supporters calling out, ‘Hang Mike Pence.’  

The Times reported that Trump had invited Pence to the Oval Office Monday night to try to smooth things over in the run-up to the House’s 25th Amendment vote. 

The official description of the meeting was ‘good,’ according to the newspaper. 

Unofficially sources called it ‘nonsubstantive’ and ‘stilted.’  

Tuesday night’s vote on the 25th Amendment is considered the appetizer for Wednesday’s main course: the House pursuing impeachment again. 

Nowhere in his letter did Pence say he objected to that move.   

Shortly after Pence sent out his letter, Pelosi sent out the names of impeachment managers. 

She picked Raskin, who introduced the 25th Amendment resolution, as the head manager. 

‘I think every member of this body should be able to agree that this president is not meeting the most minimal duties of office,’ Raskin argued Tuesday night. 

Raskin also warned his fellow lawmakers that Trump could pardon the Capitol Hill attackers during his waning days. 

Raskin, a Maryland Democrat, recently lost his son. 

Additionally, Democratic Reps. Diana DeGette, David Cicilline, Joaquin Castro, Eric Swalwell, Ted Lieu, Stacey Plaskett, Joe Neguse and Madeleine Dean were also chosen.  

Earlier Tuesday, McConnell signaled his support for the impeachment effort that includes an article charging the president with ‘incitement of insurrection.’

The view of the GOP powerbroker emerged shortly before Rep. Liz Cheney, a member of the House GOP leadership, announced that she would vote for impeaching President Trump.  

‘On January 6, 2021 a violent mob attacked the United States Capitol to obstruct the process of our democracy and stop the counting of presidential electoral votes. This insurrection caused injury, death and destruction in the most sacred space in our Republic,’ wrote Cheney, the daughter of the former vice president.

‘Much more will become clear in coming days and weeks, but what we know now is enough. The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack. Everything that followed was his doing. None of this would have happened without the President. The President could have immediately and forcefully intervened to stop the violence. He did not. There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution,’ she continued.

‘I will vote to impeach the President,’ Cheney concluded.   

Neither Cheney nor McConnell backed Democrats impeachment effort a year ago.  

McConnell worked successfully to scuttle the impeachment effort during a trial last year on different charges. 

His current view follows reports that McConnell never wants to speak to Trump again after the Capitol riots that had Trump supporters invading the Capitol, trashing leadership offices, and endangering the lives of lawmakers.

McConnell backs the effort because it will make it easier to purge Trump from the party, the New York Times reports.

One feature of impeachment – which can grind the Senate to a halt and lead to furious partisan arguments – is that it allows lawmakers to vote to prohibit the person being impeached from ever holding public office with the U.S. government.

Trump may run for president in 2024, and many of his potential rivals happen to hold Senate seats.  

McConnell has made clear in private discussions that ‘now is the moment to move on the weakened lame duck, whom he blames for Republicans losing the Senate,’ according to the report.

Trump ignored McConnell’s advice and launched his election challenge despite two run-off elections in Georgia which the GOP lost – stripping the party of its majority. 

A source told CNN McConnell ‘hates’ Trump and is ‘furious’ with him after the Capitol riots. 

The siege left five people dead, including a U.S. Capitol Police officer who was based on the Senate side.  

McConnell’s wife, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, quit the Trump cabinet after the riots, which included an angry mob getting blocked steps from the door to the Senate chamber that McConnell uses when he normally strolls from his leadership office.  

McConnell’s view emerged as Trump, rather than express contrition, called impeachment a ‘hoax’ and a ‘witch hunt,’ and defended his pre-riot comments that Democrats have already said was incitement. Trump called his speech minutes before the siege ‘totally appropriate.’         

Cheney’s statement denouncing the president comes after Trump told supporters they need to ‘get rid’ of people like her. 

‘We got to get rid of the weak Congresspeople, the ones that aren’t any good, the Liz Cheneys of the world. We got to get rid of them,’ Trump said.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi praised her, amid speculation numerous House Republicans might follow her lead. 

‘Good for her for honoring her oath of us. Would that more Republicans would honor their oaths of office,’ Pelosi said. 

GOP Rep. John Katko also announced he would back impeachment Tuesday night. 

‘To allow the president of the United States to incite this attack without consequence is a direct threat to the future of our democracy,’ Katko said in a statement, Syracuse.com reported. ‘For that reason, I cannot sit by without taking action. I will vote to impeach this president,’ he said. 

During floor debate, Katko said he wasn’t supporting the 25th Amendment resolution because it was ‘non-binding,’ calling it ‘merely a symbolic gesture.’  

Katko confirmed his plans to vote for impeachment. 

Michigan Republican Rep. Fred Upton also told Forbes he would vote to impeach. 

As midnight approached, Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler also said she was a yes.   

Convicting Trump on an impeachment article requires a two-thirds vote of the Senate, where Republicans hold 50 votes – a high bar to meet.  

Assuming passage in the House, it has not been determined when Democratic leaders will transmit the impeachment article, or when the Senate might take it up. 

A McConnell memo that emerged over the weekend cited scheduling challenges for impeachment – a trial might not even begin until after Jan. 19th, since the Senate is not in session. 

President-elect Joe Biden said Monday there was the possibility of dual-tracking an impeachment and Senate session that would be needed to get his cabinet confirmed.

Biden phoned McConnell on Monday, according to the Times on the subject of a trial, and McConnell said he would consult the Senate parliamentarian and get back. 

There are Senate rules and precedents governing impeachment, but leaders also might be able to negotiate a way to handle it, with the possibility of a special impeachment committee taking up some of the burden. 

Trump has continued his usual pattern of lashing out at political adversaries when under attack. 

‘Free speech is under assault like never before. The 25th Amendment is of zero risk to me, but will come back to haunt Joe Biden and the Biden Administration. As the expression goes, be careful what you wish for,’ Trump said Tuesday, before lawmakers cast their votes Tuesday night.  

Post-riot accounts from last Wednesday reveal that not only did President Trump egg on supporters who wreaked havoc in the Capitol – but he was glued to the television as the events unfolded, incapable of responding to desperate pleas to use influence to stop it and enjoying seeing it unfold. 

There were two major areas where the president fell dramatically short of what was being asked of him: using his personal popularity with his followers to urge them to vacate the Capitol immediately; and using the vast powers of his office to try to speed a federal response. 

But when key current and former aides and family members tried to reach him, he was ‘busy enjoying the spectacle,’ according to a Washington Post account.

What Trump told supporters before they ransacked the Capitol in ‘totally appropriate’ speech

We’re going to have to fight much harder

‘Republicans are constantly fighting like a boxer with his hands tied behind his back. It’s like a boxer. And we want to be so nice. We want to be so respectful of everybody, including bad people. And we’re going to have to fight much harder.’

 

We’re going to walk down to the Capitol 

‘We’re going to walk down to the Capitol, and we’re going to cheer on our brave senators and congressmen and women, and we’re probably not going to be cheering so much for some of them, because you’ll never take back our country with weakness. You have to show strength, and you have to be strong.

 

‘Get tougher’ / You are allowed to go by very different rules  

‘The Republicans have to get tougher. You’re not going to have a Republican Party if you don’t get tougher. They want to play so straight. They want to play so serious. “The United States, the Constitution doesn’t allow me to send them back to the states.” Well, I would say yes, it does, because the Constitution says you have to protect our country, and you have to protect our Constitution, and you can’t vote on fraud, and fraud breaks up everything, doesn’t it? When you catch somebody in a fraud, you are allowed to go by very different rules. So I hope Mike has the courage to do what he has to do, and I hope he doesn’t listen to the RINOs and the stupid people that he’s listening toWhen you catch somebody in a fraud, you are allowed to go by very different rules. So I hope Mike has the courage to do what he has to do, and I hope he doesn’t listen to the RINOs and the stupid people that he’s listening to.’

 

Takes ‘more courage not to step up’ 

‘I also want to thank our 13 most courageous members of the U.S. Senate …  I actually think, though, it takes, again, more courage not to step up, and I think a lot of those people are going to find that out. And you better start looking at your leadership, because your leadership has led you down the tubes.’

 

Never concede 

‘We will never give up. We will never concede. It doesn’t happen. You don’t concede when there’s theft involved. Our country has had enough.’

 

On ‘fake news’ and ‘Big tech’

‘They rigged an election, they rigged it like they have never rigged an election before.’

‘All of us here today do not want to see our election victory stolen by bold and radical left Democrats, which is what they are doing, and stolen by the fake news media. That is what they have done and what they are doing. We will never give up. We will never concede. It doesn’t happen. You don’t concede when there’s theft involved.’

 

‘We will not take it anymore’

‘Our country has had enough. We will not take it anymore, and that is what this is all about.’ And to use a favorite term that all of you people really came up with, we will stop the steal.’

Denied Biden’s vote count

‘He had 80 million computer votes. It’s a disgrace. There’s never been anything like that. You can take Third World countries, just take a look, take Third World countries, their elections are more honest than what we have been going through in this country. It’s a disgrace. It’s a disgrace. Even when you look at last night, they were all running around like chickens with their heads cut off with boxes, and nobody knows what the hell is going on. There’s never been anything like this. We will not let them silence your voices. We’re not going to let it happen.’

[Note: Biden got more than 81 million votes; Trump rounded up his own total to 75 million.]

 

Call for military and law enforcement to join

‘And I would love to have, if those tens of thousands of people would be allowed, the military, the Secret Service and we want to thank you — and the police and law enforcement — great, you’re doing a great job. But I would love it if they could be allowed to come up with us. Is that possible? Can you just let them, please?’

 

Pressure on Mike Pence: Says it takes ‘courage’ to do nothing

‘I hope Mike is going to do the right thing. I hope so. I hope so because if Mike Pence does the right thing, we win the election … All Vice President Pence has to do is send it back to the states to re-certify, and we become president, and you are the happiest people.’

‘And I actually, I just spoke to Mike. I said, Mike, that doesn’t take courage, what takes courage is to do nothing. That takes courage, and then we are stuck with a president who lost the election by a lot, and we have to live with that for four more years. We’re just not going to let that happen.’

 

Won’t stand for Biden win

‘We want to go back, and we want to get this right, because we’re going to have somebody in there that should not be in there, and our country will be destroyed. And we’re not going to stand for that.’

 

‘You’re not the people that tore down our nation’

‘If this happened to the Democrats, there’d be hell all over the country going on. There’d be hell all over the country.

But just remember this, you’re stronger, you’re smarter. You’ve got more going than anybody, and

they try and demean everybody having to do with us, and you’re the real people. You’re the people that built this nation. You’re not the people that tore down our nation.’

 

March peacefully … we will see whether Republicans stand strong

‘I know that everyone here will soon be marching over to the Capitol building to peacefully and patriotically make your voices heard.

Today, we will see whether Republicans stand strong for the integrity of our elections. But whether or not they stand strong for our country — our country, our country has been under siege for a long time. Far longer than this four-year period’

 

‘Ashamed … throughout eternity’ 

‘Today, we see a very important event, though, because right over there, right there, we see the event that’s going to take place, and I’m going to be watching because history is going to be made. We’re going to see whether or not we have great and courageous leaders or whether or not we have leaders that should be ashamed of themselves throughout history, throughout eternity. They’ll be ashamed. And you know what? If they do the wrong thing, we should never, ever forget that they did. Never forget.’

 

Calls Republicans who voted not to count certified votes ‘warriors’

‘I want to thank the more than 140 members of the House. Those are warriors.15

They’re over there working like you’ve never seen before, studying, talking, actually going all the way back studying the roots of the Constitution because they know we have the right to send a bad vote that was illegally gotten.’

 

Biden will be ‘illegitimate’

‘But think of this: If you don’t do that, that means you will have a president of the United States for four years with his wonderful son, you will have a president who lost all of these states, or you will have a president, to put it another way, who was voted on by a bunch of stupid people who lost all of these states. You will have an illegitimate president. That is what you will have, and we can’t let that happen.’

 

Call to ‘do something’ about radical left

‘The radical left knows exactly what they were doing. They are ruthless, and it’s time that somebody did something about it.

And Mike Pence, I hope you’re going to stand up for the good of our Constitution and for the good of our country. (APPLAUSE) And if you’re not, I’m going to be very disappointed in you. I will tell you right now. I’m not hearing good stories.’

 

Election was ‘stolen’

‘Make no mistake, this election was stolen from you, from me, and from the country, and not a single swing state has conducted a comprehensive audit to remove the illegal ballots.

This should absolutely occur in every single contested state before the election is certified.’

 

Alleges ‘criminal enterprise’

‘So, when you hear — when you hear, “While there is no evidence to prove any wrongdoing,” this is the most fraudulent thing anybody’s — this is a criminal enterprise. This is a criminal enterprise.’

 

Fight like hell
 

‘And again, most people would stand there at 9 o’clock in the evening and say, “I want to thank you very much,” and they go off to some other life.

But I said something is wrong here, something is really wrong, can’t have happened, and we fight. We fight like hell, and if you don’t fight like hell you’re not going to have a country anymore.’

 

As the historic mob invasion of the U.S. seat of legislative government unfolded, a variety of people with influence over Trump sought to get to him to urge action.

The routes they took were typical of the loosely organized web of influence within the Trump White House. 

Trump ally Sen. Lindsey Graham – who only after the riot firmly declared Joe Biden the winner of the election – reached out to the president’s daughter, Ivanka Trump. 

‘It took him a while to appreciate the gravity of the situation,’ Graham told the Post. ‘The president saw these people as his allies in his journey and sympathetic to the idea that the election was stolen,’ Graham said of the rioters who took the Capitol. 

House Minority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy, who Trump believes is so much under his wing that he has publicly called him ‘My Kevin,’ was pleading for action. 

Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Pro-Trump supporters storm the U.S. Capitol following a rally with President Donald Trump on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC.

Protesters attempt to enter the U.S. Capitol Building on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Pro-Trump protesters entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation's capital during a joint session Congress to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. One Capitol Police officer died in the action

Protesters attempt to enter the U.S. Capitol Building on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. Pro-Trump protesters entered the U.S. Capitol building after mass demonstrations in the nation’s capital during a joint session Congress to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump. One Capitol Police officer died in the action

Police officers in riot gear line up as protesters gather on the U.S. Capitol Building on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. It took hours to regain control of the building

Police officers in riot gear line up as protesters gather on the U.S. Capitol Building on January 06, 2021 in Washington, DC. It took hours to regain control of the building

McCarthy phoned Trump directly to try to plead for assistance – but also called the president’s son in law, Jared Kushner, who was returning form a trip to the Middle East.

Former counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, who doesn’t even work for Trump anymore, tried to get through to him to urge action. 

She phoned an aide she knew was in close proximity to Trump. 

The office of the Mayor of Washington, desperate to get more National Guard forces amid logistical and jurisdictional hurdles, also reached out to Conway.

Chief of staff Mark Meadows urged Trump to speak out after an aide told him: ‘They are going to kill people,’ in reference to the rioters. 

A primary area of the pleas related to something Trump was capable of doing on his own without engaging with the bureaucracy: issuing simple Twitter or video pleas for protesters to get out of the Capitol.

The appeals he finally made either lacked a direct call to fall back, or sprinkled in approving language even as the riot that would become deadly unfolded.

At 2:30 pm, about half an hour after the Capitol breach, Trump told his supporters to ‘Please support our Capitol Police’ and to ‘Stay peaceful!’ 

His next message was more explicit, writing ‘No violence!’ – but claimed ‘WE are the Party of Law & Order.’

After he finally put out a video at about 4 pm, Trump finally told his backers to ‘go home.’ But he also called them ‘very special,’ called the election ‘fraudulent,’ and said: ‘You see the way others are treated that are so bad and so evil. I know how you feel. But go home, and go home in peace.’

Trump himself had egged on his supporters with demands that they ‘fight,’ calling the election fraudulent, and putting pressure on Vice President Mike Pence, whose only role was ceremonial and involved opening and reading from envelopes containing electoral votes.

Trump was glued to the television as the storming of the Capitol was broadcast. 

Prior reporting has revealed that the Washington D.C. government had requested a National Guard presence, but Guard were assigned to traffic and other assistance and weren’t issued ammo or riot gear. 

The now resigned chief of Capitol Police says he wanted more Guard support in advance of Wednesday but had been told by superiors to ask for it informally. The governor of Maryland, Larry Hogan, says there were delays getting approval to send Guard forces from the Pentagon.

But it wasn’t mere distraction that kept Trump from springing into action. It’s not atht he was too busy because he was so consumed, which he was,’ the New York Times reported.

‘He was pleased because it was people fighting on his behalf. He was pleased because he liked the scene. And he was pleased because it was delaying the certification of the Electoral College vote,’ the New York Times reported. ‘He knew what was happening… He just didn’t want to do anything.’

Although McCarthy told colleagues on a call Monday Trump had accepted ‘some responsibility’ for the riot, on Tuesday the president was back to his defiant posture familiar from impeachment and the Russia probe. 

Trump said a second impeachment Democrats are lining up is a ‘continuation of the greatest witch hunt in the history of politics.’

House Democrat accuses Republican lawmakers of leading MAGA rioters on Capitol ‘reconnaissance’ before riot as Stop the Steal organizer revealed to have boasted of help from three GOP congressmen

Rep. Mikie Sherrill said Tuesday she saw lawmakers giving tours she perceived to be 'a reconnaissance to groups Tuesday, January 5

Rep. Mikie Sherrill said Tuesday she saw lawmakers giving tours she perceived to be ‘a reconnaissance to groups Tuesday, January 5

A Democratic representative revealed Tuesday she witnessed members of Congress leading ‘reconnaissance’ tours through the Capitol the day before the mob stormed the building – as more details emerged over the attack indicating three Republican lawmakers may have helped protesters get inside.

Mikie Sherrill, who represents New Jersey’s 11th district, said during a Facebook Live video Tuesday night that she wants members of Congress who ‘abetted’ President Donald Trump and the violent crowd who descended on the Capitol to be held accountable and prevented from running for office in the future.

‘We can’t have a democracy if members of Congress are actively helping the president overturn the elections results,’ Sherrill said of her colleagues she claims assisted Trump in inciting a crowd to storm the Capitol last Wednesday, January 6.

‘Not only do I intend to see that the president is removed and never runs for office again and doesn’t have access to classified material,’ she continued in her straight-to-camera remarks. 

‘I also intend to see that those members of Congress who abetted him; those members of Congress who had groups coming through the Capitol that I saw on Jan. 5 – a reconnaissance for the next day; those members of Congress that incited this violent crowd; those members of Congress that attempted to help our president undermine our democracy – I’m going to see they are held accountable, and if necessary, ensure that they don’t serve in Congress.’

At the same time, new revelations are surfacing that a pro-Trump activist, Ali Alexander, claimed he was assisted by three GOP representatives to help organize the January 6 assault on the Capitol to disrupt the election certification.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said in an Instagram Live video Tuesday night that she feared for her life during the riots, specifically expressing her concerns that some GOP lawmakers would give away her location to the mob.

Sherrill's comments come as pro-Trump activist Ali Alexander revealed in a video on Periscope that three GOP lawmakers helped in organizing the disruption of Congress certifying the election for Joe Biden on January 6

Sherrill’s comments come as pro-Trump activist Ali Alexander revealed in a video on Periscope that three GOP lawmakers helped in organizing the disruption of Congress certifying the election for Joe Biden on January 6

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn walks past members of the National Guard Wednesday morning as they try to get some sleep inside the U.S. Capitol

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn walks past members of the National Guard Wednesday morning as they try to get some sleep inside the U.S. Capitol

‘I did not know if I was going to make it to the end of that day alive, and not just in a general sense but also in a very, very specific sense,’ the progressive lawmaker said during the hour-long live stream.

She called the close encounter ‘traumatizing’ and claimed her ‘near assassination’ is ‘not an exaggeration’.

‘There were QAnon and white supremacist sympathizers, and frankly white supremacist members of Congress, in that extraction point who I have felt would disclose my location and would create opportunities to allow me to be hurt, kidnapped, etc.,’ Ocasio-Cortez said.

She did not name any of the lawmakers she felt could have jeopardized her situation.

It is now known that Alexander told his followers on Periscope late last month that Republican Representatives Paul Gosar and Andy Biggs of Arizona and Representative Mo Brooks of Alabama were planning something big.

Alexander helped organize one of the demonstrations that converged on the Capitol lawn Wednesday – since then, his Facebook and Twitter accounts have been locked and he is banned from the social media platforms.

He said in a since-deleted video: ‘I want to let you guys know how we’re responding because I was the person who came up with the January 6 idea with Congressman Gosar, Congressman Mo Brooks and then Congressman Andy Biggs.’

All three lawmakers are hard-line Trump supporters.

‘We four schemed up of putting maximum pressure on Congress while they were voting so that who we couldn’t lobby, we could change the hearts and the minds of Republicans who were in that body hearing our loud roar from outside,’ Alexander detailed.

In the video to Periscope, he said the purpose of the rally was ‘to build momentum and pressure’ on the day Congress moved to certify the election for Joe Biden. He also vowed that his group ‘Stop the Steal’ would find rooms in the nation’s capital if hotels shut down in the midst of the unrest.

Alexander, pictured here with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones during a demonstration in Georgia in November, helped organize the 'Stop the Steal' protesters who gathered near the Capitol before the chaos broke out last Wednesday

Alexander, pictured here with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones during a demonstration in Georgia in November, helped organize the ‘Stop the Steal’ protesters who gathered near the Capitol before the chaos broke out last Wednesday

WHO IS ALI ALEXANDER?

Ali Abdul-Razaq Ali, 35, is a far-right activist who who goes by Ali Alexander. He identifies as black and Arab, according to Politico. 

He helped organize ‘Stop the Steal’ movement, which oppose Joe Biden’s election win and is pushing to prove that President Donald Trump won reelection on November 3.

Ali also takes responsibility for organizing the January 6 rally that convened outside the Capitol before it was stormed by thousands of pro-Trump protesters. He said in a live-streamed video that GOP Representatives Paul Gosar, Andy Biggs and Mo Brooks assisted with the effort to disrupt the join session of Congress moving to certify the Electoral College results for Biden.  

‘I want to let you guys know how we’re responding because I was the person who came up with the January 6 idea with Congressman Gosar, Congressman Mo Brooks and then Congressman Andy Biggs,’ Ali said in the now-deleted video.  

‘We four schemed up of putting maximum pressure on Congress while they were voting so that who we couldn’t lobby, we could change the hearts and the minds of Republicans who were in that body hearing our loud roar from outside,’ he continued.

Alexander, pictured here with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones during a demonstration in Georgia in November, helped organize the 'Stop the Steal' protesters who gathered near the Capitol before the chaos broke out last Wednesday

Alexander, pictured here with conspiracy theorist Alex Jones during a demonstration in Georgia in November, helped organize the ‘Stop the Steal’ protesters who gathered near the Capitol before the chaos broke out last Wednesday

Mugshot of Ali in January 2007 in a case where he pleaded guilty to  felony property theft

Ali also pleaded guilty a year later to a credit card abuse felony. This mugshot was taken August 2007

Ali Alexander pleaded guilty to two  separate felony charges in 2007 and 2008 in Forth Worth Texas

The activist runs with with Trump’s circle. In the summer of 2019 he gathered at the White House for the president’s ‘social media summit’ to bash platforms for their supposed anti-conservative and anti-Trump bias. 

This week, following reports of his involvement in the storming of the Capitol, Ali was banned from Facebook, Instagram and Twitter and his accounts were removed. 

Ali Abdul-Razaq Ali, 35, who goes by Ali Alexander, is a far-right activist from Fort Worth, Texas

Ali Abdul-Razaq Ali, 35, who goes by Ali Alexander, is a far-right activist from Fort Worth, Texas

Ali raised questions during the Democratic primary race over then-candidate Kamal Harris’s ‘black-ness’, sparking speculation he was waging a ‘birther’-like campaign against her. The now vice president-elect is half Indian and half Jamaican. 

‘Kamala Harris is implying she is descended from American Black Slaves,’ he wrote on Twitter in June 2019. ‘She’s not. She comes from Jamaican Slave Owners. That’s fine. She’s not an American Black. Period.’ Trump’s eldest son Donald Trump Jr. retweeted and then deleted the post, asking if it was true, and helping it go viral.  

Ali resides in Forth Worth, Texas. In 2007 he pleaded guilty to felony property theft in the Lone Star state and the next year also pleaded guilty to to a credit card abuse felony – also in Texas. 

Alexander did not specifically call for violence and instead claimed the left is ‘trying to push us to war.’

Biggs’ office sent out a statement claiming the congressman has not met or spoken with Alexander.

Biggs’ office responded to CNN, claiming he has not met or spoken with Alexander.

‘Congressman Biggs is not aware of hearing of or meeting Mr. Alexander at any point — let alone working with him to organize some part of a planned protest,’ the representative’s spokesperson said.

‘He did not have any contact with protestors or rioters, nor did he ever encourage or foster the rally or protests,’ they continued. ‘He was focused on his research and arguments to work within the confines of the law and established precedent to restore integrity to our elections, and to ensure that all Americans — regardless of party affiliation — can again have complete trust in our elections systems.’

Biggs, Gosar and Brooks all came under fire after going forward with objecting to the election results even after the violent Capitol riot forced them to evacuate the chamber and delayed proceedings for hours.

Sherrill, in her thirteen-and-a-half minute video posted to Facebook Tuesday, did not reveal which lawmakers she saw showing constituents around the Capitol last week – but she did make the shocking claim that the January 5 tours were part of some effort to get protesters familiar with the building before storming it the next day.

While some GOP lawmakers have come under fire for inciting the riots – whether directly or indirectly – or standing idly by as they unfolded, this is the most serious charge yet against sitting members of Congress regarding the unprecedented attack last week.

The six-hour riot resulted in hundreds of injuries and five deaths, including one Capitol Police officer and a female Trump supporter.

The House voted Tuesday evening on a non-binding resolution calling on Vice President Mike Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment to get Trump out of office now. The vote passed 223-205, with Sherrill voting in favor of it, even though Pence notified House Speaker Nancy Pelosi earlier Tuesday that he would not comply with the measure.

With the 25th Amendment off the table, and no hope of Trump resigning before his last seven days are up, House Democrats are likely to move forward Wednesday on impeaching the president for the second time.

Sherrill said in her video that she intends to support the effort.

She also voiced the sharp divide, which is widening in Congress, claiming those who do not agree with Democratic ideals of democracy are ‘now on different sides of this line.’