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Delhi Jammu and Kashmir The Buzz

Sale of poultry products banned in Delhi; bird flu cases reported in Uttar Pradesh


New Delhi, January 13

Fresh bird deaths and avian influenza cases were reported in Uttar Pradesh on Wednesday, while in neighbouring Delhi, civic bodies banned the sale of poultry products, even as the city government asked people not to panic and eat completely cooked eggs and chicken.

Unusual mortality among birds has also been reported in some districts of Jharkhand and Jammu and Kashmir, as per a statement of the Union fisheries, animal husbandry and dairying ministry, which has asked state governments not to ban supply of poultry products.

However, bird flu outbreak has been confirmed only in Delhi, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Kerala, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Himachal Pradesh, Haryana, Maharashtra and Gujarat till now, according to the ministry.

“Further, cases of unnatural mortality of birds have been reported in Ganderbal district of Jammu and Kashmir and four districts of Jharkhand,” it said.

On banning of poultry products, the ministry said it has been found that many states are banning supply of poultry and poultry products from other states. This will add to the negative impact on the poultry industry and hence, states are requested to reconsider such decision, it said.

In the national capital, the ban on sale, storage of poultry or processed chicken meat by shops and restaurants has been imposed by the North Delhi Municipal Corporation (NDMC), the East Delhi Municipal Corporation (EDMC) and the South Delhi Municipal Corporation (SDMC).

Earlier, the Delhi government had imposed a ban on sale of processed and packaged chicken brought from outside the city, after bird flu cases were confirmed in the national capital on Monday.

The civic bodies through their veterinary services departments have also said that said owners of restaurants and hotels will face action if egg-based dishes or poultry meat and other products are served to customers.

In the past one week, Delhi has reported several bird deaths, including those of ducks at the Sanjay Lake and crows at city parks. Reports of over 50 bird deaths were also received on a helpline of the Delhi government’s animal husbandry unit on Tuesday.

The Delhi Health Department in its advisory in view of bird flu cases, asked people not to panic and follow a set of dos and don’ts, including not consuming half-cooked chicken, half-boiled or half-fried eggs.

“H5N8 is highly pathogenic in birds but the pathogenicity in humans as well as the likelihood of human infection with avian influenza (AH5N8) virus is low,” the advisory issued by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) of Delhi stated.

It said avoid contact and prevent exposure from sick-looking sluggish chicken.

“Eat only completely cooked eggs and poultry products cooked at 70 degrees Celsius for 30 minutes. Do not consume half-cooked chicken or bird or half-boiled and half-fried eggs,” the advisory said.

Do not keep raw poultry meat near cooked meat. Wash hands frequently at the time of handling raw poultry products. Take due care of personal hygiene and maintain cleanliness in surrounding, it cautioned.

In Uttar Pradesh, bird deaths were reported from Jalaun district and avian flu cases from Kanpur.

Samples taken from two dead crows in Kanpur have tested positive for bird flu and with these, the number of confirmed cases of the influenza has increased to four in the city, forest officials said.

In Jalaun, five birds, mostly crows, were found dead and their samples have been sent for testing, while in Fatehpur district two peacock carcasses were found in a forest. However, officials ruled out bird flu as the cause of death of the peacocks.

Chief Veterinary Officer Dr Rajendra Kumar Sharma said as per the postmortem report, the birds died due to cold.

In the wake of the bird flu scare in Maharashtra, Thane Collector Rajesh Narvekar has instructed the forest department to pay special attention to wetland areas for migration of birds in the district.

Seven rapid response teams have been deployed in the district and a control room has been activated to monitor the bird flu situation, he said during a review meeting with senior officials. PTI





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Technology US

Hundreds of Twitter employees call for Trump to be banned

More than 300 Twitter employees have signed an internal petition calling for President Donald Trump to be permanently banned from the platform following a raid on the US Capitol on January 6th. Roughly an hour and a half after we published this story, Twitter apparently agreed — President Donald Trump has been permanently banned from Twitter.

The letter said that the employees are “disturbed” by the attack and that Twitter must “permanently suspend” Trump because of his involvement, according to a copy of the letter seen by The Verge. The Washington Post first reported on the letter’s circulation.

“We must examine Twitter’s complicity in what President-Elect Biden has rightly termed insurrection. Those acts jeopardize the wellbeing of the United States, our company, and our employees,” they wrote.

The letter writers also call for Twitter to “provide a clear account” of the company’s decision to temporarily suspend Trump’s account and to investigate “Twitter’s role in today’s insurrection.”

“We must learn from our mistakes in order to avoid causing future harm,” they wrote.

The letter has been signed by more than 300 people over the last two days, according to a person familiar with its circulation.

The pushback inside Twitter follows stronger action from Facebook, which suspended Trump indefinitely on Thursday. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and other platforms began removing posts or restricting his account on Wednesday after the president posted a video praising the mob that attacked the Capitol. The Alphabet Workers Union has also called on YouTube to ban Trump.

Twitter employees have been pushing back against leadership in company-wide Slack rooms as well. “I feel like we’ve bent over backwards to craft policies to allow Trump to stay up and to say what he has,” one employee wrote.

“This conversation has focused on how rigorously we have enforced our existing policies … Do we consider that there may be problems with our policies themselves?” wrote another.

On Thursday, Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey sent a message to staff saying that the company’s actions around Trump were important for establishing trust.

“It’s important we follow a clear and public rule set that can endure beyond any one moment,” Dorsey wrote. “Why? In order to earn trust. I know it may not feel that way right now.”

Dorsey also argued that it was up to elected leaders to repair the damage from Wednesday’s attack. “We aren’t the government,” he said. “Our elected officials must do the work to right this and bring the country together. Our role is around the integrity of the conversation of that work, and doing everything we can to promote healthy discourse, knowing it’s not always going to be accepted in the short term. But it will be over the long term. I’m certain of that.”

Dorsey said that Twitter had drawn “a very clear line in the sand” by saying it would permanently suspend Trump if he further violated the platform’s rules. “If that line is crossed, we will do what we said we are going to do,” he wrote.

During a company all-hands meeting on Friday, employees were told there would be a “retrospective” on the company’s recent policy decisions, according to screenshots of a Slack conversation seen by The Verge. Employees were also urged not to leak more information to the media.

In a statement emailed to The Verge, a Twitter spokesperson said: “Twitter encourages an open dialogue between our leadership and employees, and we welcome our employees to express their thoughts and concerns in whichever manner feels right to them.”

Update, 5:16PM ET: Article updated with a statement from Twitter.

Update, 6:42PM ET: Twitter has now banned Trump.

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Headlines UK London

Coronavirus UK: Travellers will finally be banned from entering UK without negative test

Britons may be stranded abroad as ministers say travellers will be banned from entering the UK without proof they are clear of coronavirus within days.

Passengers will be banned from entering the UK next week if they do not have a negative test within 72 hours of departure.

But there are concerns in the travel industry some will be stuck on holiday because many destinations – such as Barbados – do not have testing facilities.

It is expected to cause a scramble for return flights as around 100,000 Brits are currently away in hotspots such as Dubai and the Maldives.

Ministers agreed the strict measures last night amid growing pressure to tighten borders.

They will apply to Britons and foreign nationals in a bid to keep out infections and mutant strains such as the one in South Africa. The curbs could come in next week. 

Travellers will be banned from entering the UK next week if they do not have a negative test within 72 hours of departure. Pictured: Heathrow 

There are concerns in the travel industry some will be stuck on holiday because many destinations - such as Barbados - do not have facilities for carrying out tests. Pictured: A man being tested at Heathrow

There are concerns in the travel industry some will be stuck on holiday because many destinations – such as Barbados – do not have facilities for carrying out tests. Pictured: A man being tested at Heathrow

It is expected to cause a scramble for return flights as around 100,000 Brits are currently away in hotspots such as Dubai and the Maldives. Pictured: Heathrow last month

It is expected to cause a scramble for return flights as around 100,000 Brits are currently away in hotspots such as Dubai and the Maldives. Pictured: Heathrow last month

Every traveller coming into UK ports or airports should have a pre-flight negative test to enter or will face a £500 on-the-spot fine.

Airlines and other carriers should bar people from travelling without them but Border Force guards will carry out spot checks on arrivals.

It was unclear last night whether PCR tests will be demanded in all circumstances or if rapid ‘lateral flow’ tests, considered less accurate, might also be accepted. 

However, the travel industry raised fears some Britons could be stranded as countries such as Barbados do not have the resources.

One holidaymaker on the Caribbean island told the Times there was ‘zero chance’ they could be tested before their flight to the UK tomorrow.

Ministers agreed the strict measures last night amid growing pressure to tighten borders (file image)

Ministers agreed the strict measures last night amid growing pressure to tighten borders (file image)

The new rules mean travellers will have to quarantine for ten days – even if they test negative – if arriving from a ‘red list’ country with high rates of Covid-19. Pictured, passengers arriving in New York on a flight from London

The new rules mean travellers will have to quarantine for ten days – even if they test negative – if arriving from a ‘red list’ country with high rates of Covid-19. Pictured, passengers arriving in New York on a flight from London

The new rules mean travellers will have to quarantine for ten days – even if they test negative – if arriving from a ‘red list’ country with high rates of Covid-19.

But they will be able to leave isolation if a second test, which can be taken from the fifth day, is negative.

All travellers will require a ‘passenger locator form’ and face a £500 fine if they fail to comply.

Children under 11 will be exempt as will hauliers.

Hauliers crossing the Channel to France will also still need a negative test before departure following a decision by the French government on Thursday.

Some people will also dodge the new rules if they are coming from ‘countries without the infrastructure available to deliver the tests’.

Boris Johnson confirmed earlier this week a requirement for arrivals to have tested negative will be introduced, amid alarm at the spread of new variants around the world. Pictured, border control at Heathrow Airport

Boris Johnson confirmed earlier this week a requirement for arrivals to have tested negative will be introduced, amid alarm at the spread of new variants around the world. Pictured, border control at Heathrow Airport

Transport secretary Grant Shapps said: ‘With new strains of the virus developing internationally we must take further precautions.

‘Taken together with the existing mandatory self-isolation period for passengers returning from high-risk countries, pre-departure tests will provide a further line of defence.’

Britain’s airline industry said it recognised the need to act to introduce pre-departure testing but only as a short-term, emergency measure.

Chief Executive of Airlines UK Tim Alderslade said: ‘Once the roll-out of the vaccine accelerates, the focus must be on returning travel to normal as quickly as possible in order to support the UK’s economic recovery.’

But travel consultant Paul Charles raised concerns about how realistic it is to have a pre-arrival test policy.

Zahawi says Covid tests at airports ‘pointless’ in clashes with Piers Morgan on ITV

Nadhim Zahawi engaged in brutal clashes with Piers Morgan yesterday over the government’s Covid border controls.

The vaccines minister was slammed on ITV’s Good Morning Britain as he insisted it would be ‘pointless’ to test people at UK airports.

In a vicious rebuke, Morgan said: ‘We have, for inexplicable reasons, to anyone with a brain… throughout this pandemic resolutely refused to test people when they arrive at our border, nor have we required anybody to have a test to be negative when they get here.

‘Do you know how many people we have tested at our border?’

Mr Zahawi said: ‘The answer is you don’t take a test on the border because it’s pointless.’

Morgan added: ‘So the answer is zero… we don’t test people, any of our borders when they come in.

‘Secondly, we have never required anybody to have a test, and to test negative before they get on a plane to our country, unlike almost every other country in the world.’

Mr Zahawi said: ‘If you ask the scientists – Chris Whitty and Jonathan Van-Tam – that test at the border is near pointless because that person may be showing no symptoms, may test negative and two days later be positive.’

He pointed to reports there is ‘zero’ chance of getting a test in Barbados because all resources are focused on test and trace.

He tweeted: ‘How I wonder is the government’s plan for everyone departing from overseas to take a test ever going to work?’

He also questioned what will happen if test results come back slowly, and whether the infrastructure is in place to handle the paperwork.

The government was working with the devolved administrations of Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland to roll out similar measures.

The new rule would not apply to the Common Travel Area which includes England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland and Ireland as well as the Channel Islands and the Isle of Man.

It comes after ministers extended the travel ban on arrivals from South Africa to its neighbouring countries to keep out the new strain.

It affects Namibia, Zimbabwe, Botswana, Eswatini, Zambia, Malawi, Lesotho, Mozambique and Angola, plus the Seychelles and Mauritius.

The ban comes into effect from tomorrow at 4am.

The Department for Transport said the move was in response to data showing a steep rise in cases of the new variant in the region.

Last night Israel was also removed from the ‘safe’ list.

Lockdown restrictions which came into force on Wednesday mean holidays are banned.

All passengers arriving from countries not on the government’s travel corridor list will still be required to self-isolate for ten days, regardless of their Covid test result.

Scotland, which has devolved powers over transport policy, announced on Thursday travellers from Israel and Jerusalem, Botswana, Mauritius and the Seychelles were being removed from its travel corridor list and passengers arriving from those countries would still be required to self-isolate for 10 days.

Around 230 planes hit the tarmac at Britain’s six busiest airports on Wednesday, with 26 coming from the US which is being battered by the virus.

Thousands have arrived at Heathrow in the past few days, with full data not yet available but sources at the airport said the figure was be in the tens of thousands.

In November nearly 747,000 entered through the London hub airport.

Figures from Labour yesterday showed that just three in every 100 people arriving in the UK are being checked to see if they are complying with quarantine requirements.

Boris Johnson

Keir Starmer

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer took aim at the PM (both pictured above)  in the Commons today as politicians returned to vote on the new lockdown rules.

Mr Thomas-Symonds has written to Priti Patel to demand ‘an urgent review and improvement plan of quarantine arrangements’.

Mr Thomas-Symonds said analysis of Government data suggested just three per cent of arrivals expected to quarantine in England and Northern Ireland were successfully contacted by compliance checkers in the summer.

He said the Government’s Isolation Assurance Service, tasked with ensuring quarantine compliance, did not contact more than 1.9 million of the two million passengers spot checked by Border Force between June and September. 

In a letter to the Home Secretary, Mr Thomas-Symonds said the numbers were ‘deeply concerning’ and demonstrate that ‘efforts to track, trace and isolate cases coming into the UK have been completely undermined’.

He said: ‘The lack of a robust quarantine system as a result of shortcomings from the Government mean that it is virtually impossible to keep a grip on this spread or other variants that may come from overseas, leaving the UK defenceless, and completely exposed, with the nation’s doors unlocked to further COVID mutations.

The Labour frontbencher said there must be ‘an urgent review and improvement plan of quarantine arrangements’ rolled out as soon as possible.

The calls for action come amid growing concerns over a variant of the disease discovered in South Africa.

The Home Office has defended its ‘stringent measures’, and pointed to its move to stop direct flights from South Africa to the UK.

In the first lockdown, the Government argued against introducing border restrictions while the prevalence was so high in the UK, with experts arguing it would do little to bring down infection rates.

However, a quarantine period was introduced in June after the first peak and when cases were more under control.

Categories
Headline USA

Danna Paola is banned from Televisa along with two other singers | The State

Televisa did not think that three of the most recognized celebrities have joined the end of the year celebration that Tv Azteca carried out, since it is said that the executives of the San Ángel television station would have asked that they leave Danna Paola, Alejandra Guzman and Aracely Arambula of any program on the television.

Their participation in the competition was reason enough for the company to close the doors and provoke their discontent, so much so that they prohibited all the programs and their hosts from mentioning any of these artists.

This is how ‘Punto G’, a show column, put it: “With everything and that they have not done projects directly on Televisa for many years, Aracely Arámbula and Alejandra Guzmán unleashed the anger of several heads of San Ángel by appearing in the special of Fin of the Year on TV Azteca, so they sent to ask all commentators to refrain from mentioning them for a few months. You cannot say anything about them or about Danna Paola, who is very old, although she cares very little “.

However, this should not be a concern for any of the three, since each of them maintains important projects on their own and they enjoy great popularity and affection on the part of their fans, who will surely continue to support them in every step they take. during this year.

Keep reading: Alejandra Guzmán unleashes a scandal for her appearance on a television program

Danna Paola leaves her fans wanting because of her nude color outfit

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Categories
Headlines UK

Holidays BANNED and travellers arriving in the UK are ‘set to be asked for a negative Covid test’

Holidays have been banned under the new lockdown rules that forbids international travel unless for ‘essential reasons’.

Travelers face a £200 fine for breaking the rules and the government advice explicitly states ‘you should not travel abroad unless it is permitted. This means you must not go on holiday’.

You can only travel internationally – or within the UK – where you first have a legally permitted reason to leave home. In addition, you should consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting.

You should not travel abroad unless it is permitted. This means you must not go on holiday. 

And a report has suggested that travellers arriving in the UK could have to present a negative Covid test before they are allowed to enter the country.

According to the Times, ministers are set to introduce measures requiring the tests be taken no more than 72 hours prior to arrival as part of new measures to combat a new strain of the coronavirus.

Only hauliers will be exempt from the latest condition of entry to the UK, if it is introduced.

Currently, travellers arriving into the UK must complete a locator form with their contact details and may have to self-isolate if they have arrived from a country which is not included on the travel corridor list.

It comes as Matt Hancock yesterday revealed he was ‘incredibly worried’ about the highly-infectious South African coronavirus mutation which top experts fear could scupper Britain’s vaccine roll-out.

Scroll down for the full government lockdown guidelines 

The Government has banned holidays as part of the latest coronavirus restrictions which will also see international arrivals asked to present a negative Covid-19 test to enter the country

The Health Secretary warned the variant — which has already been spotted in the UK — posed a ‘very, very significant problem’.

Under the latest national lockdown rules, which is now in effect, holidays are banned as international travel is only permitted for a strict number of reasons such as for work.

UK residents currently abroad do not need to return home immediately. However, you should check with your airline or travel operator on arrangements for returning.

Within the UK, domestic holidays are also banned as you must stay at home at all times except for a limited number of ‘reasonable excuses’ such as shopping for essentials or work.

The Government has said if you need to travel you should stay local – meaning avoiding travelling outside of your village, town or the part of a city where you live – and look to reduce the number of journeys you make overall. 

Two days before Christmas, Britain banned all arrivals from South Africa, as well as travel to the nation, after discovering two cases of the mutant Covid-19 strain which is driving a massive second wave among young people in the country.

However, it is understood those arriving indirectly from the country did not have to prove they had tested negative before entering the UK.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses the public to announce the latest national lockdown in a bid to combat a new strain of coronavirus which is reportedly 70 per cent more infectious

Prime Minister Boris Johnson addresses the public to announce the latest national lockdown in a bid to combat a new strain of coronavirus which is reportedly 70 per cent more infectious

Neil O’Brien, Conservative MP for Harborough, tweeted measures needed to ‘toughen up’ at the border after one user drew comparisons to stricter rules in South Korea.

Senior aviation sources told the Times the Government was due to revisit the rules surrounding international arrival and that the new strain had prompted ‘a hastening in the introduction of measures’ that have yet to be officially announced. 

In a televised address to the nation yesterday evening, Boris Johnson announced the new national lockdown to curb the spread of a mutated strain of the virus which is up to 70% more transmissible, and further studies are ongoing.

The UK’s chief medical officers warned of a ‘material risk of the being overwhelmed’ in the next 21 days as the Covid alert level raised to five for the first time since the pandemic began, meaning the NHS could be face breaking point in a matter of days.

The restrictions are unlikely to be eased until around 13 million people aged over 70 or classed as clinically extremely vulnerable have received the vaccine and been given enough time to be protected – a period of about two to three weeks after getting the jab. 

The public were told to work from home unless it is impossible to do so, such as for critical workers and those in the construction industry.

Exercise is permitted with household or support bubble members or with one other person from another household, but is advised to be limited to only once per day and carried out locally. 

Non-essential shops have to close, but early years settings such as nurseries and childminders are allowed to remain open and existing childcare bubbles can stay in place. 

Restaurants and other hospitality venues can continue delivery or takeaway services but are no longer permitted to serve alcohol.

Outdoor gyms, tennis courts and golf courses must close and outdoor team sports will be prohibited. 

The clinically vulnerable who were previously told to shield should stay at home and only leave for medical appointments and exercise.

The regulations are expected to be laid before Parliament today, with MPs retrospectively being given a vote after they are recalled early from the Christmas break on Wednesday. 

A government spokesman declined to comment on the latest travel restrictions. 

How Covid has crushed 2020 travel plans – leaving many holiday companies facing a bleak winter… 

By Jo Tweedy

The travel industry has faced plenty of adversity before 2020, with terrorism, economic downturns and the previous threat of pandemics – including the 2003 SARS outbreak – all impacting travel agents and tour operators in the past.

However, most would agree that the 2020 coronavirus pandemic is the biggest single blow ever dealt to the industry… with quarantine, a fear of the virus spreading on planes and in airports, and the promise of a second wave this winter already proving the death knell for some smaller operators. 

In the UK, while the summer saw a chance for the staycation market to bounce back from the wiped-out Easter and May holidays, Boris Johnson’s rule of six – and the likelihood of even tougher restrictions coming soon – has ensured that many British hotels and self-catering properties are preparing for huge losses over the winter. 

The travel industry faces its toughest ever winter, with the threat of a second wave likely to further deter people from booking holidays

The travel industry faces its toughest ever winter, with the threat of a second wave likely to further deter people from booking holidays 

For companies who rely on overseas operations, including airlines, the picture looks even bleaker, with countries on the ‘travel corridor’ list changing frequently, meaning there’s little certainty for holidaymakers who might ordinarily break for the sun.  

This week, the general secretary of the TSSA trade union, Manuel Cortes, made an impassioned plea for the Government to do more to save the beleaguered holiday industry, with an upturn in fortunes now looking increasingly unlikely until at least Spring 2021. 

He told this year’s Institute of Travel and Tourism virtual conference: ‘I am saying that no stone should be left unturned to support our industry. At the moment we are seeing nothing really [from government].

‘Whenever this virus is conquered we will all need a well-deserved holiday and sadly if the government doesn’t take measures to preserve our industry we will not have an industry.

‘In the short term, the industry cannot compete. What we need is the government to step in and hold the industry’s hand so we can emerge stronger than before.

‘It has done so in the past for the banking sector, why can’t it do the same for the travel trade?’

What you can and cannot do during the national lockdown: The government guidelines in full

You must stay at home. The single most important action we can all take is to stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives.

You should follow this guidance immediately. The law will be updated to reflect these new rules.

Leaving home

You must not leave, or be outside of your home except where necessary. You may leave the home to:

  • shop for basic necessities, for you or a vulnerable person
  • go to work, or provide voluntary or charitable services, if you cannot reasonably do so from home
  • exercise with your household (or support bubble) or one other person, this should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.
  • meet your support bubble or childcare bubble where necessary, but only if you are legally permitted to form one
  • seek medical assistance or avoid injury, illness or risk of harm (including domestic abuse)
  • attend education or childcare – for those eligible

Colleges, primary and secondary schools will remain open only for vulnerable children and the children of critical workers. All other children will learn remotely until February half term. Early Years settings remain open.

Higher Education provision will remain online until mid February for all except future critical worker courses.

If you do leave home for a permitted reason, you should always stay local in the village, town, or part of the city where you live. You may leave your local area for a legally permitted reason, such as for work.

If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential. You should not attend work

Meeting others

You cannot leave your home to meet socially with anyone you do not live with or are not in a support bubble with (if you are legally permitted to form one).

You may exercise on your own, with one other person, or with your household or support bubble.

You should not meet other people you do not live with, or have formed a support bubble with, unless for a permitted reason.

Stay 2 metres apart from anyone not in your household.

Detailed guidance on the national lockdown

Who this guidance is for

This guidance is for people who are fit and well. There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable to coronavirus and households with a possible or confirmed coronavirus infection. If you are clinically extremely vulnerable you should not attend work, school, college or university, and limit the time you spend outside the home. You should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential.

Hands. Face. Space.

Approximately 1 in 3 people who have coronavirus have no symptoms and could be spreading it without realising it.

Remember – ‘Hands. Face. Space.’

  • hands – wash your hands regularly and for at least 20 seconds
  • face – wear a face covering in indoor settings where social distancing may be difficult, and where you will come into contact with people you do not normally meet
  • space – stay 2 metres apart from people you do not live with where possible, or 1 metre with extra precautions in place (such as wearing face coverings)

In all circumstances, you should follow the guidance on meeting others safely.

When you can leave home

You must not leave or be outside of your home except where you have a ‘reasonable excuse’. This will be put in law. The police can take action against you if you leave home without a ‘reasonable excuse’, and issue you with a fine (Fixed Penalty Notice).

You can be given a Fixed Penalty Notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400.

A ‘reasonable excuse’ includes:

  • Work – you can only leave home for work purposes where it is unreasonable for you to do your job from home, including but not limited to people who work within critical national infrastructure, construction or manufacturing that require in-person attendance
  • Volunteering – you can also leave home to provide voluntary or charitable services.
  • Essential activities – you can leave home to buy things at shops or obtain services. You may also leave your home to do these things on behalf of a disabled or vulnerable person or someone self-isolating.
  • Education and childcare – You can only leave home for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children where they are eligible to attend. Access to education and children’s activities for school-aged pupils is restricted. See further information on education and childcare. People can continue existing arrangements for contact between parents and children where they live apart. This includes childcare bubbles.
  • Meeting others and care – You can leave home to visit people in your support bubble ( if you are legally permitted to form one), to provide informal childcare for children under 14 as part of a childcare bubble (for example, to enable parents to work, and not to enable social contact between adults), to provide care for disabled or vulnerable people, to provide emergency assistance, to attend a support group (of up to 15 people), or for respite care where that care is being provided to a vulnerable person or a person with a disability, or is a short break in respect of a looked-after child.
  • Exercise – You can continue to exercise alone, with one other person or with your household or support bubble. This should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.You should maintain social distancing. See exercising and meeting other people.
  • Medical reasons – You can leave home for a medical reason, including to get a COVID-19 test, for medical appointments and emergencies.
  • Harm and compassionate visits – you can leave home to be with someone who is giving birth, to avoid injury or illness or to escape risk of harm (such as domestic abuse). You can also leave home to visit someone who is dying or someone in a care home (if permitted under care home guidance), hospice, or hospital, or to accompany them to a medical appointment.
  • Animal welfare reasons – you can leave home for animal welfare reasons, such as to attend veterinary services for advice or treatment.
  • Communal worship and life events – You can leave home to attend or visit a place of worship for communal worship, a funeral or event related to a death, a burial ground or a remembrance garden, or to attend a wedding ceremony. You should follow the guidance on the safe use of places of worship and must not mingle with anyone outside of your household or support bubble when attending a place of worship.Weddings, funerals and religious, belief-based or commemorative events linked to someone’s death are all subject to limits on the numbers that can attend, and weddings and civil ceremonies may only take place in exceptional circumstances.

There are further reasonable excuses. For example, you may leave home to fulfil legal obligations or to carry out activities related to buying, selling, letting or renting a residential property, or where it is reasonably necessary for voting in an election or referendum.

Exercising and meeting other people

You should minimise time spent outside your home.

It is against the law to meet socially with family or friends unless they are part of your household or support bubble. You can only leave your home to exercise, and not for the purpose of recreation or leisure (e.g. a picnic or a social meeting). This should be limited to once per day, and you should not travel outside your local area.

You can exercise in a public outdoor place:

  • by yourself
  • with the people you live with
  • with your support bubble (if you are legally permitted to form one)
  • in a childcare bubble where providing childcare
  • or, when on your own, with 1 person from another household
  • Public outdoor places include:
  • parks, beaches, countryside accessible to the public, forests
  • public gardens (whether or not you pay to enter them)
  • the grounds of a heritage site
  • playgrounds

Outdoor sports venues, including tennis courts, golf courses and swimming pools, must close.

When around other people, stay 2 metres apart from anyone not in your household – meaning the people you live with – or your support bubble. Where this is not possible, stay 1 metre apart with extra precautions (e.g. wearing a face covering).

You must wear a face covering in many indoor settings, such as shops or places of worship where these remain open, and on public transport, unless you are exempt. This is the law. Read guidance on face coverings.

Support and childcare bubbles

You have to meet certain eligibility rules to form a support or childcare bubble. This means not everyone will be able to form a bubble.

A support bubble is a support network which links two households. You can form a support bubble with another household of any size only if you meet the eligibility rules.

It is against the law to form a support bubble if you do not follow these rules.

You are permitted to leave your home to visit your support bubble (and to stay overnight with them). However, if you form a support bubble, it is best if this is with a household who live locally. This will help prevent the virus spreading from an area where more people are infected.

If you live in a household with anyone aged under 14, you can form a childcare bubble. This allows friends or family from one other household to provide informal childcare.

You must not meet socially with your childcare bubble, and must avoid seeing members of your childcare and support bubbles at the same time.

There is separate guidance for support bubbles and childcare bubbles.

Where and when you can meet in larger groups

There are still circumstances in which you are allowed to meet others from outside your household, childcare or support bubble in larger groups, but this should not be for socialising and only for permitted purposes. A full list of these circumstances will be included in the regulations, and includes:

  • for work, or providing voluntary or charitable services, where it is unreasonable to do so from home. This can include work in other people’s homes where necessary – for example, for nannies, cleaners, social care workers providing support to children and families, or tradespeople. See guidance on working safely in other people’s homes). Where a work meeting does not need to take place in a private home or garden, it should not – for example, although you can meet a personal trainer, you should do so in a public outdoor place.
  • in a childcare bubble (for the purposes of childcare only)
  • Where eligible to use these services, for education, registered childcare, and supervised activities for children. Access to education and childcare facilities is restricted. See further information on education and childcare.
  • for arrangements where children do not live in the same household as both their parents or guardians
  • to allow contact between birth parents and children in care, as well as between siblings in care
  • for prospective adopting parents to meet a child or children who may be placed with them
  • to place or facilitate the placing of a child or children in the care of another by social services
  • for birth partners
  • to provide emergency assistance, and to avoid injury or illness, or to escape a risk of harm (including domestic abuse)
  • to see someone who is dying
  • to fulfil a legal obligation, such as attending court or jury service
  • for gatherings within criminal justice accommodation or immigration detention centres
  • to provide care or assistance to someone vulnerable, or to provide respite for a carer
  • for a wedding or equivalent ceremony in exceptional circumstances and only for up to 6 people
  • for funerals – up to a maximum of 30 people. Wakes and other linked ceremonial events can continue in a group of up to 6 people.
  • to visit someone at home who is dying, or to visit someone receiving treatment in a hospital, hospice or care home, or to accompany a family member or friend to a medical appointment
  • for elite sportspeople (and their coaches if necessary, or parents/guardians if they are under 18) – or those on an official elite sports pathway – to compete and train
  • to facilitate a house move

Support groups that have to be delivered in person can continue with up to 15 participants where formally organised to provide mutual aid, therapy or any other form of support – but they must take place at a premises other than a private home.

Where a group includes someone covered by an exception (for example, someone who is working or volunteering), they are not generally counted as part of the gatherings limit. This means, for example, a tradesperson can go into a household without breaching the limit, if they are there for work, and the officiant at a wedding would not count towards the limit.

If you break the rules

The police can take action against you if you meet in larger groups. This includes breaking up illegal gatherings and issuing fines (fixed penalty notices).

You can be given a Fixed Penalty Notice of £200 for the first offence, doubling for further offences up to a maximum of £6,400. If you hold, or are involved in holding, an illegal gathering of over 30 people, the police can issue fines of £10,000.

Protecting people more at risk from coronavirus

If you are clinically vulnerable, you could be at higher risk of severe illness from coronavirus. There is additional advice for people who are clinically extremely vulnerable to coronavirus. Those who are clinically extremely vulnerable should not attend work, school, college or university, and limit the time you spend outside the home. You should only go out for medical appointments, exercise or if it is essential.

Travel

You must not leave your home unless you have a reasonable excuse (for example, for work or education purposes). If you need to travel you should stay local – meaning avoiding travelling outside of your village, town or the part of a city where you live – and look to reduce the number of journeys you make overall. The list of reasons you can leave your home and area include, but are not limited to:

  • work, where you cannot reasonably work from home
  • accessing education and for caring responsibilities
  • visiting those in your support bubble – or your childcare bubble for childcare
  • visiting hospital, GP and other medical appointments or visits where you have had an accident or are concerned about your health
  • buying goods or services that you need, but this should be within your local area wherever possible
  • outdoor exercise. This should be done locally wherever possible, but you can travel a short distance within your area to do so if necessary (for example, to access an open space)
  • attending the care and exercise of an animal, or veterinary services

If you need to travel, walk or cycle where possible, and plan ahead and avoid busy times and routes on public transport. This will allow you to practice social distancing while you travel.

Avoid car sharing with anyone from outside your household or your support bubble. See the guidance on car sharing.

If you need to use public transport, you should follow the safer travel guidance.

International travel

You can only travel internationally – or within the UK – where you first have a legally permitted reason to leave home. In addition, you should consider the public health advice in the country you are visiting.

If you do need to travel overseas (and are legally permitted to do so, for example, because it is for work), even if you are returning to a place you’ve visited before, you should look at the rules in place at your destination and the Foreign, Commonwealth and Development Office (FCDO) travel advice.

UK residents currently abroad do not need to return home immediately. However, you should check with your airline or travel operator on arrangements for returning.

Foreign nationals are subject to the ‘Stay at Home’ regulations. You should not travel abroad unless it is permitted. This means you must not go on holiday.

If you are visiting the UK, you may return home. You should check whether there are any restrictions in place at your destination.

Staying away from home overnight

You cannot leave your home or the place where you are living for holidays or overnight stays unless you have a reasonable excuse for doing so. This means that holidays in the UK and abroad are not allowed.

This includes staying in a second home or caravan, if that is not your primary residence. This also includes staying with anyone who you don’t live with unless they’re in your support bubble.

You are allowed to stay overnight away from your home if you:

  • are visiting your support bubble
  • are unable to return to your main residence
  • need accommodation while moving house
  • need accommodation to attend a funeral or related commemorative event
  • require accommodation for work purposes or to provide voluntary services
  • are a child requiring accommodation for school or care
  • are homeless, seeking asylum, a vulnerable person seeking refuge, or if escaping harm (including domestic abuse)
  • are an elite athlete or their support staff or parent, if the athlete is under 18 and it is necessary to be outside of the home for training or competition

If you are already on holiday, you should return to your home as soon as practical.

Guest accommodation providers such as hotels, B&Bs and caravan parks may remain open for the specific reasons set out in law, including where guests are unable to return to their main residence, use that guest accommodation as their main residence, need accommodation while moving house, are self-isolating as required by law, or would otherwise be made homeless as a result of the accommodation closing. A full list of reasons can be found in the guidance on closing certain businesses and venues in England.

Accommodation providers are also encouraged to work cooperatively with local authorities to provide accommodation to vulnerable groups, including the homeless.

Going to work

You may only leave your home for work if you cannot reasonably work from home.

Where people cannot work from home – including, but not limited to, people who work in critical national infrastructure, construction, or manufacturing – they should continue to travel to their workplace. This is essential to keeping the country operating and supporting sectors and employers.

Public sector employees working in essential services, including childcare or education, should continue to go into work.

Where it is necessary for you to work in other people’s homes – for example, for nannies, cleaners or tradespeople – you can do so. Otherwise, you should avoid meeting for work in a private home or garden, where COVID-19 Secure measures may not be in place.

Employers and employees should discuss their working arrangements, and employers should take every possible step to facilitate their employees working from home, including providing suitable IT and equipment to enable remote working.

The risk of transmission can be substantially reduced if COVID-19 secure guidelines are followed closely. Extra consideration should be given to those people at higher risk.

Going to school, college and university

Colleges, primary (reception onwards) and secondary schools will remain open for vulnerable children and the children of critical workers. All other children will learn remotely until February half term.

In the circumstances, we do not think it is possible for all exams in the summer to go ahead as planned. We will accordingly be working with Ofqual to consult rapidly to put in place alternative arrangements that will allow students to progress fairly.

Public exams and vocational assessments scheduled to take place in January will go ahead as planned.

Universities

Those students who are undertaking training and study for the following courses should return to face to face learning as planned and be tested twice, upon arrival or self-isolate for ten days:

  • Medicine & dentistry
  • Subjects allied to medicine/health
  • Veterinary science
  • Education (initial teacher training)
  • Social work
  • Courses which require Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Body (PSRB) assessments and or mandatory activity which is scheduled for January and which cannot be rescheduled (your university will notify you if this applies to you).

Students who do not study these courses should remain where they are wherever possible, and start their term online, as facilitated by their university until at least Mid-February. This includes students on other practical courses not on the list above.

We have previously published guidance to universities and students on how students can return safely to higher education in the spring term. This guidance sets out how we will support higher education providers to enable students that need to return to do so as safely as possible following the winter break.

If you live at university, you should not move back and forward between your permanent home and student home during term time.

For those students who are eligible for face to face teaching, you can meet in groups of more than your household as part of your formal education or training, where necessary. Students should expect to follow the guidance and restrictions. You should socially distance from anyone you do not live with wherever possible.

Childcare

There are several ways that parents and carers can continue to access childcare:

  • Early Years settings (including nurseries and childminders) remain open
  • Vulnerable children and children of critical workers can continue to use registered childcare, childminders and other childcare activities (including wraparound care)
  • parents are able to form a childcare bubble with one other household for the purposes of informal childcare, where the child is under 14. This is mainly to enable parents to work, and must not be used to enable social contact between adults
  • some households will also be able to benefit from being in a support bubble
  • nannies will be able to continue to provide services, including in the home

Care home visits

Visits to care homes can take place with arrangements such as substantial screens, visiting pods, or behind windows. Close-contact indoor visits are not allowed. No visits will be permitted in the event of an outbreak.

You should check the guidance on visiting care homes during COVID-19 to find out how visits should be conducted. Residents cannot meet people indoors on a visit out (for example, to visit their relatives in the family home). There is separate guidance for those in supported living.

Weddings, civil partnerships, religious services and funerals

Weddings, civil partnership ceremonies and funerals are allowed with strict limits on attendance, and must only take place in COVID-19 secure venues or in public outdoor spaces unless in exceptional circumstances.

Funerals can be attended by a maximum of 30 people. Linked religious, belief-based or commemorative events, such as stone settings and ash scatterings can also continue with up to 6 people in attendance. Anyone working is not counted in these limits. Social distancing should be maintained between people who do not live together or share a support bubble.

Weddings and civil partnership ceremonies must only take place with up to 6 people. Anyone working is not included. These should only take place in exceptional circumstances, for example, an urgent marriage where one of those getting married is seriously ill and not expected to recover, or is to undergo debilitating treatment or life-changing surgery.

Places of worship

You can attend places of worship for a service. However, you must not mingle with anyone outside of your household or support bubble. You should maintain strict social distancing at all times.

You should follow the national guidance on the safe use of places of worship.

Sports and physical activity

Indoor gyms and sports facilities will remain closed. Outdoor sports courts, outdoor gyms, golf courses, outdoor swimming pools, archery/driving/shooting ranges and riding arenas must also close. Organised outdoor sport for disabled people is allowed to continue.

Moving home

You can still move home. People outside your household or support bubble should not help with moving house unless absolutely necessary.

Estate and letting agents and removals firms can continue to work. If you are looking to move, you can go to property viewings.

Follow the national guidance on moving home safely, which includes advice on social distancing, letting fresh air in, and wearing a face covering.

Financial support

Wherever you live, you may be able to get financial help  

Businesses and venues

Businesses and venues which must close

To reduce social contact, the regulations require some businesses to close and impose restrictions on how some businesses provide goods and services. The full list of businesses required to close can be found in the guidance on closing certain businesses and venues in England, but includes:

  • non-essential retail, such as clothing and homeware stores, vehicle showrooms (other than for rental), betting shops, tailors, tobacco and vape shops, electronic goods and mobile phone shops, auction houses (except for auctions of livestock or agricultural equipment) and market stalls selling non-essential goods. These venues can continue to be able to operate click-and-collect (where goods are pre-ordered and collected off the premises) and delivery services.
  • hospitality venues such as cafes, restaurants, pubs, bars and social clubs; with the exception of providing food and non-alcoholic drinks for takeaway (until 11pm), click-and-collect and drive-through. All food and drink (including alcohol) can continue to be provided by delivery.
  • accommodation such as hotels, hostels, guest houses and campsites, except for specific circumstances, such as where these act as someone’s main residence, where the person cannot return home, for providing accommodation or support to the homeless, or where it is essential to stay there for work purposes
  • leisure and sports facilities such as leisure centres and gyms, swimming pools, sports courts,fitness and dance studios, riding arenas at riding centres, climbing walls, and golf courses.
  • entertainment venues such as theatres, concert halls, cinemas, museums and galleries, casinos, amusement arcades, bingo halls, bowling alleys, skating rinks, go-karting venues, indoor play and soft play centres and areas (including inflatable parks and trampolining centres), circuses, fairgrounds, funfairs, water parks and theme parks
  • animal attractions (such as zoos, safari parks, aquariums, and wildlife reserves)
  • indoor attractions at venues such as botanical gardens, heritage homes and landmarks must also close, though outdoor grounds of these premises can stay open for outdoor exercise.
  • personal care facilities such as hair, beauty, tanning and nail salons. Tattoo parlours, spas, massage parlours, body and skin piercing services must also close. These services should not be provided in other people’s homes
  • community centres and halls must close except for a limited number of exempt activities, as set out below. Libraries can also remain open to provide access to IT and digital services – for example for people who do not have it at home – and for click-and-collect services

Some of these businesses and places will also be permitted to be open for a small number of exempt activities. A full list of exemptions can be found in the guidance on closing certain businesses and venues in England, but includes:

  • education and training – for schools to use sports, leisure and community facilities where that is part of their normal provision
  • childcare purposes and supervised activities for those children eligible to attend
  • hosting blood donation sessions and food banks
  • to provide medical treatment
  • for elite sports persons to train and compete (in indoor and outdoor sports facilities), and professional dancers and choreographers to work (in fitness and dance studios)
  • for training and rehearsal without an audience (in theatres and concert halls)
  • for the purposes of film and TV filming

Businesses and venues which can remain open

Other businesses and venues are permitted to stay open, following COVID-19 secure guidelines. Businesses providing essential goods and services can stay open. The full list of these businesses can be found in the guidance on closing certain businesses and venues in England, but includes:

  • essential retail such as food shops, supermarkets, pharmacies, garden centres, building merchants and suppliers of building products and off-licences
  • market stalls selling essential retail may also stay open
  • businesses providing repair services may also stay open, where they primarily offer repair services
  • petrol stations, automatic (but not manual) car washes, vehicle repair and MOT services, bicycle shops, and taxi and vehicle hire businesses
  • banks, building societies, post offices, short-term loan providers and money transfer businesses
  • funeral directors
  • laundrettes and dry cleaners
  • medical and dental services
  • vets and retailers of products and food for the upkeep and welfare of animals
  • animal rescue centres, boarding facilities and animal groomers (may continue to be used for animal welfare, rather than aesthetic purposes)
  • agricultural supplies shops
  • mobility and disability support shops
  • storage and distribution facilities
  • car parks, public toilets and motorway service areas
  • outdoor playgrounds
  • outdoor parts of botanical gardens and heritage sites for exercise
  • places of worship
  • crematoriums and burial grounds

Public services

The majority of public services will continue and you will be able to leave home to visit them. These include:

  • the NHS and medical services like GPs and dentists. We are supporting the NHS to carry out urgent and non-urgent services safely, and it is vital anyone who thinks they need any kind of medical care comes forward and seeks help
  • Jobcentre Plus sites
  • courts and probation services
  • civil registrations offices
  • passport and visa services
  • services provided to victims
  • waste or recycling centres
  • getting an MOT, if you need to drive when lawfully leaving home
Categories
Sports UK

Edinson Cavani banned for three games by FA for offensive Instagram post

Manchester United striker Edinson Cavani has been banned for three matches and has received a fine of £100,000 by the FA.

The punishment relates to a social media post sent by Cavani containing a Spanish phrase considered offensive in some contexts.

And the Uruguayan forward will also be required to undergo face-to-face education after admitting a charge for a breach of FA Rule E3.

A statement from United supported their player, and read: “Edinson wasn’t aware that his words could have been misconstrued and he sincerely apologised for the post and to anyone who was offended.

“Despite his honest belief that he was simply sending an affectionate thank you in response to a congratulatory message from a close friend, he chose not to contest the charge out of respect for, and solidarity with, The FA and the fight against racism in football.

Edinson Cavani has been banned for three games

“While it is clear context + intent key factors, note that the independent Regulatory Commission required to impose a min 3 game suspension.

“The Club trusts Commission will make it clear in written reasons that Edinson Cavani not a racist, nor any racist intent in relation to post.”

Cavani sent a message after scoring for United in their 3-2 win over Southampton in November.

He subsequently deleted the post and apologised when it was pointed out that his words could have caused offence.

Cavani posted after scoring against Southampton

As a result of the suspension Cavani will miss United’s Premier League game against Aston Villa on Friday, as well as the upcoming Carabao Cup semi-final against Manchester City and FA Cup third Round tie against Watford.

Cavani has impressed since joining the Red Devils on a free transfer in the summer, scoring three goals and creating two assists in his nine Premier League appearances so far.

Categories
Headlines UK

‘Buy one, get one free’ deals on fizzy drinks, crisps and fatty foods will be banned from April 2022

‘Buy one, get one free’ deals on fizzy drinks, crisps and fatty foods will be banned in medium and large stores, as well as on websites, from April 2022

  • The curbs will apply to promotions for food and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar
  • That includes sweets, chocolate, biscuits, ice cream, pastries and yoghurts
  • Free refills of sugary soft drinks prohibited in restaurants and fast food outlets

Supermarket promotions of unhealthy food will be curbed as part of the Government’s war on obesity.

‘Buy one get one free’ deals on fizzy drinks, crisps and fatty foods will be banned in medium and large stores, as well as on websites, from April 2022. 

And free refills of sugary soft drinks will be prohibited in restaurants and fast food outlets. 

Supermarket promotions of unhealthy food will be curbed as part of the Government’s war on obesity. The curbs will apply to promotions for food high in fat, salt or sugar (file image)

The curbs – designed to combat ‘pester power’, where children pressure their parents into making purchases – will apply to promotions for food and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar. 

That includes sweets, chocolate, biscuits, fizzy drinks, ice cream, pastries, yoghurts, and sugary milkshakes.

Also within the remit of the new rules are pizzas, ready meals, battered products, crisps, chips and breakfast cereals.

The changes will block retailers from multibuy promotions such as ‘three for two’ offers on these products. 

Unhealthy promotions will no longer be featured in key locations, such as at checkouts, store entrances and aisle ends.

Online, they will be banned on home pages, main pages for other food categories and shopping basket or payment pages.

'Buy one get one free' deals on fizzy drinks, crisps and fatty foods will be banned in medium and large stores, as well as on websites, from April 2022 (file image)

‘Buy one get one free’ deals on fizzy drinks, crisps and fatty foods will be banned in medium and large stores, as well as on websites, from April 2022 (file image)

Ministers say that although promotions appear to help shoppers save money, data shows that such deals increase purchases of the products by almost 20 per cent as they encourage buyers to take more than they need or intended to snap up in the first place.

Curbs to make treats less tempting

Unhealthy deals will not be placed in store entrances, aisle ends and checkouts and their online equivalents such as home pages and shopping baskets.

Retailers will be banned from offering BOGOF or three for two offers on products high in fat, salt or sugar.

Free refills of sugary soft drinks to be banned in all restaurants.

Prepackaged food and drink that could be targeted includes cakes, ice cream, breakfast cereals, pizza, crisps and chips.

Public health minister Jo Churchill said: ‘Creating an environment which helps everyone eat healthier foods more regularly is crucial to improving the health of the nation.’

Plans to curb unhealthy multibuys were first announced in the Government’s obesity strategy earlier this year. 

In the New Year, Public Health England will launch a ‘Better Health Campaign’, with adverts on TV and online to inspire and support people to maintain a healthy weight.

Obesity is one of the biggest health crises the country faces, with almost two-thirds of adults in England being overweight or living with obesity.

One in three children leave primary school overweight or obese, while obesity-related illnesses cost the NHS £6billion a year. 

Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of charity Action on Sugar, said: ‘Finally, Downing Street is acting decisively with a bold first step to restrict the sale of junk food on multi-buy offers and at checkouts, and taking on one of the biggest threats to Britain’s future health – childhood obesity.

‘Putting junk food multi-buy offers in the aisles and at the checkouts is just another way of food companies sneaking their unhealthy products into your basket. 

‘Now is the time for healthier food to take centre stage.’

Ministers say the location of products within stores can significantly affect purchases by shoppers, with end of aisle displays shown to increase soft drink sales by more than 50 per cent.

The restrictions on promotions will only apply to medium and large businesses – those with 50 or more employees. 

The location curbs will apply to stores over 2,000 square feet, with specialist retailers exempt.

Categories
Headlines UK London

Drink-driving e-scooter rider, 22, banned from the road for 20 months

Drink-driving e-scooter rider, 22, who was spotted weaving dangerously through traffic before narrowly missing a police car is banned from the road for 20 months

  • Mohamed Shardi, 22, was stopped by a routine patrol in Brixton, south London
  • Officers noticed the e-scooter being driven dangerously through lanes of traffic
  • He was arrested, breathalysed and found to be two times the drink-drive limit
  • Shardi, of Streatham, London, pleaded guilty to one count of drink-driving 

A drink-driving e-scooter rider who was stopped by officers after he narrowly missed hitting their police car been banned from the roads for 20 months.

Mohamed Shardi, 22, was stopped by a routine police patrol in Brixton, south London, after he was spotted riding dangerously through traffic.

The officers noticed the e-scooter being driven dangerously and weaving in and out of two lanes of traffic on August 8.

At one stage, he narrowly missed striking their police car with the scooter. When stopped, Shardi was said to be argumentative and unsteady on his feet.

He admitted drinking two bottles of beer, however he refused to be breathalysed.

Mohamed Shardi, 22, was stopped by a routine patrol in Brixton, south London, after he was spotted riding an e-scooter (pictured: Library image) dangerously through traffic

Shardi, from Streatham, south London was subsequently arrested and taken to a police station.

He was breathalysed and found to be two times the drink driving limit. He later defaced the cell with excrement.

Shardi appeared at Croydon Magistrates’ Court on Monday and pleaded guilty to  drink driving, driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence, driving with no insurance and criminal damage to a police cell

At court, Shardi was disqualified from holding or obtaining a driving license for 20 months and handed fines totalling nearly £410.

Part of the fine includes payment for the damage to the police cell.

Police Sergeant Darren Watson of the Met Police who arrested Shardi, said: ‘I am pleased with these results.

Shardi appeared at Croydon Magistrates' Court (pictured) on Monday and pleaded guilty to drink driving, driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence, driving with no insurance and criminal damage to a police cell

Shardi appeared at Croydon Magistrates’ Court (pictured) on Monday and pleaded guilty to drink driving, driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence, driving with no insurance and criminal damage to a police cell

‘Shardi knew he had been drinking and yet he still got on his scooter and in doing so showed little disregard for the law, his safety and that of other road users.

‘E-scooters are currently illegal to drive anywhere apart from on private land. Please think about this before you use them on the roads.’

Under current legislation, the riding of private e-scooters on the road or in a public place remains illegal.

Categories
Headlines UK London

Millions of Britons banned from going abroad or staying overnight after being plunged into Tier 4

Christmas has been cancelled for millions of people living in London, the south-east of England and Wales after Boris Johnson announced a new lockdown.

The Prime Minister made the surprise announcement today that a new ‘Tier 4’ was to be introduced from midnight tonight.

It is similar to the national lockdown in November with non-essential retail, gyms, cinemas, hairdressers and bowling alleys will be forced to close for two weeks – while people will be restricted to meeting one other person from another household in an outdoor public space.

Only days ago, Mr Johnson claimed it was ‘inhumane’ to cancel the Christmas holiday.

But he claimed today that the new measures are needed to combat a new strain of Covid called VUI202012/01, which is said to be up to 70 per cent more contagious.

Only days ago, Mr Johnson claimed it was ‘inhumane’ to cancel the Christmas holiday. He claimed he made the new announcements ‘with a heavy heart’

Speaking to a Downing Street news conference, Boris Johnson announced the new measures ‘with a heavy heart’.

He said: ‘I know how much emotion people invest in this time of year, and how important it is, for instance, for grandparents to see their grandchildren, for families to be together.

‘So I know how disappointing this will be. But we have said throughout this pandemic that we must and we will be guided by the science.

‘When the science changes, we must change our response.’

The news was met by fierce criticism, including from Conservative MPs.

Tory rebel Stever Baker tweeted: ‘Sad day. Lockdowns have failed in slowing the transmission of Covid. 

‘Now Govt expects people to sacrifice sharing Xmas with family & friends, just a few days after promising the opposite

‘We need a clear exit strategy from this nightmarish, cycle of damaging lockdowns.’

Conservative Member of Parliament for Buckingham constituency, Greg Smith, tweeted: ‘The tier 4 ruling brings more devastation to communities across the Buckingham constituency – when we should not have even been in tier 3 anyway. 

‘Parliament must be recalled, these measures subject to full scrutiny and voted on.’

The rest of England will see the Christmas “bubble” policy – allowing up to three household to meet up over the holiday period – severely curtailed, applying on Christmas Day only.

People throughout England are advised to "stay local" and avoid overseas travel, while those in Tier 4 will only be able to go abroad for essential business

People throughout England are advised to “stay local” and avoid overseas travel, while those in Tier 4 will only be able to go abroad for essential business

Under the new “stay at home” order – covering around a third of the population of England – people in Tier 4 will be told they should not stay away from home overnight and people from outside will be advised not to visit Tier 4 areas.

People throughout England are advised to “stay local” and avoid overseas travel, while those in Tier 4 will only be able to go abroad for essential business.

The new Tier 4 restrictions will apply in all Tier 3 areas in the South East – covering Kent, Buckinghamshire, Berkshire, Surrey (excluding Waverley), Gosport, Havant, Portsmouth, Rother and Hastings.

It will also apply in London (all 32 boroughs and the City of London) and the East of England – Bedford, Central Bedford, Milton Keynes, Luton, Peterborough, Hertfordshire and Essex (excluding Colchester, Uttlesford and Tendring).

Exemptions to the “stay at home” message which applied in the November lockdown, will also apply in the new Tier 4 – including support bubbles, childcare bubbles and children whose parents are separated.

People will be allowed to travel for education, childcare and to go to work if they cannot work from home and they will be permitted unlimited outdoor exercise.

The new rules come from the advice of the government’s new Emerging Respiratory Virus Threats Advisory Group (NervTag).

The Cabinet Office minister Michael Gove has briefed the devolved administrations for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland on the group’s findings.

Categories
Entertainment UK

Katie Price ‘devastated’ as petition calls for her to be banned from having pets

Katie Price is ‘devastated’ after a petition resurfaced calling on her to be banned from keeping pets.

The petition was initially started after the mother-of-five’s French Bulldog puppy Rolo died three weeks after she bought him for 13-year-old Princess in July, to help her move on from the loss of a dog that had been run over.

A spokeswoman for Katie said the telly star was “devastated” at the petition.

She claimed it was “unkind” and “based on hearsay” and insisted “Katie loves her animals”.

Katie Price is seen cuddling her puppy Rolo, who died in July of accidental suffocation, three weeks after joining the family

The petition, signed by some 5,700, states: “A puppy has died in Katie Price’s care… In the last 5 years more animals have died from lack of care. Horses, dogs, cats, lizards, hedgehogs.

“This isn’t a single family tragedy. It’s a common thing in Katie Price’s home.”

It continued: “Two dogs have been ran over. Puppies were found dead drowning in a neglected swimming pool. A horse was run over on a motorway.”

Katie adopted this dog, seen with son Harvey, in September
Katie adopted this dog, seen with son Harvey, in September

Rolo died after he got stuck under an armchair, with Katie later explaining on YouTube that she was “utterly devastated”.

Sitting alongside her daughter, Katie, 42, said: “At the end of the day, Princess’ dog Rolo tragically died and we’re absolutely devastated.

“As a mum, the reason I got Princess another dog was because she was do distraught, like I was, about her dog Sparkle getting run over.”

And asked people to stop “trolling” the family.

Keen equestrian Katie has a house full of animals; here her daughter Bunny is seen on her horse
Keen equestrian Katie has a house full of animals; here her daughter Bunny is seen on her horse

Katie said: “Just let us grieve and get on with it. Obviously we’ve had to tell you what’s happened because it’s one of the worst things to see a lifeless puppy there who was fine five minutes before, because it came to see me.”

The family have suffered a number of tragic losses when it comes to their pets.

In February, Alsatian Sparkle was killed after being hit by a car.

Katie’s dog Queenie died in similar circumstances, after being run over by a pizza delivery van.

Katie Price
Katie poses with one of her cats and a dog this week

The family also had a pet chameleon named Marvin who died, and one of Katie’s horses was killed in a crash too.

Since Rolo’s death, the family have added a new dog to the family – tiny Precious. They also have Sid and protection dog Blade, along with cats.