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Police chief’s daughter, 19, breaks lockdown rules at illegal party

Amy Slattery (above) broke lockdown rules to party at her university halls of residence

The student daughter of a senior police chief has been caught on video at an illegal party brazenly flouting lockdown restrictions.

Second-year undergraduate Amy Slattery, 19, is seen dancing along to ‘Murder on the Dancefloor’ with other students at Leeds Beckett University in the clip from a boozy Saturday night party where no masks or social distancing were evident.

Her father, Cumbria Police Assistant Chief Constable Andy Slattery, has been at the forefront of the fight to control the pandemic and is chair of the county’s multi-agency Covid-19 Strategic Coordination Group.

The damning video footage of Amy and her mates in Leeds was posted to Snapchat by a fellow reveller from the event at 3am on Sunday. It is believed to have been held in one of the university’s halls of residence.

The day after the party, the university tweeted on its official account: ‘Unfortunately a small number of students have breached the regulations by organising or attending parties/gatherings in halls, putting the safety and welfare of other residents and staff at risk.’

The second year student, 19, was seen on camera dancing at the party that lasted until 3am on Sunday

Her father is Cumbria Police Assistant Chief Constable Andy Slattery, who warns people to stay indoors

Ms Slattery, 19, a second year student, was seen (left) dancing at the party that lasted until 3am on Sunday. Her father is Cumbria Police Assistant Chief Constable Andy Slattery (right)

The young people in the video were clearly making no attempt to take precautions against Covid-19 as the music boomed out, despite the fact that Leeds has been hard-hit by the virus.

A source told MailOnline they had been ‘utterly disgusted’ to witness the footage from the party.

‘Of course, it’s not just Amy who was behaving irresponsibly, but given who her father is, it’s outrageous that she has ignored all the rules in this way.

Ms Slattery was one of a number of students criticised by her university for breaking rules

Ms Slattery was one of a number of students criticised by her university for breaking rules

‘Her dad is never off the local TV and radio, rightly ramming home the message that we must all adhere to the laws on wearing facemasks and maintaining a safe distance if we’re to stay safe from this disease.

‘Andy takes all this very seriously. This won’t go down well at all.’

More than 1,000 people in the city have died since the start of the pandemic, and many areas of the city are still seeing above average infection rates.

ACC Slattery appears frequently on local media giving advice to the public on anti-Covid laws, and recently featured nationally when he pleaded with day-trippers to avoid driving to the Lake District to reduce infection.

In an interview with BBC Cumbria, earlier this month, he explained there had been 559 breaches in the county, resulting in 68 people being issued with a fixed penalty notice.

He said: ‘The virus doesn’t spread itself, the virus came here from the South East very quickly because it travels with people moving around the country and the government scientists are very clear that we’ve got to reduce the number of people travelling around the country and that’s why this stay local message is very important.’

On January 10, a week before the party, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust was one of five major trusts in England which ran out of adult critical care beds. 

Universities have been regarded as a key driver in spreading the virus not only within cities, but also across the country as students travel to and from home.

Mr Slattery (pictured), 53, joined the force in 1991, after graduating with a BA (hons) in Sociology from Lancaster University and was promoted to ACC in April 2019

Mr Slattery (pictured), 53, joined the force in 1991, after graduating with a BA (hons) in Sociology from Lancaster University and was promoted to ACC in April 2019

In his role as chair of Cumbria's multi-agency Covid-19 Strategic Coordination Group, Mr Slattery has often tweeted telling people to stay home and only go out when necessary

In his role as chair of Cumbria’s multi-agency Covid-19 Strategic Coordination Group, Mr Slattery has often tweeted telling people to stay home and only go out when necessary  

Statisticians have found that infection rates often rise more rapidly in areas with a high density of students in major university cities such as Leeds, Manchester and Sheffield.

Mr Slattery, 53, joined the force in 1991, after graduating with a BA (hons) in Sociology from Lancaster University and was promoted to ACC in April 2019.

Having been a detective in every rank of the force he has previously held posts as Head of Serious and Organised Crime, Counter Terrorism, Public Protection and Intelligence, taking on the role of Detective Chief Superintendent, Head of Crime in October 2016.

The Cumbrian-born officer lives with his family in the county, and is a competitive fell-runner, ultra distance runner and a member of the Bob Graham Club, whose members run up and down as many Lake District hills in 24 hours as possible.

Amy, who is a keen runner herself, attended the exclusive £25,500-a-year mixed independent Sedbergh School in Cumbria.

When MailOnline called at Mr Slattery’s home, his wife Rachel, 52, replied: ‘It’s nothing to do with me, sorry’ and closed the door.’ 

Leeds Beckett University tweeted its disappointment (above) that students who attended parties, putting the safety and welfare of other students and staff at risk faced a £500 fine

Leeds Beckett University tweeted its disappointment (above) that students who attended parties, putting the safety and welfare of other students and staff at risk faced a £500 fine

Cumbria Deputy Chief Constable Mark Webster said in a statement: ‘We have been made aware of a video which appears to show a number of individuals at a party in another police force area. Any investigation into that is a matter for the local force concerned.

‘However, we are at a critical stage in the pandemic and the rules and guidance are clear. It is incumbent on everyone to comply, to ensure that we reduce the spread of infection.

‘In line with our policy throughout the pandemic we do not identify or single out individuals that have breached, or are alleged to have breached, restrictions – and this instance is no different.

‘Cumbria Constabulary continues to encourage everyone to follow the restrictions, which are in place to stop the spread of the virus, protect the NHS and save lives.’

A Leeds Beckett University spokesperson said: ‘The majority of students act responsibly and all Leeds Beckett students have been made aware of their personal and collective obligations when it comes to safety, social distancing and government guidelines on Covid-19.

Miss Slattery (centre) recently posted this photo on Instagram with her mother Rachel (left) and her father Andy (right) and captioned it 'my quarantine buddies'

Miss Slattery (centre) recently posted this photo on Instagram with her mother Rachel (left) and her father Andy (right) and captioned it ‘my quarantine buddies’

‘Where students are found to have breached the regulations by organising or attending parties in halls we act swiftly to investigate and take action as necessary.

‘Students who break the law by organising or attending parties in halls will face disciplinary action which could lead to a fine of up to £500 under the Student Code of Conduct.’

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Technology US

Biden plans Inauguration Day Snapchat filter alongside locked-down live event

With an ongoing pandemic and an unprecedented lockdown of the nation’s capital, Joe Biden’s inauguration will look different from those that came before it.

The Biden inaugural committee has already planned a week of extensive televised events — like live performances from Lady Gaga and Fall Out Boy — but to try to recreate the camaraderie of a live event, the team has also come up with a new way for supporters to participate virtually.

On Wednesday, Biden’s team will launch a Snapchat filter that transports users to the Capitol to participate from home. Once the inaugural filter is selected in the Snapchat reel, users can take a selfie in front of the Capitol as confetti falls from above. If users flip the camera around, they’ll be greeted by a Biden Jumbotron in front of a crowd of inauguration attendees whose faces are selfies sent in by supporters online.

Biden’s Inauguration Day Snapchat filter in selfie mode.

The filter will play an exclusive message from Biden directly addressing Snapchatters. “Hey Snapchat!! It’s me, Joe. Welcome to inauguration!” he says.

The filter will also direct users who access it to a live stream of the inauguration event on Wednesday.

“This year’s inauguration has allowed us to create new, innovative, and creative tools for Americans across the country to participate in inaugural traditions and ceremonies while staying home to keep everyone safe,” said Christian Tom, digital director for the presidential inaugural committee. “We are excited for President-elect Biden to share his message around unifying the country with folks on Snapchat and invite them to be a part of this historic inaugural.”

Security measures have rendered traditional selfies impossible, as much of Washington, DC has been placed under lockdown in the wake of the Capitol riot. The FBI has warned of planned armed protests in the area, which encouraged the Department of Homeland Security to launch an inaugural security operation to keep the White House and Capitol safe through the inauguration events. Around 21,000 National Guard members will be in DC on Wednesday to help secure the event.

The inauguration Snapchat filter builds on the augmented reality tech Biden’s campaign used last year to get out the vote. In one filter ahead of Election Day, users could point their cameras at USPS mail boxes and receive directions on how to vote by mail. Last September, the Biden team put out merch for players of Animal Crossing: New Horizons, and later that fall designed an entire island in the game for players to visit.

“We hope this tool will bring the inaugural experience to young Americans wherever they are and share it with their friends and families,” Tom said in a statement about the upcoming filter.

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Headlines UK

How Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey decided to ban Trump permanently

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was reluctant to ban President Donald Trump’s account, and only acted after his team said that Trump’s tweets were inspiring calls for violence among his supporters on Parler, according to a new report.

As well, anxious Twitter employees compared the situation to IBM’s work for the Nazis during World War II, pleading with him to ban Trump. 

Dorsey was working remotely a private island in French Polynesia on January 6 when Trump’s supporters stormed the U.S. Capitol, and his top lieutenants pushed to suspend the president’s account, according to an account in the New York Times.

Twitter was the first social media company to act against Trump after the Capitol riot, locking his account for 12 hours before ultimately issuing the permanent ban. Facebook, its subsidiary Instagram, and Snapchat quickly followed suit with indefinite bans.

Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey was reluctant to ban President Donald Trump’s account, and only acted after his team said that Trump’s tweets were inspiring calls for violence

Twitter was the first social media company to act against Trump after the Capitol riot, locking his account for 12 hours before ultimately issuing the permanent ban

Twitter was the first social media company to act against Trump after the Capitol riot, locking his account for 12 hours before ultimately issuing the permanent ban

How did IBM help Nazis during WWII?

Both the U.S. government and Nazi Germany used IBM punch-card technology for some parts of their internment camp operations and record keeping.

IBM’s German subsidiary was accused of helping with records at Nazi concentration camps. 

IBM says its German operation, along with those of other foreign companies, was effectively seized by the Nazis during the war. 

According to the Times, Dorsey signed off on the permanent ban after two of Trump’s January 8 tweets were seen to be inspiring radical responses among his supporters.

In one of the tweets, Trump said that he would not attend the presidential inauguration on January 20. In another, he called his supporters ‘great American Patriots’ and said they would ‘have a GIANT VOICE’ in the future.

The tweets were not explicit calls for violence, but Twitter’s safety team monitored the response on alternative social networking site Parler, which is popular among right-wingers, and told Dorsey that Trump’s supporters had seized on Trump’s latest tweets.

One Twitter employee saw a Trump fan on Parler urge militias to stop President-elect Joe Biden from entering the White House and to fight anyone who tried to halt them, according to the Times.

Twitter’s safety team alluded to the two Trump tweets in a public blog post about the ban, saying that they ‘were highly likely to encourage and inspire people to replicate the criminal acts that took place at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.’

Many Twitter employees had long called for Trump to be banned from the platform, but Dorsey was reluctant to take such a step.

Dorsey signed off on the permanent ban after two of Trump's January 8 tweets were seen to be inspiring radical responses among his supporters

Dorsey signed off on the permanent ban after two of Trump’s January 8 tweets were seen to be inspiring radical responses among his supporters

Dorsey had long defended the company’s policy of protecting the accounts of world leaders, arguing their public statements were newsworthy even when their tweets violated the company’s policies.

Prior to January 6, Twitter had only deleted the tweets of a world leader on two occasions, when the leaders of Brazil and Venezuela promoted fake cures for coronavirus.

Following the events of January 6, furious Twitter employees began circulating an internal petition calling anew for Trump’s ban. 

Several invoked IBM’s collaboration with the Nazis, saying that history would judge Twitter in the same light, current and former employees told the Times.

Dorsey acquiesced, but his mixed feelings on the issue were apparent in a lengthy public statement he issued on January 13, saying Twitter made the ‘right decision’ but adding the ban sets a dangerous precedent.

‘Having to take these actions fragment the public conversation. They divide us. They limit the potential for clarification, redemption, and learning. And sets a precedent I feel is dangerous: the power an individual or corporation has over a part of the global public conversation,’ Dorsey wrote. 

Following its ban on Trump, Twitter broadened its crackdown last weekend, banning 70,000 accounts it said were linked to the QAnon conspiracy theory, which proposes that Trump is fighting an evil global cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles.

Twitter said in a statement it had initiated the broader bans to ‘protect the conversation on our service from attempts to incite violence, organize attacks, and share deliberately misleading information about the election outcome.’ 

On Thursday, Dorsey held a virtual company meeting addressing the bans, video of which was quickly leaked by an employee to the conservative activist group Project Veritas.

His message to employees appeared to be that the ban on Trump was just the beginning of a sweeping new approach to moderation. 

Jack Dorsey, pictured in October testifying before Congress, held a virtual town hall this week

Jack Dorsey, pictured in October testifying before Congress, held a virtual town hall this week

He told staff in the clip: ‘You should always feel free to express yourself in whatever format manifestation feels right.

‘We do intend to do the full retro as I said in my note, it is going to take some time.

‘And then the other thing, just to close out a little bit: we are focused on one account right now. 

‘But this is going to be much bigger than just one account.

‘And it’s going to go on for much longer than just this day, this week. 

‘And the next few weeks and go on beyond the inauguration. We have to expect that, we have to be ready for that.’ 

Categories
Tech News

Snapchat Places Permanent Ban on Donald Trump’s Account


Image-centric social network Snapchat on Wednesday said it has permanently banned US President Donald Trump from the platform, as voices are raised against keeping him off the Internet stage.

Trump’s access to social media has been largely cut off since a violent mob of his supporters stormed the Capitol in Washington DC in a deadly attack on January 6.

Operators fear that Trump could use his Snapchat account to foment more unrest in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration.

“Last week we announced an indefinite suspension of president Trump’s Snapchat account,” Snapchat said in response to an AFP inquiry.

“In the interest of public safety, and based on his attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech, and incite violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently terminate his account.”

After the attack on the Capitol by Trump supporters, social media including Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube began to bar him from using their platforms.

Google and Apple pulled Parler apps from their shops for digital content shops stating that the right-leaning social network was allowing users to promote violence.

Amazon Web Services later ousted Parler from its data-centres, essentially forcing the social network offline due to lack of hosting services.

“I do not celebrate or feel pride in our having to ban @realDonaldTrump from Twitter, or how we got here,” Twitter chief Jack Dorsey wrote in a tweet Wednesday.

“After a clear warning we’d take this action, we made a decision with the best information we had based on threats to physical safety both on and off Twitter.”

The actions angered ardent defenders of Trump, who was impeached by the House of Representatives on Wednesday was for inciting “insurrection.”

Texas attorney general Ken Paxton on Wednesday said he is demanding that Amazon, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Twitter explain why Trump is not welcomed on their platforms.

Paxton maintained that the “seemingly coordinated de-platforming” of Trump “silences those whose speech and political beliefs do not align with leaders of Big Tech companies.”

The state attorney issued administrative subpoenas calling on the technology companies to share their policies and practices regarding content moderation as well as for information directly related to Parler social network.


What will be the most exciting tech launch of 2021? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.





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Headline USA Politics

Trump also runs out of Snapchat. Your account is permanently suspended | The State

A president without networks.

Photo:
MANDEL NGAN / AFP / Getty Images

The social network Snapchat announced this Wednesday that it decided to “permanently” suspend the account of President Donald Trump days after he announced the indefinite suspension of the profile of the Republican leader after the assault on the Capitol by his followers.

“In the interest of public safety, and based on their attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech and inciting violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently cancel your account, “said a spokesman for the social network quoted by CNN.

The spokesperson for Snap, owner of the social network of images that disappear after a few hours, said that after last week’s measure they were “evaluating what long-term action” was “the best for our community.”

Trump, who on Wednesday became the first US president to be politically prosecuted twice, this time accused of “Incitement to insurrection”, has faced different measures adopted by the main social networks in response to the violent assault against Capitol in Washington, in which five people died.

On Tuesday, YouTube announced that it decided to suspend the channel of Trump, who will not be able to upload new content for at least 7 days, almost the time remaining in his term.

YouTube detailed on its official Twitter account that the decision was made “in light of concerns about the continued potential for violence.”

The measure assumes that the ruler “temporarily cannot upload new content for a * minimum * of 7 days ”.

Last Friday, Twitter permanently suspended Trump’s account due to “the risk of further incitement to violence.” In that network, the preferred one by the president, Trump had issued more than 55,000 messages for more than eleven years and already had 89 million followers.

Facebook and Instagram they also blocked the president’s access to his account at least until the handover was completed on January 20, and Twitch deactivated his profile indefinitely.

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Categories
Technology US

Snapchat will permanently terminate Trump’s account

Snapchat will permanently terminate President Trump’s account, Snap announced on Wednesday. Snap had indefinitely suspended Trump’s account last week after he incited a pro-Trump mob to attack the US Capitol, and it has now made the decision to make that suspension permanent. The news was first reported by Axios.

“Last week we announced an indefinite suspension of President Trump’s Snapchat account, and have been assessing what long term action is in the best interest of our Snapchat community,” Snap said in a statement shared with The Verge. “In the interest of public safety, and based on his attempts to spread misinformation, hate speech, and incite violence, which are clear violations of our guidelines, we have made the decision to permanently terminate his account.”

Trump had attempted to violate Snapchat’s polices dozens of times, Snap tells The Verge. The company had also sent warnings to his team about content that violated the rules. The permanent ban officially goes into effect on January 20th.

The recent actions aren’t the only moves Snap has made to restrict Trump’s account — the company stopped promoting Trump’s account in its Discover tab back in June following tweets Trump posted in response to Black Lives Matter protests.

Snapchat joins Twitter in permanently banning Trump. Facebook has indefinitely banned Trump’s account, and Shopify has taken down Trump’s campaign store.

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The Buzz Tiktok Whatsapp

Facebook, WhatsApp, TikTok Top List of Most Popular Apps of 2020: App Annie


Market of mobile apps continued to grow in 2020 despite the coronavirus outbreak, with new app downloads growing seven percent year-over-year to 218 billion, according to a report. Consumer spending on app stores also resulted in a growth of 20 percent year-over-year. The expansion of app downloads and usage of smartphones has pushed mobile ad spend significantly. This has indeed helped app developers grow their earnings at a time when many professionals worldwide lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

Consumers spending on app stores comprising Google Play, Apple’s App Store, and third-party app stores hit $143 billion (roughly Rs. 10,45,988 crores) in 2020, mobile analytics firm App Annie said in its annual State of Mobile industry report. The spending was led by China, followed by the US and Japan.

App stores spend grew 20 percent year-over-year to $143 billion (roughly Rs. 10,45,988 crores) in 2020
Photo Credit: App Annie

 

Time spent on mobile devices also grew significantly in 2020 — owing to the COVID-19 pandemic that locked most of the world’s population at their homes. App Annie’s report mentioned that particularly in the US, time spent on mobile was eight percent more than the time spent on watching live TV. Consumers globally spent as much as 3.5 trillion hours particularly on Android phones, the firm noted.

In India, the average hours spent on mobile per day grew to 4.6 hours from 3.3 hours in 2019. Similar trends was observed in markets including China, Japan, South Korea, and the UK, among others.

The increased time spent on mobile devices wasn’t limited to a certain demographic. App Annie underlined that in the US particularly, Gen Z, Millennials, and Gen X/ Baby Boomers spent 16 percent, 18 percent, and 30 percent more time year-over-year, respectively. However, there were some differences on which apps certain demographics spent their most time.

Snapchat, Twitch, TikTok, ROBLOX, and Spotify were the most likely apps to use among Gen Z users, while Millennials preferred Discord, LinkedIn, PayPal, Pandora Music, and Amazon Music. Gen X/ Baby Boomers, on the other hand, spent their most time on Ring, Nextdoor, The Weather Channel, Kindle, and ColorNote Notepad Notes, according to the firm.

Among other apps, TikTok outcast the top social apps with up to 325 percent year-over-year growth in hours per user. That growth came irrespective of the ban in India and government criticism in markets including the US. App Annie projects that TikTok is on track to reach 1.2 billion active users in 2021.

WhatsApp, however, led the race in markets including India. Average time spent on the instant messaging app in the country grew to 21.3 hours per month from 17.2 hours in 2019.

The growth in time spent and app store downloads also helped developers earn more in 2020. App Annie mentioned in the report that 25 percent more app developers earned over $2 million (roughly Rs. 14.62 crores) per annum through app stores. Apple also recently announced its programme to cut its commission rate from 30 percent to 15 percent. That move would help 97 percent of developers who monetise through the App Store.

Mobile app market also attracted investors. Global funding to mobile technology companies from 2016 to 2020 more than doubled compared to the previous five years, App Annie reported. Investment capital poured into mobile companies also grew 27 percent year-over-year to $73 billion (roughly Rs. 5,33,939 crores) particularly in 2020.

In terms of mobile gaming, casual games dominated the market with 78 percent of total game downloads. Among Us, ROBLOX, and My Talking Tom Friends were amongst the most downloaded games. Mobile gaming market is also believed to be on track to cross the mark of $120 billion (roughly Rs. 8,77,728 crores) in consumer spend in 2021.

Alongside mobile games, finance apps saw a growth of 45 percent year-over-year worldwide outside of China in 2020. The case was, however, different in China. It was due to the new legislation in the peer-to-peer lending space, App Annie noted.

As people were mostly staying indoors in 2020, the annual report shows that 40 percent more hours streamed on mobile. YouTube saw up to six times increase in time spent per user when compared with the next closest app. It also ruled the market in average time spent per user per month, according to the report.

Business apps including Zoom and Google Meet also saw an uptick of 275 percent in the fourth quarter as people largely started working from home and embraced the concept of remote learning.

Facebook dominated the list of top apps with most monthly active users worldwide, with its native app securing the first position followed by WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger, and Instagram. However, TikTok emerged as the most downloaded app in 2020, followed by Facebook, WhatsApp, and Zoom.

On the gaming front, PUBG Mobile led the market in terms of having the most monthly active users. Candy Crush Saga, Ludo King, and Among Us came second, third, and fourth. However, Free Fire topped the most downloads chart, followed by Among Us, Subway Surfers, and PUBG Mobile.

Tinder emerged as the leading app with most consumer spend in the year, while in terms of mobile games, Honour of Kings beat the competition.


What will be the most exciting tech launch of 2021? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.



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Tech News

Donald Trump Sees Digital Downfall in US Capitol Violence Aftermath


Donald Trump faced quite a lot of backlash following violent protest at the US Capitol by Trump supporters. The event, that disrupted the Electoral College debate and lead to the death of five people, was said to have been instigated by Trump’s social media messages ever since the November presidential election. As a result, Trump’s social media accounts on Twitter, Facebook, and Snapchat have been removed, right-leaning social media app Parler has been suspended from Google Play, and pro-Trump subreddit ‘r/DonaldTrump’ has been blocked by Reddit.

Donald Trump’s digital presence has been cut down significantly after protests at Capitol Hill by his supporters. On January 7, during the Electoral College Debate, a large group of Trump supporters stormed the building and entered the Senate chamber where election results were being certified. The protests have been blamed on Trump’s tweets and posts on various social media platforms where he claimed that the November 3 election was rigged and stolen from him. He had also urged his supporters to march on the Capitol.

Following the US Capitol violence, Trump’s social media handles on Facebook and Instagram were indefinitely banned for inciting violence against a democratically-elected government. Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg put out a statement announcing the ban on Trump’s accounts and said, “The shocking events of the last 24 hours clearly demonstrate that President Donald Trump intends to use his remaining time in office to undermine the peaceful and lawful transition of power to his elected successor, Joe Biden.”

Twitter then shared a blog post where it announced that the @realDonaldTrump account has been permanently suspended “due to the risk of further incitement of violence.” Trump still had access to the presidential @POTUS and @WhiteHouse accounts. However, a new report from The Verge states that his tweets from these accounts are being deleted. This was confirmed by BuzzFeed executive editor Mat Honan on Twitter. Not just that, the Twitter account of Gary Coby, the digital director for Trump’s 2020 campaign, has also been suspended.

Snapchat also locked Trump out of the photo-sharing platform amid concerns of his dangerous rhetoric. During the siege of Capitol Hill, Trump released a video on social media in which he repeated the false claim of election fraud and told the mob “we love you,” and went on to ask them to go home. YouTube removed the video in line with its policy barring claims challenging election results.

Parler, the app that became home to right-leaning social media users after Donald Trump supporters urged Twitter users to join the platform, has been suspended from Google Play for having posts inciting violence. Apple gave the app 24 hours to remove all objectionable content and submit a detailed moderation plan.

Furthermore, r/DonaltTrump – a subreddit on popular social media platform Reddit – that was the unofficial pro-Trump forum has also been banned, as pointed out by Axios reporter Sara Fischer on Twitter.


What will be the most exciting tech launch of 2021? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.

 





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California Headline USA Minnesota New York

Student says he has no regrets about sharing video of white high school classmate using racial slur

A Virginia student says he has no regrets about sharing a video online of a white high school classmate using a racial slur that forced her to withdraw from her dream college. 

Jimmy Galligan, of Leesburg, revealed to the New York Times how he had been in history class at Heritage High School last year when he received a text from a friend which included a video of classmate Mimi Groves using a racial epithet.

The three-second clip, sent by Groves to a friend on Snapchat in 2016, showed the then-15-year-old freshman looking into the camera saying ‘I can drive, n*****s’ as she was sitting in traffic.

Galligan said he had flagged the clip to teachers and administrators but his complaints reportedly yielded no response.

Frustrated and angry, Galligan said he decided to hold onto the video until he thought it was the right time to post it publicly. He posted it in June this year.

‘I wanted to get her where she would understand the severity of that word,’ 18-year-old Galligan, whose mother is black and father is white, told the Times.

‘If I never posted that video, nothing would have ever happened. I’m going to remind myself, you started something,’ he continued. ‘You taught someone a lesson.’

Jimmy Galligan

Mimi Groves, 19, (left) sent a video to a friend on Snapchat in 2016, showing her ‘I can drive n*****s’. Jimmy Galligan (right) kept hold of the video after growing frustrated that teachers failed to take action

The three second clip showed the then-15-year-old freshman looking into the camera as she used the racial epithet 

Groves’ video had originally circulated among some students at Heritage High shortly after she recorded it in 2016, but it reportedly did not cause much of a stir.

Galligan said the racial slur used by Groves had regularly been hurled in classrooms and in hallways during his time in the Loudon County School district.

He also said he hadn’t seen the video prior to receiving it last summer, when both her and Groves were seniors.

Groves, a championship-winning cheerleader, was planning to attend the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, whose cheer team were reigning national champions. She was accepted into the team in May.

Weeks later, following the Memorial Day police killing of George Floyd in Minnesota, racial injustice protests broke out across the nation.

In response, in a public Instagram post in June, Groves urged people to ‘protest, donate, sign a petition, rally, and do something’ to help support the Black Lives Matter movement.

One responder to the post, who Groves said she didn’t know, reportedly replied: ‘You have the audacity to post this, after saying the N-word.’

Groves said her confusion quickly turned to panic as friends began calling her and directing her to outrage that was erupting on social media.

As it would later transpire, Galligan had publicly posted the Snapchat video from four years ago to Instagram earlier that afternoon, having waited until she had selected a college.

Within a matter of hours, the clip had been shared widely across social media, including on TikTok and Twitter.

As views of the footage continued to mount, as did furious calls from members of the public demanding the University of Tennessee revoke its admission offer to Groves.

Mimi Groves was accepted onto UT's Cheerleading team in May. Weeks later, the video of her using the slur was uploaded by Galligan and she was forced to withdraw from the team

Mimi Groves was accepted onto UT’s Cheerleading team in May. Weeks later, the video of her using the slur was uploaded by Galligan and she was forced to withdraw from the team

Groves insists he has no regrets, and says nothing would have been done unless he'd posted the video to social media

Groves seen above on TikTok

Groves insists he has no regrets, and says nothing would have been done unless he’d posted the video to social media

In the weeks that followed the killing of George Floyd, teenagers leveraging social media to call out classmates and peers for racist behavior became common place across the country.

In many cases, anonymous pages on Instagram were set up devoted to holding classmates accountable and Loudoun County was no exception, the Times reported.

In the case of Groves, within two days, she was kicked off the university’s cheer team and forced to withdraw from UT under pressure from admission officials, citing hundreds of emails and phone calls from outraged former and current students.

‘They’re angry, and they want to see some action,’ an administration official told Groves and her family, as reported by the Times.

In a thread posted to Twitter on June 4, the university wrote: ‘The University of Tennessee has received several reports of racist remarks and actions on social media by past, present, and future members of our community.

‘The university takes seriously our commitment to fostering a Volunteer community that values equity, inclusion, and that promotes respect for all people. We have a responsibility to support our black students and create a place where all Vols feel safe.

‘On Wednesday, following a racist video and photo surfacing on social media, Athletics made the decision not to allow a prospective student to join the Spirit Program. She will not be attending the university this fall.’

Students of Heritage High School said racism had long been tolerated at the school and wider district

Students of Heritage High School said racism had long been tolerated at the school and wider district

Groves would become one of many incoming freshman across the US who saw their admission offers revoked after similar footage emerged on social media showing them using racist language.

In Groves’ case, which occurred in one of the nation’s wealthiest school districts, students claimed racism had long been tolerated or overlooked at the school.

‘It was just always very uncomfortable being Black in the classroom,’ said Muna Barry, who was in the same school year as Groves and Galligan.

Some students told the Times they were told by white counterparts to ‘Go pick cotton,’ while Berry said gym teachers at her elementary school once organized an ‘Underground Railroad’ game, where students were forced to run through an obstacle course in the dark and would be forced to start over if they made a noise. The Underground Railroad was a network of secret routes and safe houses used by enslaved African-Americans to escape their captures to freedom.

Galligan himself said he recalled being mocked with a racial slur by white classmates after their senior-year English teacher played an audio recording of the 1902 novella ‘Heart of Darkness’ that contained racist language.

One of the classmates who mocked him, Galligan said, later went on to make threatening comments about Muslims in an Instagram post.

Galligan said he showed the footage to the principal who declined to take action on account of ‘free speech’.

‘I just felt so hopeless,’ he told the Times.

A report commissioned last year by the school district documented a pattern of school leaders ignoring the widespread use of racial slurs by both students and teachers.

‘It is shocking the extent to which students report the use of the N-word as the prevailing concern,’ the report read, according to the Times, adding that employees had ‘a low level of racial consciousness and racial literacy,’ while a lack of repercussions for hurtful language forced students into a ‘hostile learning environment.’

In the report’s wake, the district released a plan to combat systemic racism in August. Heritage High School did not respond to a Times request for comment.

In the case of Groves, within two days, she was kicked off the university’s cheer team and forced to withdraw from UT under pressure from admission officials, citing hundreds of emails and phone calls from outraged former and current students

In the case of Groves, within two days, she was kicked off the university’s cheer team and forced to withdraw from UT under pressure from admission officials, citing hundreds of emails and phone calls from outraged former and current students

Reflecting on the backlash caused by her video, Groves said at the time she ‘didn’t understand the severity of the word, or the history and context behind it because I was so young.’

She continued by telling the Times the same slur she used regularly featured in the songs she and her friends listened to, but added: ‘I’m not using that as an excuse.’

‘It disgusts me that those words would ever come out of my mouth,’ she continued. ‘How can you convince somebody that has never met you and the only thing they’ve ever seen of you is that three-second clip?’

Groves said racial slurs or any kind of hate speech has never been tolerated inside her family home. Her mother, Marsha Groves, said the whole family has been suffering with the consequences of her daughter’s actions.

When the footage went viral, a second image captioned with a racial slur surfaced online, though the family claim it was doctored to further damage Groves’ reputation.

Now 19, Groves said she was also threatened with violence if she ever stepped foot on the campus of UT.

Marsha said her daughter was being targeted by a ‘mob’ of social media users for a mistake she made as an adolescent.

‘We just needed it to stop, so we withdrew her,’ Marsha told the Times, adding the three second video had ruined 12 years of her daughter’s hard work.

‘They rushed to judgment and unfortunately it’s going to affect her for the rest of her life.’

‘I wanted to get her where she would understand the severity of that word,’ 18-year-old Galligan, whose mother is black and father is white, told the Times

The video containing racist language filmed by Groves is show above

‘I wanted to get her where she would understand the severity of that word,’ 18-year-old Galligan, whose mother is black and father is white, told the Times 

In the six months since Galligan posted the video online, Groves has enrolled in online classes at a local community college while Galligan is now a freshman at California’s Vanguard University.

‘I’ve learned how quickly social media can take something they know very little about, twist the truth and potentially ruin somebody’s life,’ Groves said.

Groves and Galligan were reportedly once friendly in high school but have never spoken about the incident directly.

One of her friends, who is black, said Groves apologized for the video long before in went viral last summer.

The friend, who wasn’t named, said she also defended Groves online, which led to her receiving critical messages from strangers online.

‘We’re supposed to educate people,’ she wrote in a post to Snapchat, according to the Times, ‘not ruin their lives because you want to feel a sense of empowerment.’

Groves, meanwhile, insists he has no regrets.

‘If I never posted that video, nothing would have ever happened,’ he said, adding the clip will always be available to watch online.

‘I’m going to remind myself, you started something,’ he said according to the Times. ‘You taught someone a lesson.’

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Headline USA

Man claims he caught girlfriend swiping through TINDER after he saw the app reflected in her eyes

A man is going viral for claiming that he caught his girlfriend cheating on Tinder by seeing the app reflected in her eyes.

Sam Nunn, believed to be from the US, made the allegation on TikTok this weekend, sharing a video of his girlfriend lying in bed, looking at her phone.

When he zooms in on her eyes, though, they reflect her phone screen, which shows her swiping through the dating app Tinder. 

Viral video: A man is going viral for claiming that he caught his girlfriend cheating on Tinder by seeing the app reflected in her eyes

Close-up: When he zooms in the video as close as he can on her eyes, the reflection shows that she appears to be looking at a picture of a man

Close-up: When he zooms in the video as close as he can on her eyes, the reflection shows that she appears to be looking at a picture of a man

She then swipes across the screen, and another man's picture pops up.

She swipes again to show another picture, and it becomes clear she is swiping through Tinder

Swiping? She then swipes across the screen, and another man’s picture pops up. She swipes again to show another picture, and it becomes clear she is swiping through Tinder

Sam’s video has already racked up three quarters of a million views on the platform.

The video shows a close-up of a woman’s face as she lays on her side in bed, scrolling through her phone.

When he zooms in the video as close as he can on her eyes, the reflection shows that she appears to be looking at a picture of a man.

She then swipes across the screen, and another man’s picture pops up. She swipes again to show another picture, and it becomes clear she is swiping through Tinder.

The video then cuts to Sam, who looks sad and shakes his head. 

Though the video implies that he caught his girlfriend looking for another date online, his Twitter bio currently reads, ‘it was a joke.’

It’s unclear if his bio is referring to the viral cheating video or something else.

Oh well... The video then cuts to Sam Nunn, who looks sad and shakes his head

Oh well… The video then cuts to Sam Nunn, who looks sad and shakes his head

When commenters asked him if the video was real, he answered: ‘Yeah.’ 

Other commenters called the woman ‘heartless’ and wanted Sam to record another video of him dumping her. 

If the TikTok video is, in fact, a joke, Sam may have been inspired to make it by another viral clip that earned 2.6 million views after it was uploaded back in November.

Sydney Kinsch, 24, revealed how her relationship ended on the app, sharing the selfie that her (presumably) now-ex-boyfriend sent her via Snapchat.

Before hitting ‘send,’ the two-timing dunce apparently failed to notice the reflection in his sunglasses, which showed another woman’s legs lounging in the car next to him — but Sydney certainly didn’t miss it. 

Whoops! Sydney Kinsch, 24, revealed how her relationship ended in a viral TikTok video, showing the selfie her boyfriend of four years sent her on Snapchat

Whoops! Sydney Kinsch, 24, revealed how her relationship ended in a viral TikTok video, showing the selfie her boyfriend of four years sent her on Snapchat

‘That one time my boyfriend of 4 years snapchatted me him cheating on me,’ Sydney wrote in the video.

The short clip shows her standing in front of the selfie, covering half of her ex’s face.

In the image, he is in a car wearing black sunglasses, and in the frame that’s visible, his arm on the steering wheel is reflected back at the camera — which is concerning enough, as the young man appears to have taken the photo of himself while driving.

But Sydney then shifts to the other side of the picture, revealing the other lens. And there, the reflection is also quite clear: a woman’s bear legs, propped up on the inside of the car with her feet out the window.

‘Check the reflection in your boyfriend’s sunnies ladies,’ Sydney captioned the clip. 

Not so smart! The man didn't realize that the woman sitting comfortably in the car next to him was reflected in his sunglasses

Not so smart! The man didn’t realize that the woman sitting comfortably in the car next to him was reflected in his sunglasses

Suspicious: The boyfriend tried to claim it was his friend's girlfriend and he's 'allowed to have friends.' Sydney later learned he's been with five different women in the past month alone

Suspicious: The boyfriend tried to claim it was his friend’s girlfriend and he’s ‘allowed to have friends.’ Sydney later learned he’s been with five different women in the past month alone

In the comments section, she went on to share more details, revealing that things got even worse after she got the photo.

‘I called him and asked if he realized he sent me a b***h in his Snapchat and he had no idea’ she wrote. ‘So I sent it to him and he called me crazy and that it was our friend’s gf and [that] he’s allowed to have friends.’

She later learned that he as been seeing at least five other women on the side in the past month alone.

Though the video is Sydney’s only one, it’s already been viewed 1.8 million times since she posted it three days ago.

Hundreds of thousands of people have liked it, with many leaving her supporting comments. 

‘Guys always thinking they can pull a fast one on us,’ wrote one.

‘Don’t know why he’s got the sunnies on, he’s not that bright,’ said another,