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California Headline USA Los Angeles

Photographer who spent TEN YEARS on LA’s notorious homeless hotspot reveals his work 

A photographer who spent a decade on Los Angeles’ notorious homeless hotspot Skid Row has revealed his work.

The poverty-stricken conditions faced daily by the almost 5,000 residents of the downtown area of Los Angeles are shown in the series of gritty black and white photos.

Photographer Suitcase Joe spent ten years getting to know and photographing the homeless people who live in tents that line the area in downtown Los Angeles, and he has now released a book entitled ‘Sidewalk Champions’.

Over the years Joe gained trust and formed friendships within the homeless community, the largest in America, allowing him unprecedented access to document their daily lives.

Some of the images are challenging, depicting the drug use and poverty rife in Skid Row that is unimaginable to many people.

A series of photographs taken on Los Angeles’ ‘Skid Row’ – where the city’s largest community of homeless people are based – have been released by street photographer Suitcase Joe in a new book. Pictured: A group of homeless people on Skid Row, one of whom is seen inside a tent on the sidewalk, another receives a hair cut, as a woman walks down the street

Bruce, left, pushes his friend as they go for a stroll whilst Pepper, right, holds his cat Justice as they come together to pose for a family style photo

A man known as Mel poses for the camera while shirtless on Skid Row

Right: Bruce, left, pushes his friend as they go for a stroll whilst Pepper, right, holds his cat Justice as they come together to pose for a family style photo. Left: A man known as Mel poses for the camera while shirtless on Skid Row

Pictured: A man named Crushow cleans the floor as his dog Ugly hangs around nearby on Skid Row

Pictured: A man named Crushow cleans the floor as his dog Ugly hangs around nearby on Skid Row

Newly-weds Row and Kricket kissing each other. The pair met on Skid Row, and say how wonderful it is to have found someone who they can trust and love among the community

Newly-weds Row and Kricket kissing each other. The pair met on Skid Row, and say how wonderful it is to have found someone who they can trust and love among the community

However, there are also heart-warming snapshots amongst the collection, such as newly-weds Row and Kricket kissing each other. The pair met on Skid Row, and say how wonderful it is to have found someone who they can trust and love.

A well-known Skid Row character is a man named Jerry who has a serious facial disfigurement after surviving a shooting at a bus stop. Despite his terrible injury, Jerry was often photographed smiling and laughing however he sadly passed away in December 2020.

Other pictures show Chelsea, in high heels holding a huge pellet gun. She bought it to defend her tent – from rats. Typhus is an issue on Skid Row, that is carried by the fleas that live on the unwanted rodents.

A man cooks chicken outside tends using a makeshift kitchen, including a metal drum and a metal grill used as a barbecue. He used a table knife and fork to cook the food on the makeshift grill

A man cooks chicken outside tends using a makeshift kitchen, including a metal drum and a metal grill used as a barbecue. He used a table knife and fork to cook the food on the makeshift grill

Pictured: A man with only one eye poses for the camera on Skid Row. Skid Row is the location of one of the largest stable populations of homeless people in the U.S. with over 5,000 inhabitants, 3,000 of which sleep in tents or on the sidewalk

Pictured: A man with only one eye poses for the camera on Skid Row. Skid Row is the location of one of the largest stable populations of homeless people in the U.S. with over 5,000 inhabitants, 3,000 of which sleep in tents or on the sidewalk

Stephanie, who found an unexploded mortar outside her tent one morning in Skid Row, she picked it up but the fuse went off exploding in her hand

Chelsea, in high heels holding a huge pellet gun. She bought it to defend her tent - from rats. Typhus is an issue on Skid Row, that is carried by the fleas that live on the unwanted rodents

Left: Stephanie, who found an unexploded mortar outside her tent one morning in Skid Row, she picked it up but the fuse went off exploding in her hand. Right: Chelsea, in high heels holding a huge pellet gun. She bought it to defend her tent – from rats. Typhus is an issue on Skid Row, that is carried by the fleas that live on the unwanted rodents

One Skid Row resident heats up pasta using a bin with some fire wood inside it to boil water, in another makeshift kitchen

One Skid Row resident heats up pasta using a bin with some fire wood inside it to boil water, in another makeshift kitchen

Another picture shows Stephanie, who found an unexploded mortar outside her tent one morning, she picked it up but the fuse went off exploding in her hand. She lost her thumb and index finger, and now struggles to take care of the injury because of not having access to clean bandages and iodine.

Suitcase Joe is an activist and advocate for the rights of all unhoused individuals. He co-founded the Suitcase Joe Foundation to serve the people of Skid Row with day to day needs and to provide support services for getting into long term housing.

Skid Row is the location of one of the largest stable populations of homeless people in the U.S. with over 5,000 inhabitants, 3,000 of which sleep in tents or on the sidewalk. 

Proceeds from the sale of ‘Sidewalk Champions’ will help support the Suitcase Joe Foundation and directly aid unhoused residents of Skid Row.  

Jenny looks out from her tent that is located in Skid Row

A resident of Skid Row gives a wry smile as he sits for his portrait.

Left: Jenny looks out from her tent on Skid Row. Right: A resident of Skid Row gives a wry smile as he sits for his portrait

Pictured: A needle being injected into the neck of one of the residents in Skid Row. Some of the images are challenging, depicting the drug use and poverty rife in Skid Row that is unimaginable to many people

Pictured: A needle being injected into the neck of one of the residents in Skid Row. Some of the images are challenging, depicting the drug use and poverty rife in Skid Row that is unimaginable to many people

Cricket takes a bath in a metal bin that he heated up with a propane stove beneath the tub and added some essential oils into that he found that had been discarded from a nearby shop

Jerry, who has a serious facial disfigurement after surviving a shooting at a bus stop. Despite his terrible injury, Jerry was often photographed smiling and laughing however he sadly passed away in December 2020

Left: Cricket takes a bath in a metal bin that he heated up with a propane stove beneath the tub and added some essential oils into that he found that had been discarded from a nearby shop. Right: Jerry who has a serious facial disfigurement after surviving a shooting at a bus stop. Despite his terrible injury, Jerry was often photographed smiling and laughing however he sadly passed away in December 2020

Graffiti on the road says 'F*** the Police', making it clear the neighbourhood's attitude towards authority

Graffiti on the road says ‘F*** the Police’, making it clear the neighbourhood’s attitude towards authority

The book has been released amid reports that Los Angeles’ homeless communities are being ‘overwhelmed’ by Covid-19, with dozens of people living in Skid Row’s homeless shelters being diagnosed with the disease.

A tent at the Union Rescue Mission, a charity working to help the area’s homeless, became an triage center in response to a sudden surge in the spread of the disease through the shelter system.

Earlier estimates predicted devastating outbreaks in homeless shelters in the California city. While infections among the homeless have lagged behind the county’s per capita rate, the December surge has seen a spike in the number of cases in homeless people as well.

Fall saw an average of around 60 new cases each week, but infections among homeless people doubled the week after Thanksgiving. The Department of Public Health’s final report of 2020 showed 547 new cases in the previous week.

‘The unexplainable protection that people who are homeless have had from COVID is disappearing,’ Rev. Andrew J. Bales, chief executive of the Union Rescue Mission, said to the Los Angeles Times. ‘All of skid row and many agencies/missions are hot spots. All are overwhelmed.’  

Boxer, poses for a portrait on Skid Row. He's an addict who had recently taken a bad batch of drugs

A disturbing scene showing a naked man sprawled on a rainy street in Skid Row.

Left: Boxer, poses for a portrait on Skid Row. He’s an addict who had recently taken a bad batch of drugs. Right: A disturbing scene showing a naked man sprawled on a rainy street in Skid Row

A Skid Row resident gets a haircut from a fellow resident on the sidewalk on Skid Row in Los Angeles

A Skid Row resident gets a haircut from a fellow resident on the sidewalk on Skid Row in Los Angeles

Pictured: A woman washes herself inside her tent on Skid Row. Without proper hygiene facilities, there have been fears that the coronavirus will spread quickly through the community

Pictured: A woman washes herself inside her tent on Skid Row. Without proper hygiene facilities, there have been fears that the coronavirus will spread quickly through the community

Graffiti and litter is strewn around a street in Skid Row. Covering fifty city blocks (2.71 sq mi) immediately east of downtown Los Angeles, Skid Row is bordered by Third Street to the north, Seventh Street to the south, Alameda Street to the east, and Main Street to the west

Graffiti and litter is strewn around a street in Skid Row. Covering fifty city blocks (2.71 sq mi) immediately east of downtown Los Angeles, Skid Row is bordered by Third Street to the north, Seventh Street to the south, Alameda Street to the east, and Main Street to the west

California’s COVID-19 surge is showing signs of leveling off after besieging hospitals, emergency services and morgues for weeks, the state’s top health official said on Tuesday, as medical staffing continued to buckle under the strain.

The number of newly hospitalized coronavirus patients statewide has declined to 2,500 admissions every 24 hours over the past two days, down from 3,500 in previous days, California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr Mark Ghaly said in an online briefing with reporters.

Ghaly called it ‘the biggest signal to me that things are beginning to flatten and potentially improve.’

He cited several other promising trends, including a slowdown in confirmed daily case numbers – 36,487 reported Tuesday, down from a weekly average of 42,000 cases a day – and a leveling off in the rate of diagnostic tests coming back positive. Moreover, a 5% uptick in COVID patients in hospitals over the past 14 days marked the lowest rate of increase in more than two months, Ghaly said.

But he acknowledged that health officials were ‘absolutely’ worried about the spread of a more infectious variant of the coronavirus that emerged in Britain and has shown up in the United States and other countries. 

A person with a duvet thrown over them walks the streets of Skid Row. Suitcase Joe is an activist and advocate for the rights of all unhoused individuals. He co-founded the Suitcase Joe Foundation to serve the people of Skid Row with day to day needs and to provide support services for getting into long term housing

A person with a duvet thrown over them walks the streets of Skid Row. Suitcase Joe is an activist and advocate for the rights of all unhoused individuals. He co-founded the Suitcase Joe Foundation to serve the people of Skid Row with day to day needs and to provide support services for getting into long term housing

A resident of Skid Row injects a needle into her arm. Drug abuse is a prevalent issue among the residents of the area

A resident of Skid Row injects a needle into her arm. Drug abuse is a prevalent issue among the residents of the area

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Headline USA

Photographer captures the final moments of a doomed rat

Take RAT! Moment Red Squirrel kills helpless rodent after face-off on tree branch when it dared to intrude on its territory

  • These are the last moments of a rat who died following a fight with a red squirrel in Blairgowrie, Perthshire
  • Amateur wildlife photographer Jock Elliott had planned to spend the day documenting Red Squirrels 
  • The Red Squirrel is an endangered species throughout much of Britain

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Dramatic photos show the final moments of a young rat which dared to traipse on a red squirrel’s territory.

The scenes unfolded on the branch of a tree when the two rodents faced off in Blairgowrie, Perthshire.

The images were captured by an amateur wildlife photographer who witnessed the one-sided tussle as the rat – believed to be a year old  – was killed in the fight.

Grandfather-of-one Jock Elliott, 72, said the squirrel attacked the rodent when it got to close and fell to the ground after it was bitten.

He said: ‘The squirrel took umbrage at the rat following him up.

‘The squirrel had looked at it a few times and kept brushing him off, then it got too close and then it turned round and let it have it.

‘It only lasted around ten seconds.’ 

These are the final moments of a small rat who was killed after climbing on a branch in Blairgowire, Perthshire

The rat came face to face with a red squirrel on the branch who refused to yield its position on top of the branch

The rat came face to face with a red squirrel on the branch who refused to yield its position on top of the branch 

Jock Elliott, 72, was planning to spend his afternoon taking photographs of red squirrels when he witnessed the drama

Jock Elliott, 72, was planning to spend his afternoon taking photographs of red squirrels when he witnessed the drama 

He said the rat fell about five feet off the branch to the ground.

‘It looked quite young, less than a year old I’d have thought,’ he added. ‘He wasn’t a happy chappy, the rat got a wee bit too close.’

Mr Elliott, an amateur wildlife photographer  from Brechin, Angus, had expected a quiet day photographing red squirrels.

He added: ‘I’ve been there many times before but never seen anything like that before.’

The rat was unable to fend off the much larger rodent in this battle of life and death on top of the branch of a tree

The rat was unable to fend off the much larger rodent in this battle of life and death on top of the branch of a tree

Within a few seconds of battle commencing, the rat is dangling over the edge of its branch before it falls to the ground

Within a few seconds of battle commencing, the rat is dangling over the edge of its branch before it falls to the ground

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Technology UK

Stunning auroras captured in Northern Lights Photographer of the Year Contest



Travel photography blog Capture the Atlas has revealed the top photos from its Northern Lights Photographer of the Year Competition

It’s something that features on many people’s bucket lists, and if you’ve always dreamed of seeing The Northern Lights, then new photos are likely to be right up your street.

Travel photography blog Capture the Atlas has revealed the top photos from its Northern Lights Photographer of the Year Competition.

Dan Zafra, editor of Capture the Atlas, explained: “This compilation is always published in December to coincide with the Northern Lights season and the end of year, and it is aimed at inspiring and sharing the beauty of this natural phenomenon.”

This year’s list includes photos of the Northern Lights taken around the world, including from the US, Russia, Finland, Norway, Iceland, Australia, Canada and Antarctica.

The Northern Lights form as a results of incoming energy and particles from the sun.

NASA explained: “Auroras are one effect of such energetic particles, which can speed out from the sun both in a steady stream called the solar wind and due to giant eruptions known as coronal mass ejections or CMEs.

“After a trip toward Earth that can last two to three days, the solar particles and magnetic fields cause the release of particles already trapped near Earth, which in turn trigger reactions in the upper atmosphere in which oxygen and nitrogen molecules release photons of light.

“The result: the Northern and Southern lights.”

Have you always dreamed of seeing the Northern Lights? Here’s our guide on where to see them in the UK.





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Chicago Headline USA

Photographer captures stunning images of the Aurora Borealis from SPACE

The city of Fairbanks in Alaska is deemed the best place to see the stunning Northern Lights, but one photographer took it to the next level by observing the show from space.

Nate Luebbe attached a camera to a weather balloon and launched it into the stratosphere, allowing him to snap images of the greenish and pinkish lights shining over the Earth.

‘Most people who want to see the Northern Lights fly to Fairbanks, or Iceland etc, and usually end up seeing them for the first time on the plane ride over, Luebbe told DailyMail.com in an email.

‘Seeing them from very high in the air is an extremely unique perspective, and I wanted to take that experience and push it to the extremes.’

The 10-foot balloon traveled for about two hours before reaching its maximum altitude of 122,600 feet before popping.

The Sony camera, which was housed in a protective box, fell safely to the Earth after balloon deflated and Luebbe and his team retrieved by a helicopter the next day. 

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Nate Luebbe attached a camera to a weather balloon and launched it into the stratosphere, allowing him to snap images of the greenish and pinkish lights shining over the Earth

‘I’m very fortunate in my career to have gotten to see the things I have, Luebbe said during his 29-minute documentary film ‘Light Side Up.’

‘I’ve had sunrises at Machu Picchu, I’ve been 20 feet from a wild polar bear and hands down, the Aurora Borealis is the single most beautiful natural phenomenon.’

‘There’s nothing I would rather photograph.’

Luebbe told DailyMail.com that he had reached out to Sony about its upcoming a7S III camera, which was specifically designed for low-light photos and would be ideal for his project.

The footage of the Aurora Borealis was captured from 126,000 feet above the surface over the city of Fairbanks in Alaska

The footage of the Aurora Borealis was captured from 126,000 feet above the surface over the city of Fairbanks in Alaska

Nate Lubbe (pictured) braved the freezing cold in Alaska to capture the footage, as well as make a documentary about the project called 'Lights Side Up'

Nate Lubbe (pictured) braved the freezing cold in Alaska to capture the footage, as well as make a documentary about the project called ‘Lights Side Up’ 

‘When they confirmed that we could borrow a few pre-production models we knew it was go-time!,’ he said.

‘It was a tough sell to convince Sony to loan us a top-secret camera that wasn’t even publicly available, especially being honest that we weren’t 100 percent sure we would ever send them back, but thankfully they trusted me.’

However, the project did not start off with a bang.

The team’s initial flight took off successfully, but when Luebbe and his colleagues searched for the box in a helicopter they came up empty handed – they spent three and half hours looking for the camera.

The unsuccessful attempt was due to an unforeseen cold front caused the balloon to stop ascending and float sideways for multiple hours at which point the GPS systems failed. 

‘We were essentially trying to find a single Styrofoam cooler lost in an ear four and a half times the size of Chicago,’ Luebbe explains about recovering the box. 

However, the failed attempt did not deter them from giving it a second shot.

The Sony a7S III camera was placed in a Styrofoam cooler, along with a GPS system, batteries and heating pockets to keep the technologies operational in the cold

The Sony a7S III camera was placed in a Styrofoam cooler, along with a GPS system, batteries and heating pockets to keep the technologies operational in the cold 

The team's initial flight took off successfully, but when Luebbe and his colleagues searched for the box in a helicopter they came up empty handed – they spent three and half hours looking for the camera. However, they gave it another go (pictured)

The team’s initial flight took off successfully, but when Luebbe and his colleagues searched for the box in a helicopter they came up empty handed – they spent three and half hours looking for the camera. However, they gave it another go (pictured) 

The crew headed back to the city of Fairbanks after hearing of an incoming G1 class aurora storm and repeated the same processes.

They again packed a payload  with a Sony a7s III camera, a GPS system, extra batteries, but this time more heating pockets were added with the hopes of keeping the tracker operational in the frigid temperatures. 

The payload ascended for just shy of 2 hours and at 122,600 feet the balloon burst, sending the payload back to Earth.

The payload ascended for just shy of 2 hours and at 122,600 feet the balloon burst, sending the payload back to Earth. The next day, the team loaded back into the helicopter to retrieve the payload – and this time they found it at the bottom of a mountain

The payload ascended for just shy of 2 hours and at 122,600 feet the balloon burst, sending the payload back to Earth. The next day, the team loaded back into the helicopter to retrieve the payload – and this time they found it at the bottom of a mountain

The next day, the team loaded back into the helicopter to retrieve the payload – and this time they found it at the bottom of a mountain. 

‘I think one of the most exciting moments was after the flight when we flew out in a helicopter to recover the payload,’ said Luebbe.

‘I’ll never forget that feeling of seeing the parachute on the ground and knowing that meant that we had succeeded. 

‘We couldn’t even wait to get back to our hotel to watch the footage, so we pulled over at the closest restaurant, ripped the camera out of the box and watched the entire 2 hour flight right there at the table!’

WHAT ARE AURORAS AND WHAT TRIGGERS THE STUNNING NATURAL DISPLAYS?

The Northern and Southern Lights are natural light spectacles triggered in our atmosphere that are also known as the ‘Auroras’.

There are two types of Aurora – Aurora Borealis, which means ‘dawn of the north’, and Aurora Australis, ‘dawn of the south.’

The displays light up when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere. 

There are two types of Aurora - Aurora Borealis (file photo), which means 'dawn of the north', and Aurora Australis, 'dawn of the south.' The displays light up when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere

There are two types of Aurora – Aurora Borealis (file photo), which means ‘dawn of the north’, and Aurora Australis, ‘dawn of the south.’ The displays light up when electrically charged particles from the sun enter the Earth’s atmosphere

Usually the particles, sometimes referred to as a solar storm, are deflected by Earth’s magnetic field.

But during stronger storms they enter the atmosphere and collide with gas particles, including hydrogen and helium.

These collisions emit light. Auroral displays appear in many colours although pale green and pink are common.

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Headline USA

Photographer and model are arrested for doing “daring” session in Egyptian pyramids | The State

Several international media have reported on the arrest by the Cairo police in Egypt of a photographer and a model, after performing una photoshoot that has been described as “daring” near the pyramid of Djoser, which is part of the Saqqara necropolis.

The photographer, whose name has not been revealed, went to that place with the model and dancer Salma al-Shimi, who shared on Instagram some photos of said work, where he is seen wearing a short white dress, somewhat low-cut, alluding to those used by the ancient pharaohs.

According to local media, both were taken before a court and the authorities also questioned employees of the place, which was originally a cemetery, to find out who allowed them to carry out the photo shoot.

According to information from AFP, in recent months, different courts in that country have sent to different prisons about 12 people who uploaded content made in that country and that has been classified as “offensive” to their social networks.

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Headlines UK

Celebrated punk rock photographer David GODLIS releases trove images depicting NYC during 1970s


David Godlis, (better known as GODLIS), made his mark documenting punk rock legends as the unofficial- official photographer of CBGB during the 1970s. Patti Smith, The Ramones, Richard Hell, The Sex Pistols, Blondie and The Talking Heads – just to name a few – all ended up in front of his curious lens.   

Countless performers actualized within the very small sweaty venue and Godlis was there to immortalize those fleeting moments with grainy black and white snaps of punk rock’s playground at night.

But during the day, Godlis was elsewhere; trolling the streets of New York City while snapping pictures of its outsize dwellers – both eccentric and mundane – as the city backdrop evolved from grit to glamour during the 1970s and 80s.

Two old ladies dressed in Sunday’s-best pass a lurid x-rated movie poster, a polyester- suit- wearing gigolo advertises his services in the park, there are midnight diner patrons, commuters, business men getting their shoes shined, bored shopkeepers, wise guys, nuns, stoop dwellers, hot dog stands and, inexplicably, a man wearing a balaclava through Times Square.   

Now the celebrated photographer is set to release a trove of these images in a forthcoming book titled, Godlis Streets. It features 200 photographs that serve as a celebration of New York City and a time-capsule to another era.  

The above photo depicting a well-dressed woman watching the NYC St Patrick’s Day Parade as she perfectly matched the 3D display of sunglasses behind her is one of 200 images featured in Godlis Streets. David Godlis is most notable for photographing punk-rock legends like The Ramones, Sex Pistols and Blondie who performed at CBGB during the 1970s and 1980s

Godlis says 'things seem to find him' and that part of the challenge in street photography is that he never knows what he will encounter. 'I'm not even going out and looking for them because who would know what to look for?' he told DailyMail.com. He points to the above photograph as an example: 'All I saw at the time was a man holding hands with two girls and I clicked,' he said. 'The fascinating thing for me about that picture was when I developed it and looked at how many things resonated after the fact like The Silent Partner sign with this guy holding two girls. The Deer Hunter with this guy in his bird shirt'

Godlis says ‘things seem to find him’ and that part of the challenge in street photography is that he never knows what he will encounter. ‘I’m not even going out and looking for them because who would know what to look for?’ he told DailyMail.com. He points to the above photograph as an example: ‘All I saw at the time was a man holding hands with two girls and I clicked,’ he said. ‘The fascinating thing for me about that picture was when I developed it and looked at how many things resonated after the fact like The Silent Partner sign with this guy holding two girls. The Deer Hunter with this guy in his bird shirt’

Originally from Manhattan, David Godlis was an English major at Boston University when he fell in love with the work of Diane Arbus after seeing her retrospective at the MoMA in 1972. He immediately enrolled in an experimental photography school where his classmates were Nan Goldin and Stanley Greene. After completing, he moved back to New York City to pursue a career as a street photographer

Originally from Manhattan, David Godlis was an English major at Boston University when he fell in love with the work of Diane Arbus after seeing her retrospective at the MoMA in 1972. He immediately enrolled in an experimental photography school where his classmates were Nan Goldin and Stanley Greene. After completing, he moved back to New York City to pursue a career as a street photographer

Juxtaposition is a huge element in Godlis's work, an example is this photograph of a nun walking in front of a naughty advertisement. Words are another common theme in his pictures, whether they're written on advertisements, signs or graffiti, he always tries to incorporate them in his pictures, 'If I let my instincts carry me, those things are working in the background and in the foreground'

Juxtaposition is a huge element in Godlis’s work, an example is this photograph of a nun walking in front of a naughty advertisement. Words are another common theme in his pictures, whether they’re written on advertisements, signs or graffiti, he always tries to incorporate them in his pictures, ‘If I let my instincts carry me, those things are working in the background and in the foreground’

David Godlis was an English major at Boston University when attended Diane Arbus’ retrospective at the MoMA in 1972. Her seminal work depicting everyday ‘freaks’ on the street had a profound impact on Godlis, who immediately enrolled in an experimental photography school, where his classmates were Nan Goldin and Stanley Greene. 

From that point on, taking pictures became his raison d’etre. ‘It’s almost like a drug for me,’ he told DailyMail.com.

Mesmerized by the greats like Robert Frank, Brassai, Diane Arbus, Garry Winogrand, Lee Friedlander and Weegee – Godlis made it his goal to perfect the art of street photography and photograph the world around him, exactly as he sees it. 

He describes street photography as an art form that ‘stops time and puts a frame around it.’ He says, the challenge is trying to create something that looks just as interesting in two-dimension as it does in three-dimension.  

 In that case, what better place for a budding street photographer to be than New York City? With its buzzing overcrowded sidewalks teaming with ethnic diversity, street vendors, performers, punks, preachers, artists, children, working girls, bankers, blue bloods, bohemians, homeless, housewives, drunks, drug addicts and tourists. 

‘All the great photographs I had originally seen of street photographers were from New York. And I couldn’t understand when I was in Boston, why my pictures didn’t look like that. That’s when I knew I had to be in New York, it’s the capitol of street photography.’

And, as cultural critic, Luc Sante, writes in the foreword: ‘Since we are in the 1970s and ’80s’ there is also ‘a great deal of smoking, as well as porn, and wigs, and phone booths, and hand-lettered signage, and ledges that people can sit on unencumbered by anti-homeless devices.’  

A man advertises his sexual services in a Boston park, 1974. Godlis attended school at Boston University before he fell in love with photography and moved back to New York City. His forthcoming book features a foreword written by Luc Sante who noted that very few of Godlis's subjects put on a show for the camera, but 'among those who do are the Southie wise guys he photographed in Boston...They¿ve got the trichoperms and the double breasted car coats and they stand around ominously, making believe they¿re not just loitering the way they have since they were kids'

A man advertises his sexual services in a Boston park, 1974. Godlis attended school at Boston University before he fell in love with photography and moved back to New York City. His forthcoming book features a foreword written by Luc Sante who noted that very few of Godlis’s subjects put on a show for the camera, but ‘among those who do are the Southie wise guys he photographed in Boston…They’ve got the trichoperms and the double breasted car coats and they stand around ominously, making believe they’re not just loitering the way they have since they were kids’

'I'm fascinated by Hasids,' said Godlis. 'They look great in black and white. I buy my cameras from stores that they run so they can't turn me down for taking their picture.' Though most of the time, he said people never realize that they've been photographed. It's a strategy he's honed over the years: 'I can be standing right in front of someone and take their picture and they will have no idea'

‘I’m fascinated by Hasids,’ said Godlis. ‘They look great in black and white. I buy my cameras from stores that they run so they can’t turn me down for taking their picture.’ Though most of the time, he said people never realize that they’ve been photographed. It’s a strategy he’s honed over the years: ‘I can be standing right in front of someone and take their picture and they will have no idea’

Godlis said this image taken from art bins in Times Square in 1980 is his favorite photograph in the book. He said it represents 'the essence of the kind of picture I like to take. I always want it to be just on the edge of unacceptable. While not his intention, Godlis's cache of photographs inadvertently tell a story about American society

Godlis said this image taken from art bins in Times Square in 1980 is his favorite photograph in the book. He said it represents ‘the essence of the kind of picture I like to take. I always want it to be just on the edge of unacceptable. While not his intention, Godlis’s cache of photographs inadvertently tell a story about American society

'There are a lot of old ladies in this book,' said Godlis. 'A lot of them looked like the old ladies that lived on my floor when I first moved in, and now I'm the old guy in the building.' Godlis still lives in the same apartment on St Mark¿s Place that was previously occupied by the radical, political activist Abbie Hoffman (before he went in hiding)

‘There are a lot of old ladies in this book,’ said Godlis. ‘A lot of them looked like the old ladies that lived on my floor when I first moved in, and now I’m the old guy in the building.’ Godlis still lives in the same apartment on St Mark’s Place that was previously occupied by the radical, political activist Abbie Hoffman (before he went in hiding)

Though most notable for capturing candids of the CBGB scene after dark, it’s street photography that Godlis says was his first love and true passion. 

‘I’m not really a punk-rock photographer, I never wanted to be Annie Leibovitz.’ 

Unlike fashion or commercial photography, Godlis’s aim is to capture the transient micro-stories of everyday people that pass him on the street. Blink, and you’ll miss them. ‘It’s like capturing something out of thin air,’ he said. So Godlis works on instincts and hopes for the best. 

That being said, a good photograph is rare. Godlis says that five rolls of 36 exposures may only bare one good image. Two is ‘like winning the lottery.’ 

Of course, digital photography has changed all that, making the stakes less high with memory cards that can hold an infinite amount of outtakes.

The challenge is one of the elements that drew him to street photography in the first place. ‘Your senses are very fine tuned, but you’re not really sure which of those things you’re taking pictures of that are going to end up being the thing that’s really interesting.’

As an example, Godlis talks about a photograph taken of a man walking through Times Square while holding the hands of two women under two movie marquis for the 1978 films: The Silent Partner and The Deer Hunter. ‘All I saw at the time was a man holding hands with two girls and I clicked,’ he said. ‘The fascinating thing for me about that picture was when I developed it and looked at how many things resonated after the fact like The Silent Partner sign with this guy holding two girls. The Deer Hunter sign with this guy in his bird shirt’   

‘You can look at that picture and give me credit for putting all that in, but that happens in such an instinctual way,’ he tells DailyMail.com. ‘The amount of things my camera captured, I don’t remember comprehending at the time I shot him.’  

Two conservatively dressed women pass by X-rated advertisements in Times Square. Chris Stein, co-founder and guitarist of Blondie writes in his afterword: 'It¿s like these moments are posed but in a way they¿re too good and succinct to be staged. It¿s just the heightened reality that¿s all around us all the time but that usually remains unobserved'

Two conservatively dressed women pass by X-rated advertisements in Times Square. Chris Stein, co-founder and guitarist of Blondie writes in his afterword: ‘It’s like these moments are posed but in a way they’re too good and succinct to be staged. It’s just the heightened reality that’s all around us all the time but that usually remains unobserved’

Godlis's photographs depict New York City on the brink of transition from gritty to glamorous. In the foreword written by Luc Sante, who says 'Since we are in the 1970s and ¿80s there is a great deal of smoking, as well as porn, and wigs, and phone booths, and hand-lettered signage, and ledges that people can sit on unencumbered by anti-homeless devices'

Godlis’s photographs depict New York City on the brink of transition from gritty to glamorous. In the foreword written by Luc Sante, who says ‘Since we are in the 1970s and ’80s there is a great deal of smoking, as well as porn, and wigs, and phone booths, and hand-lettered signage, and ledges that people can sit on unencumbered by anti-homeless devices’

Though not intentional, often the advertisements and posters in the framing in the Godlis images provide a time stamp of the era. The above image depicts a man dressed as Uncle Sam while campaigning for Ronald Reagan in 1980, the sign written in Spanish translates to: 'If you want peace, prepare for war'

Though not intentional, often the advertisements and posters in the framing in the Godlis images provide a time stamp of the era. The above image depicts a man dressed as Uncle Sam while campaigning for Ronald Reagan in 1980, the sign written in Spanish translates to: ‘If you want peace, prepare for war’

Godlis attempts to preserve moments in a city that is constantly moving forward. Even his subjects are often pictured in motion. He said the city is different now 'because of the new corporate nature if New York City. It's a lot more cleaned up that it was back then.' He said: 'When I was walking around in the seventies, I was photographing stuff left over from the forties, fifties and sixties. And by the time the eighties happened, big money came back into New York again'

Godlis attempts to preserve moments in a city that is constantly moving forward. Even his subjects are often pictured in motion. He said the city is different now ‘because of the new corporate nature if New York City. It’s a lot more cleaned up that it was back then.’ He said: ‘When I was walking around in the seventies, I was photographing stuff left over from the forties, fifties and sixties. And by the time the eighties happened, big money came back into New York again’

'Street photography,' Godlis says, 'is making something out of nothing.' He doesn't remember taking this curious photo, nor does he know the backstory behind it. But as Luc Sante said it points to a time one could walk through 'Times Square wearing a balaclava without getting shot by a SWAT team'

‘Street photography,’ Godlis says, ‘is making something out of nothing.’ He doesn’t remember taking this curious photo, nor does he know the backstory behind it. But as Luc Sante said it points to a time one could walk through ‘Times Square wearing a balaclava without getting shot by a SWAT team’

Godlis doesn’t go out hunting for the perfect picture; instead he lets the world come to him. 

Despite this rather lackadaisical approach, he has a knack for being in the right place, at the right time. Take for instance, the photograph of a woman sitting with two children at a museum, while staring at a painting of a woman sitting with two children. 

There is also a picture of two nuns hurriedly walking past an (unaffiliated) street evangelist holding up a placard that screams: ‘Jesus Says Search The Scriptures.’

Godlis Streets, published by Reel Art Press is the first ever book dedicated to David Godlis's images taken on the streets of New York City during 1970s and 1980s. 'That's the thing about New York, there's a lot of strange people who come out of their apartments and walk around and that's why I love taking street pictures'

Godlis Streets, published by Reel Art Press is the first ever book dedicated to David Godlis’s images taken on the streets of New York City during 1970s and 1980s. ‘That’s the thing about New York, there’s a lot of strange people who come out of their apartments and walk around and that’s why I love taking street pictures’

Another image depicts a smartly dressed business man in a fedora, who is reading a tabloid headline that shouts GET OFF MY BACK, as he himself is backed against a corporate wall. 

‘These things seem to find me. It’s not I’m going out and looking for them because I wouldn’t know what to look for,’ he said. ‘And I revel in that.’  

Luc Sante explains that Godlis’s pictures show people ‘uneasily enacting half-forgotten rituals, wearing vestigial dress-up clothes and timidly asserting spatial autonomy, in a city that seems to have been erected and abandoned by another, larger species.’ 

As far as subject matter goes for a street photographer; the Big Apple is the gift that keeps on giving: ‘That’s the thing about New York, there’s a lot of strange people who come out of their apartments and walk around. If you’re not a photographer, you can just sit at a cafe and watch people walk by all day long.’  

He adds: ‘I think it’s an interesting city to photograph because it’s very black and white. It’s the way the streets are laid out, there’s no curves, everything is straight, everything is in a grid. And it’s one of the only places where people aren’t in cars, they’re all on the street.’ 

Godlis acknowledges that the city has drastically changed since the 1970s, but he doesn’t spend time contemplating which version is better. 

‘It’s a little bit different now because of the new corporate nature if New York City. It’s a lot more cleaned up that it was back then,’ he says. ‘When I was walking around in the seventies, I was photographing stuff left over from the forties, fifties and sixties. And by the time the eighties happened, big money came back into New York again.’

‘But,’ he says, ‘The concrete is always the same when you look down. Maybe it’s just a different building over here and over there.’

He touches upon a fascinating element in all his pictures, ‘Maybe it was a ripe era that I walked into in the seventies, because – you know – something was ending and something hadn’t yet begun.’   

Above, Fenway Stadium in 1974. 'All the great photographs I had originally seen of street photographers were from New York. And I couldn't understand when I was in Boston, why my pictures didn't look like that. That's when I knew I had to be in New York, it's the capitol of street photography'

Above, Fenway Stadium in 1974. ‘All the great photographs I had originally seen of street photographers were from New York. And I couldn’t understand when I was in Boston, why my pictures didn’t look like that. That’s when I knew I had to be in New York, it’s the capitol of street photography’

This photograph was taken at the (no longer existent) flea markets around Astor Place in the 1980s. 'It was kind of like an unorganized spontaneous flea market every day. And so that guy was probably relaxing in his bin full of extra stuff.' he said. 'I didn't wake him, I just took the picture and moved on'

This photograph was taken at the (no longer existent) flea markets around Astor Place in the 1980s. ‘It was kind of like an unorganized spontaneous flea market every day. And so that guy was probably relaxing in his bin full of extra stuff.’ he said. ‘I didn’t wake him, I just took the picture and moved on’

A business man gets his shoes shined while reading the New York Post story about Ginger Meadows, a 24-year-old model who was killed by a giant crocodile in 1987

A business man gets his shoes shined while reading the New York Post story about Ginger Meadows, a 24-year-old model who was killed by a giant crocodile in 1987

'People are always changing the way they look from one decade to the next,' now Godlis says, 'everyone is always holding a cell phone which can ruin a picture'

‘People are always changing the way they look from one decade to the next,’ now Godlis says, ‘everyone is always holding a cell phone which can ruin a picture’

Godlis doesn’t play around with angles or special lenses. He says, ‘You can make something look really cool if you’re doing an album cover, but I don’t like my pictures to be distorted –  I want you to feel like you’re out on the street and just saw a slice of time.’

He explains that the beauty in Diane Arbus’s photography is that ‘she made something strange look very normal.’

‘Diane Arbus didn’t have to shoot distorted pictures of midgets, all she had to do is shoot pictures of midgets, almost like they were ID shots just straight on without having to emphasize that you’re looking at something strange.’  

Godlis never knows what to expect from a roll of film until he develops it. In fact, more often than not, the pictures he was most excited about in the moment, don’t make the final cut. ‘It’s always a surprise what ends up being perfect,’ he said. 

‘Sometimes I would go out shooting and come back telling people the story of how I grabbed this great picture; and by the time I developed the film and made a proof sheet, the picture wasn’t enough, it just wasn’t as good as the story.’

In that way, editing can be a challenge for Godlis, who says he must be very disciplined in ruling out images that ‘are very good, but still not perfect.’ It’s critical that he extricates himself from the fond emotional memory in snapping the photograph when making his final decision. ‘You gotta be disciplined when you’re shooting and then you gotta be disciplined when you edit,’ he tells DailyMail.com.

That being said, Godlis feels like Instagram has been fantastic in helping him curate photographs for publication.

Already well known for his punk-rock pictures, public interest in his street photography began in 2019 after Godlis started posting snaps from his enormous cache of images taken during the 1970s and 80s.  

‘As I started doing that, I realized that I was kind-of live editing with the help of people telling me which pictures they liked in through emojis and comments and things.’ 

He didn’t have that option back in the 1970s. Instead he took a class with the celebrated street snapper, Garry Winogrand who helped him differentiate between a good picture from a great one. ‘I just had a lot of pictures and I wanted to know what was good or not. I had no way of knowing otherwise,’ he told DailyMail.com. Godlis presented him with 50 images and Winogrand whittled it down to two. 

The result of this meticulous curation process is Godlis Streets – the first ever book dedicated to the celebrated image maker’s snaps taken during the 1970s and ’80s.  

The book offers a window to another era. His work reflects the shifting world around him through the lives of complete strangers. That story is told through thousands of fleeting, half-second moments made permanent with the click of a shutter and rolls of light-sensitive cellulose acetate. 

‘When things change, they change for a reason. You have to accept what it is and work around it. If New York is different from before, then photograph the way it’s different.’ 

‘You can’t stop progress,’ he says. Having spent his entire life stopping time at 1/100 of a second – this is something Godlis knows all too well.  

A man deep in thought is snapped reading the newspaper. Unlike fashion or commercial photography, Godlis's aim is to capture the transient micro-stories of everyday people - however mundane or exciting that may be,  which is why he says street photography is mostly 'making something out of nothing'

A man deep in thought is snapped reading the newspaper. Unlike fashion or commercial photography, Godlis’s aim is to capture the transient micro-stories of everyday people – however mundane or exciting that may be,  which is why he says street photography is mostly ‘making something out of nothing’

In the book's foreword, Sante writes: 'In New York the stakes are higher; their equivalent there is an angry white man in a topcoat who carries a copy of Playboy like a legal brief, and who probably owns entire blocks of tenements in the Bronx. Like the Bostonians he wears a cigar in his kisser like a weapon'

In the book’s foreword, Sante writes: ‘In New York the stakes are higher; their equivalent there is an angry white man in a topcoat who carries a copy of Playboy like a legal brief, and who probably owns entire blocks of tenements in the Bronx. Like the Bostonians he wears a cigar in his kisser like a weapon’

Godlis calls New York City, 'the capitol of street photography' because the streets are constantly buzzing  with overcrowded sidewalks teaming with drama, street vendors, performers, punks, preachers, ethnic diversity, artists, children, working girls, bankers, blue bloods, bohemians, homeless, housewives, drunks, drug addicts and tourists. He doesn't know what exactly was happening in this picture, but feels assured someone took care of the crying child

Godlis calls New York City, ‘the capitol of street photography’ because the streets are constantly buzzing  with overcrowded sidewalks teaming with drama, street vendors, performers, punks, preachers, ethnic diversity, artists, children, working girls, bankers, blue bloods, bohemians, homeless, housewives, drunks, drug addicts and tourists. He doesn’t know what exactly was happening in this picture, but feels assured someone took care of the crying child

Balloons obscure the faces of two children sitting on a busy curb in Manhattan. Godlis said: 'Walking around and catching the rhythm of the street while taking photographs is like therapy to me. It grounds me'

Balloons obscure the faces of two children sitting on a busy curb in Manhattan. Godlis said: ‘Walking around and catching the rhythm of the street while taking photographs is like therapy to me. It grounds me’



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2020 International Landscape Photographer of the Year competition reveals winning images 


Definitely a tonic for troubled times. 

These are the winning and shortlisted images in the 2020 International Landscape Photographer of the Year competition, with stunning shots documenting everything from magical mountains in Norway to dramatic storm clouds over Kansas and the lush green forest of Wistman’s Wood in Dartmoor National Park. 

There were almost 3,800 entries from photographers around the globe, leaving the judges chosen to whittle them down with a headache-inducing task.

Scooping the top prize and the title of ‘photographer of the year’ (an award based on a folio submission of at least four images) was Kelvin Yuen from Hong Kong and his striking mountain photos snapped around the globe in locations such as the Scottish Highlands and Utah. 

German photographer Kai Hornung snared the ‘photograph of the year’ prize (awarded for a single image) for his striking aerial photo of a stream in the highlands of Iceland. In addition, the judges shortlisted their top 101 images submitted to the contest, which have been brought together in an eBook on the International Landscape Photographer of the Year website.

Scroll down to see a selection of the winners and shortlisted entries – which one is your favourite? 

Kelvin Yuen from Hong Kong was named the overall winner of the seventh International Landscape Photographer of the Year competition. This is one of the images – ‘Magical Night’ – that helped him clinch the title. It was snapped in Tromso, Norway 

This is the overall photograph of the year. It's called Life Streams and was taken by Kai Hornung in the highlands of Iceland

This is the overall photograph of the year. It’s called Life Streams and was taken by Kai Hornung in the highlands of Iceland

This dramatic image called Chaos over Kansas was taken by Frederic Couzinier in the city of Winona in Kansas. It was named as one of the judges' top 101 pictures

This dramatic image called Chaos over Kansas was taken by Frederic Couzinier in the city of Winona in Kansas. It was named as one of the judges’ top 101 pictures

A serene shot of Northeast Greenland National Park by photographer Craig McGowan. It was among the 101 top images as picked by the judges. Craig called the shot Fjord Head

A serene shot of Northeast Greenland National Park by photographer Craig McGowan. It was among the 101 top images as picked by the judges. Craig called the shot Fjord Head 

This beautiful image of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California was snapped by Simon Xu and made the top 101 photos

This beautiful image of the Sierra Nevada mountain range in California was snapped by Simon Xu and made the top 101 photos

Another image by Simon Xu that made the top 101 image ranking. This one was snapped in Altay in Xinjing, China, and is called Canyon Grandeur

Another image by Simon Xu that made the top 101 image ranking. This one was snapped in Altay in Xinjing, China, and is called Canyon Grandeur 

Italian photographer Isabella Tabacchi took third place in the International Landscape Photographer of the Year contest. This beguiling image of hers shows the Vilyuchik stratovolcano, located on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula, garlanded by clouds and with yellow rhododendron in the foreground

Italian photographer Isabella Tabacchi took third place in the International Landscape Photographer of the Year contest. This beguiling image of hers shows the Vilyuchik stratovolcano, located on Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula, garlanded by clouds and with yellow rhododendron in the foreground

This stunning image, by Nick Green, features in the judges' top 101 image list. It shows the view across Wistman's Wood in Dartmoor National Park

This stunning image, by Nick Green, features in the judges’ top 101 image list. It shows the view across Wistman’s Wood in Dartmoor National Park

Photographer Klaus Axelsen is behind this beautiful image of the Lyngen Alps in Troms, Northern Norway. He called the photo Blue Hour Scenery

Photographer Klaus Axelsen is behind this beautiful image of the Lyngen Alps in Troms, Northern Norway. He called the photo Blue Hour Scenery

Amarate Tansawet made the top 101 thanks to this shot of Japan's Mount Fuji taken from Lake Kawaguchi

Amarate Tansawet made the top 101 thanks to this shot of Japan’s Mount Fuji taken from Lake Kawaguchi

This incredible top 101 image, called Light of Snow, was snapped by photographer Tony Wang on Norway's Senja Island

This incredible top 101 image, called Light of Snow, was snapped by photographer Tony Wang on Norway’s Senja Island

On the left is a shot called Interstellar by American photographer Joshua Snow, who was named International Landscape Photographer of the Year runner-up. His stunning image was taken in the arid desert of the New Mexico Badlands

American photographer Chance Allred captured this beautiful scene in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah

On the left is a shot called Interstellar by American photographer Joshua Snow, who was named International Landscape Photographer of the Year runner-up. His stunning image was taken in the arid desert of the New Mexico Badlands. On the right is a beautiful scene in Capitol Reef National Park in Utah captured by American photographer Chance Allred 

Another shot by runner-up Joshua Snow. Called Beyond, it shows the stunning landscape in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

Another shot by runner-up Joshua Snow. Called Beyond, it shows the stunning landscape in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

American David Swindler is the photographer behind this awesome top 101 image - Lightning Rainbow - which was snapped in southern Arizona

American David Swindler is the photographer behind this awesome top 101 image – Lightning Rainbow – which was snapped in southern Arizona

An incredible shot of Hintersee, a lake in Berchtesgaden National Park in Germany. The amazing scene was captured by photographer Alexander Lauterbach and is in the top 101 image list

An incredible shot of Hintersee, a lake in Berchtesgaden National Park in Germany. The amazing scene was captured by photographer Alexander Lauterbach and is in the top 101 image list

Torres del Paine National Park in Chile at its bewitching best, framed with consummate skill by photographer Yuekai Du from China in a top 101 image he called Jurassic

Torres del Paine National Park in Chile at its bewitching best, framed with consummate skill by photographer Yuekai Du from China in a top 101 image he called Jurassic

Another stunning shot of Torres del Paine National Park in Chile by Yuekai Du. This one, also in the top 101 list, is called Banquet

Another stunning shot of Torres del Paine National Park in Chile by Yuekai Du. This one, also in the top 101 list, is called Banquet

Another Yuekai Du masterpiece, this time of Monte Fitz Roy in Argentinian Patagonia under a blanket of stars. He called the image Oreo

 Another Yuekai Du masterpiece, this time of Monte Fitz Roy in Argentinian Patagonia under a blanket of stars. He called the image Oreo  

This haunting, misty shot of Hirzel in Switzerland was snapped by photographer Nick Schmid. The judges deemed it definite top 101 material

This haunting, misty shot of Hirzel in Switzerland was snapped by photographer Nick Schmid. The judges deemed it definite top 101 material 

This jaw-dropping image of the moon shining over the Ijen volcano complex on Java island in Indonesia was taken by photographer Miller Yao. It made the judges' top 101 images list

This jaw-dropping image of the moon shining over the Ijen volcano complex on Java island in Indonesia was taken by photographer Miller Yao. It made the judges’ top 101 images list

Photographer Zhu Xiao made it into the judges' top 101 images list with this incredible nighttime snap of the red dunes of Sossusvlei in Namibia

Photographer Zhu Xiao made it into the judges’ top 101 images list with this incredible nighttime snap of the red dunes of Sossusvlei in Namibia

An atmospheric shot of Motukiekie Beach on the west coast of New Zealand's South Island by Russian photographer Sergey Aleshchenko. It made the judges' top 101 images list

An atmospheric shot of Motukiekie Beach on the west coast of New Zealand’s South Island by Russian photographer Sergey Aleshchenko. It made the judges’ top 101 images list

Iceberg Alley is the name of this stunning image by Christopher Anderson, which made it into the top 101. He snapped the photo in Scoresby Sund in eastern Greenland

Iceberg Alley is the name of this stunning image by Christopher Anderson, which made it into the top 101. He snapped the photo in Scoresby Sund in eastern Greenland

This magnificent image, called Hide & Seek, was snapped by Felix Roser and is in the judges' top 101 images. It shows Little Tipsoo Lake in the Cascade Mountain Range in Washington State

This magnificent image, called Hide & Seek, was snapped by Felix Roser and is in the judges’ top 101 images. It shows Little Tipsoo Lake in the Cascade Mountain Range in Washington State

This stunning top 101 image, by Gergo Rugli, is called Nereus. He snapped it in the Australian coastal town of Kiama in New South Wales

This stunning top 101 image, by Gergo Rugli, is called Nereus. He snapped it in the Australian coastal town of Kiama in New South Wales

Photographer Jim Hildreth snapped this fascinating black-and-white image of the foothills of Mount Diablo in California. The photo, called Morning Majesty, features in the judges' top 101 images list

Photographer Jim Hildreth snapped this fascinating black-and-white image of the foothills of Mount Diablo in California. The photo, called Morning Majesty, features in the judges’ top 101 images list



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Photographer captures heron being attacked by eel in flight | The State



In social networks a photograph has generated a great sensation made by photographer and engineer Sam David, who managed to capture a somewhat surreal scene and hard to believe.

It turns out that a couple of days ago, David left his home in Maryland to take pictures of a fox or eagle, when suddenly, He looked up at the sky and came across a heron flying through the air, but wearing something strange, apparently, around its neck.

At first, the photographer thought a snake had become entangled in the bird, so he soon grabbed his camera and quickly took a couple of shots to see if he could capture the scene.

But when he came home and began to edit the photos on his computer, he noticed that it was actually something else.

“Initially, I thought that the heron had been bitten on the neck by a snake or an eel. When I got home and edited the photos I could see that it was an eel that pierced his neck. I could see her eyes and she was still alive, “said Davis in an interview for The Sun.

Animal experts indicated that recently it was discovered that leels have the very hard tip of their tails, which they use to try to escape from places where they are trapped. That was how surely, it used it to pierce the heron’s stomach while it flew.

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Headlines UK London

Wildlife photographer is clueless stag has crept up behind him as he tries to capture a shot


No I-DEER! Wildlife photographer is clueless stag has crept up behind him as he tries to capture the perfect shot at London park

  • Breath-taking image any wildlife photographer would be delighted to capture
  • But this one has his long lens camera pointing in wrong direction in Bushy Park
  • Moment was captured by another keen wildlife photographer, Roger Clark, 75

It takes a mighty long time to get a decent wildlife shot and even longer for a cracking one.

And this is a breath-taking image that any wildlife photographer would be delighted to capture: a magnificent stag stood frozen-still among a thick carpet of ferns for one magical split-second moment.

But apparently oblivious to the picture opportunity just a few feet away, this unfortunate amateur snapper had his long lens camera pointing entirely in the wrong direction in Bushy Park, west London.

Psst…….I’m right behind you! This unfortunate amateur snapper had his long lens camera pointing entirely in the wrong direction in Bushy Park, west London

The blissfully unaware photographer must now be kicking himself for missing the money shot while being too engrossed in taking a perfect photo in the far distance on Wednesday.

The astonishing moment was captured by another keen wildlife photographer, Roger Clark, 75, who was hoping for pictures of the red deer during their breeding season, during which there are frequent displays of rutting. 

Roger said: ‘We hadn’t covered the red deer breeding season this year and with rutting continuing we through we would try our luck.’ 

What's the problem? Any wildlife photographer would be delighted to capture this magical moment but this one is clueless as to what is going on right behind him

What’s the problem? Any wildlife photographer would be delighted to capture this magical moment but this one is clueless as to what is going on right behind him

‘We spotted a man with a camera mounted on a tripod intently focused on some deer activity in the ferns in front of him unaware of the large animal behind him.

 ‘Given the angle I was positioned, it looked like the stag was nuzzled up to pick a pocket from his jeans so I took a photo as it looked comical.

‘But it was quite bizarre that a wild animal would be so close without being noticed. 

‘A few seconds later the deer backed off and with those large beautiful shiny eyes seemed to look at the photographer and say ‘your model is right behind you! Am I not good enough for you?’

‘The photographer never did realise the opportunity he missed and the red deer and I collectively gave up and wandered off in different directions.’ 



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Photographer manages to capture one of the 8 black tigers that live on the planet | The NY Journal


It is believed that there are only 8 such tigers in the world.

Photo:
GEORGE DESIPRIS / Pexels

It happened at the Nandankanan zoo, in the state of Odisha, India. Soumen Bajpayee, an amateur photographer, captured one of the 8 ultra-rare black tigers that exist in the wild. Due to a genetic condition, These animals are born with thick black stripes that cover the characteristic orange hair underneath.

In dialogue with him Times of India, Soumen said he was impressed by the unique sighting and said he felt lucky and grateful to have been able to see the animal. “At that time I did not know that black tigers existed. I saw him, he came from the forest, he stayed a few seconds and went through the trees, ”he continued.

Dr Bivash Pandav, a scientist at the Indian Wildlife Institute, told the newspaper that there are believed to be as many as 8 black tigers in the world. According to the wildlife expert, “the inbreeding trend could be causing slower reproduction.” Black tigers are smaller than the original species and were first seen in India in 1990.

The vast forests and varied habitat of Odisha are the reason for their stay there. The technology teacher, fond of photography, took advantage of “the beginner’s luck” of having come across the strange animal and had the reflections to point the camera and capture images unique in the world. India is home to 70 percent of the world’s tiger population.

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