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Headlines UK

People share their VERY scathing replies to unwanted texts from their desperate exes

No love lost! People share their VERY scathing replies to unwanted texts from former flames – including one woman who said she was BURNING her ex’s clothes

  • A hilarious online gallery collated by Baklol has published some of the responses
  • One replied to a request to pick stuff up with a picture of his burning clothes 
  • Another told their ex not to stand too close to a radiator ‘because plastic melts’


Categories
Canada

Alberta cancels 11 coal leases in the Rockies

The Alberta government was forced by public pressure to reverse plans to expand coal mining in the Rockies.

Provincial Energy Minister Sonya Savage said Monday that the Conservative government is canceling 11 recently issued coal leases after the decision to suspend future sales of mining leases.

“This break will give our government an opportunity to ensure that the interests of Albertans, as owners of mineral resources, are protected,” Minister Savage said in a press release.

Public opposition to the Conservative government’s plan escalated with two petitions that garnered more than 100,000 signatures on Monday, Global News reported.

However, canceled leases represent a tiny fraction of the number of existing coal leases, environmentalists say.

According to the Canadian Nature and Parks Society, 840,000 hectares are still at risk and that the 11 canceled leases represent barely 1,800 hectares of the area already leased.

For its part, the NDP evokes a “small victory” and believes that the threat persists, since eight other leases are still in force.

Categories
California Headline USA Los Angeles New York Politics

COVID cases are down 11% across the US, deaths are dropping in 18 states

New cases of COVID-19 are down nearly 11 percent across the United States with deaths dropping in 18 states, Johns Hopkins University data released Monday shows.  

A total of 35 states have seen a decline in the number of people testing positive in the last seven days with 1.5 million Americans told they had the virus over the past week, CNN reports. 

And Dr Anthony Fauci told church leaders he predicts congregations will be ‘back singing inside churches by fall’ as long as the US can vaccinate ‘appropriately, effectively, and efficiently’. 

He said that ‘the level of virus in the community will be at such a low level’ once the vast majority of the population has received the jab ‘that we will be able to really approach a degree of normality that’s similar, maybe not identical, but similar to where we were before all of this’. 

Only a little over 14 million Americans have been vaccinated against COVID-19 as of Monday morning, and only about 54 percent of vaccine doses distributed to states have been administered to people, according to data from Bloomberg.  

And warning against drawing too much optimism from the data which shows deaths and cases dropping infectious disease expert Dr. Amesh Adalja said: ‘These kinds of fluctuations, on a statistical basis, aren’t sustainable.

‘The virus has established itself in the human population and it’s not going anywhere. We’re going to see a lot of transmission until we cross the threshold for herd immunity. There has not been enough vaccination to see a full effect nationally.’ 

New COVID cases averaged about 218,000 a day over the past week; that figure has ranged from 101,000 to 302,000 in the past month. 

Dr. Edison Liu of The Jackson Laboratory said the broader trends could mean the US is starting to flatten the curve. Dr Liu said: ‘Flattening the curve means we’ve stopped the exponential rise of infection; that whatever intervention we have worked. But that’s only the first step. What we’re really looking for is a consistent downward trend.’ 

There were 123,848 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Monday and an additional 1,393 deaths, the COVID tracking project reports. More than 24 million Americans have tested positive for the virus; nearly 400,000 have died. 

New cases of COVID-19 are down nearly 11 percent across the United States with deaths dropping in 18 states

A total of 35 states have seen a decline in the number of people testing positive in the last seven days.  John Hopkins say of this graph: 'The greener the background, the bigger the downward trend of new cases in this state. The redder the background, the bigger the upward trend of new cases in this state'

A total of 35 states have seen a decline in the number of people testing positive in the last seven days.  John Hopkins say of this graph: ‘The greener the background, the bigger the downward trend of new cases in this state. The redder the background, the bigger the upward trend of new cases in this state’

There were 123,848 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Monday and an additional 1,393 deaths, the COVID tracking project reports. More than 24 million Americans have tested positive for the virus; nearly 400,000 have died

There were 123,848 people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 as of Monday and an additional 1,393 deaths, the COVID tracking project reports. More than 24 million Americans have tested positive for the virus; nearly 400,000 have died

North Dakota has emerged as America’s unlikely leader in the battle against the coronavirus, racing ahead of most of the nation in the vaccine rollout and battling back from being the worst COVID hotspot in the nation with an 80 percent decline in active cases since mid-November.  

And while some states like California are floundering with vaccination rollout, using a meager 37 percent of doses distributed to it, North Dakota is flying through the doses sent to it by the federal government, using 78 percent of its allotted doses and vaccinating just shy of seven percent of its population. 

State officials acknowledge that North Dakota’s small population size is an advantage. But it also gave health care workers a head-start with training before vaccine doses arrived, and has set up a flexible plan to let people 65 or older, people with two or more underlying conditions, and child care and school workers get priority access to vaccines. 

States like California are floundering with vaccination rollout, using a meager 37 percent of doses distributed to it. A healthcare worker draws blood from a motorist at the Southside Church of Christ in Los Angeles, California, on Monday as free rapid Covid-19 antibody and PCR tests are administered

States like California are floundering with vaccination rollout, using a meager 37 percent of doses distributed to it. A healthcare worker draws blood from a motorist at the Southside Church of Christ in Los Angeles, California, on Monday as free rapid Covid-19 antibody and PCR tests are administered

California and New York may be known for their top-notch hospitals and medical schools, but they are struggling to get people vaccinated amid the COVID-19 crisis. 

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo has blamed the federal government for his state only getting 5.14 percent of its population vaccinated by Monday, and asked for federal permission to order doses directly from Pfizer. 

But the Empire State has only used a little over half (53 percent) of what the Trump administration has shipped to it, and its stiff plan for prioritizing people saw precious doses of vaccine thrown out earlier this month. 

California lags even further behind, vaccinating just 3.3 percent of its population with the massive allotment of 3.5 million doses sent to it by the federal government. 

And in Florida, which was the third state to reach one million COVID-19 cases, more than 40,000 people are overdue for their second dose of COVID-19 vaccine – a worrying sign that poor organization could leave at-risk residents unprotected. 

North Dakota has given nearly 53,000 of the 76,275 doses sent to it, and kept up a consistent flow of administering vaccines since its first doses arrived last month (pictured), according to the state's health department

North Dakota has given nearly 53,000 of the 76,275 doses sent to it, and kept up a consistent flow of administering vaccines since its first doses arrived last month (pictured), according to the state’s health department 

Active coronavirus cases have fallen by 80% and the number of new daily infections in the state is a fraction of what it had been a month ago when North Dakota was among the nation's top hotspots

Active coronavirus cases have fallen by 80% and the number of new daily infections in the state is a fraction of what it had been a month ago when North Dakota was among the nation’s top hotspots 

Cumulative deaths have increased in North Dakota, but the state has drastically bent the curve of fatalities since it climbed steeply last month, reaching a peak of 499 deaths in November, followed by 278 in December and 37 so far in January

Cumulative deaths have increased in North Dakota, but the state has drastically bent the curve of fatalities since it climbed steeply last month, reaching a peak of 499 deaths in November, followed by 278 in December and 37 so far in January 

North Dakota administered 3,222 vaccines on January 14 alone, according to its latest data. Nearly six percent of its population has had their first shot, and nearly one percent have already received their second. 

Meanwhile, the state has 1,377 active cases of COVID-19 as of Monday – just a little over 10 percent as many as it saw at its November peak of 10,195. 

Deaths in North Dakota continue to climb, but have leveled off since November.   

Throughout much the nation, a game of federal and state he-said-she-said continues, and is doing little to speed the sluggish rollout. 

Houston, Texas, officials say they are receiving sporadic shipments of small numbers of vaccine doses. 

‘Right now, having (doses) one day and then running out, it just creates a lot of chaos,’ said Galveston County health director Dr Philip Keiser on Monday, according to Houston Public Media. 

About 31.1 million doses of coronavirus vaccines have been sent to US states by the federal government, according to tracking from Bloomberg. 

While West Virginia races to the head of the pack, vaccinating nearly nine percent of its population in just a month, California and Alabama rank worst, getting shots in the arms of just 3.3 percent and 2.7 percent of their residents, respectively. 

Mass vaccination sites opened in larger states like New York, California and Florida, but rates of shot administration remain low. 

Some of the states that have most vocally blamed the federal government for the vaccine rollout are among the slowest to use the doses sent to them.  

California has vaccinated just 3.3 percent of its population and used a little over a third of its allotted doses, despite turning Disneyland and Dodger Stadium into mass vaccination sites.  

Only about 3% of Americans have gotten their first doses of coronavirus vaccines, with the highest rates in West Virginia and the Dakotas, and the lowest rates of vaccination are in Alabama and Arizona 

More than half of all doses of coronavirus vaccines distributed to US states are sitting on the shelves, with the highest rates of unused shots in California and Texas – despite the former being  one of the worst hotspots for COVID-19 in the country 

New York is faring a little better using up 53 percent of its doses and vaccinated about 5.4 percent of its population. 

Southern and Sun Belt states are struggling. Alabama and Arizona have each vaccinated just 2.7 percent of their populations. 

That’s particularly worrisome for Arizona, which has had more coronavirus infections per capita than any where else in the world.  

The surprise leaders in the race remain West Virginia and the Dakotas.  

West Virginia was the only state in the union turned down the federal government’s partnership with CVS and WalGreens to help vaccinate its nursing home residents. 

And now it’s vaccinated 8.6 percent of its population – more than than any other states. 

North and South Dakota have vaccinated nearly seven and 6.45 percent of their respective populations. 

A senior federal official told DailyMail.com that the US will meet its goal of distributing 50 million doses to states this week.  

But at this rate, it could be weeks before all of those doses make it into Americans’ arms. 

States have given fewer than half of the doses the federal government has shipped – 46 percent – yet some say they are running out of doses. 

Reports emerged last week that there was no federal stockpile of second doses to increase states’ supplies – after HHS Secretary Alex Azar promised that the reserve would be released – triggering panic. 

Federal officials say that the number of doses made available to states each week has increased, but that the notion that the government ever had a stockpile was incorrect. 

In fact, a senior administration official told DailyMail.com that some states are not completing all their orders for new doses each week, leaving them shorthanded. 

Yet states, including Texas, say they’re on pace to run out of doses of vaccine by next week if they continue to administer as many as possible. 

Los Angeles is among the worst hotspots for coronavirus in the US and health workers are racing to vaccinate at-risk people - including nursing home residents in Pasadena (pictured, file), but the state has used just 27.5% of its allotted doses

Los Angeles is among the worst hotspots for coronavirus in the US and health workers are racing to vaccinate at-risk people – including nursing home residents in Pasadena (pictured, file), but the state has used just 27.5% of its allotted doses 

Since it began over a month ago, the US coronavirus vaccine rollout has been plagued by a game of federal and state ‘he said, she said,’ and little seems to have changed.  

The emergence of more infectious coronavirus variants, including the UK’s ‘super-covid,’ should be a ‘clarion call’ to Americans to get vaccinated, said Dr Anthony Fauci during a Sunday Meet the Press appearance. 

But the uptake has been slow.  

Experts say yet another factor is holding up the rollout: ‘We’re underselling the vaccine’ Dr Aaron Richterman, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Pennsylvania told the New York Times.  

He’s not alone in thinking that attempts to temper expectations and keep Americans from ripping of their masks as soon as they get their first doses of COVID-19 vaccines may be misguided. 

‘It’s driving me a little bit crazy,’ Dr Ashish Jha of the Brown School of Public told the Times. 

Vaccines made by both Moderna and Pfizer are more than 94 percent effective at preventing COVID-19, and that should be the focus of public messaging, the experts say. 

That’s not to say that questions still being researched – such as rather the shots prevent infection or transmission altogether – should be concealed, nor that warnings about potential side effects shouldn’t be clear. 

But, Dr Jha and Dr Richterman worry that the emphasis on what’s unknown is fueling hesitancy and slowing the uptake of shots. 

One California epidemiologist on Sunday called for Moderna to put a hold on 330,000 doses from one lot that have already been distributed after ‘fewer than 10’ people had possible severe allergic reactions to the shots within 24 hours. 

Moderna, the FDA and the CDC are all investigating the incidences, but said in a statement to Fox News that vaccination is never without risks. 

The reactions all happened within the observation period while the recipients were still at the vaccination site in San Diego.  

Health care workers and nursing home residents were put first in line for coronavirus vaccines. 

But during the first weeks of the rollout, staggering numbers of health care workers turned down the shots. 

One Illinois veterans nursing home said that while about 90 percent of its elderly residents had said ‘yes’ to the shot, some 80 percent of staff had said ‘no.’ 

Nurses in Texas and California – two of the nation’s worst hotspots for COVID-19 – said they and about half of their colleagues planned to refuse or delay vaccination.

In New York, four doses of vaccine had to be thrown out because willing recipients working in health care could not be found in time to use the shots before they expired. 

Amid suspicion that resistance among health care workers and rigid state plans for who could be vaccinated when were the problem, federal officials urged vaccination to be opened up to people 65 and older. 

Categories
Delhi The Buzz

Rahul Gandhi attacks PM on reports of Chinese village in Arunachal


New Delhi, January 19

Congress leader Rahul Gandhi on Tuesday hit out at Prime Minister Narendra Modi on the issue of national security after reports that China has built a village in Arunachal Pradesh.

“Remember his promise – Mai desh jhukne nahi dunga (Will not let the country bow),” Gandhi said in a tweet in Hindi as he posted a link of a news report about the alleged “Chinese village”.

Congress leaders Randeep Surjewala and Manish Tewari also attacked the prime minister on the matter.

“Modiji where is that 56-inch chest,” Surjewala tweeted.

Taking to Twitter, Tewari said, “This is very very serious. Not troops but a whole village ! For God sake”‘.

 “‘@PMOIndia or @rajnathsingh Ji must tell the nation as to whether this is true or false?” he said.

In a cautious reaction to the reports, India had on Monday said it keeps a constant watch on all developments having a bearing on the country’s security, and takes necessary measures to safeguard its sovereignty and territorial integrity.

Congress leader P Chidambaram had on Monday demanded answers from the government on the issue, alleging that BJP MP Tapir Gao has claimed that China has built a 100-house village in the “disputed area” deep into Arunachal Pradesh.

He said if the allegation made out by the BJP MP is true, will the government again give a clean chit to China or will blame the previous governments for it.

“Mr Tapir Gao MP, belonging to BJP, has alleged that deep into Arunachal Pradesh, in a  ‘disputed area’ within Indian territory, the Chinese have built  a 100-house village, a bazaar and a two-lane road in the last year.

“If this is true, it is clear that the Chinese have altered the status quo by converting a disputed area into a permanent settlement of Chinese nationals. What has the government to say about these startling facts,” he had said on Twitter.

The India-China border dispute covers the 3,488-km-long Line of Actual Control (LAC). China claims Arunachal Pradesh as part of southern Tibet, while India contests it.

India and China are locked in a bitter border standoff in eastern Ladakh for over eight months.

India and China have held several rounds of military and diplomatic talks in order to resolve the eastern Ladakh standoff, but no significant headway has been made for its resolution. PTI

 





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Categories
Technology US

VLC now runs natively on M1 Macs

The latest update to ubiquitous open-source media player VLC is here, and it comes with native support for Apple silicon Mac computers — the new versions of the MacBook Pro, the MacBook Air, and the Mac mini with Apple’s own M1 processor. VLC 3.0.12 also includes some visual tweaks to bring it further in line with Big Sur, the latest version of macOS.

Mac apps don’t strictly require native updates to work with the M1 processor, since Apple silicon Macs include Rosetta 2, a translation layer that lets software compiled for x86 processors run surprisingly well on the newer Arm-based hardware. But for an app like VLC, which many users rely on for playback of hefty 4K or 8K video files, the improvements to performance and efficiency could be notable.

As noted by 9to5Mac, the new VLC isn’t a universal binary, which is to say that the Arm-optimized code isn’t yet included by default. The regular VLC app has to be updated to 3.0.12, then again to 3.0.12.1 on an Apple silicon Mac in order to get the optimized version.

Version 3.0.12 also has some minor features and tweaks for VLC on other platforms, including better Blu-ray tracks support and fixing some crashes when using Direct3D 11 on Windows.

Categories
Canada

Keystone pipeline, the first bone of contention between Trudeau and Biden

After four complicated years with Donald Trump, Justin Trudeau is eager to start afresh with Joe Biden. But the willingness given to the new US president to block the construction of an oil pipeline between the two countries upon his arrival at the White House on Wednesday, could complicate the task.

“It’s not the best way to start a relationship,” notes analyst Tim Powers.

The Canadian Prime Minister had congratulated himself on being the first leader to speak on the phone with Mr. Biden soon after his election in November 2020. Some of the opposition is already pushing him to use this relationship to pressure the news administration, while Ottawa on Monday reaffirmed its support for the project.

“As long as the Canadian government has said it will strongly support the Keystone XL pipeline, having a US administration suggesting it is going to be abandoned does not help,” Powers told AFP.

According to several Canadian media, Joe Biden plans to block this controversial pipeline project launched in 2008 – already canceled by Barack Obama for environmental reasons, put back on track by Donald Trump for economic reasons – from the day he takes office Wednesday.

The project of the Canadian group TC Energy, of some 8 billion American dollars (6.6 billion euros), should make it possible to transport from 2023 more than 800,000 barrels of oil per day between the Canadian province of Alberta and the American refineries of the Gulf of Mexico.

But it is criticized by environmentalists because of its impact on greenhouse gas emissions. On Sunday, TC Energy pledged to use only renewable energy to operate the pipeline, hoping to change the mind of the new US administration.

The decision attributed to Mr. Biden to rescind it “puts sticks in the wheels of the Canada-US relationship,” said Ryan Katz-Rosene, professor of politics at the University of Ottawa.

But it could also “make things a little more difficult for Mr. Trudeau at the national level,” he said.

As snap elections loom in 2021 for the Liberal Prime Minister’s minority government, Trudeau finds himself torn between his environmental commitments and opposition pressure to defend an oil sector in crisis , especially since the coronavirus pandemic.

Opposition from environmentalists

“On the Canadian side, we are talking about 100 billion dollars (65 billion euros) in exports each year,” said Jason Kenney, the Premier of Alberta, which concentrates most of the country’s oil reserves on Monday. , Canada’s main export product.

The country has the third proven reserves in the world, mostly contained in the western oil sands whose mining is criticized for its government impact. This is one of the reasons why Team Biden is opposed to this project.

For Mr. Kenney, whose government is funding the project to the tune of more than $ 1 billion, its cancellation would destroy jobs on both sides of the border, weaken relations between the two countries, and make the United States more dependent. of OPEC production.

Justin Trudeau is committed to completing Keystone XL and other pipelines to get Canadian oil to other markets and get a better price.

If the project is abandoned, the oil-rich provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan (center), already hit by falling oil prices, will pay a heavy price and this will have “wider economic repercussions” for the future. Canada, says Powers.

Conservative (opposition) leader Erin O’Toole estimated that such a decision would “devastate thousands of Canadian families already hard hit by the economic crisis” and called on Mr. Trudeau to “communicate immediately with the new American administration to prevent that from happening ”.

The news was nevertheless well received by the New Democratic Party (NDP, left) and by the Greens, whose leader Annamie Paul sees it as “the chance of a lifetime” to carry out joint actions with Mr. Biden, who said “Very clearly that the climate will be at the top of his agenda”.

Natural Resources Minister Seamus O’Regan has defended the continuation of the project: Canadian oil will create “thousands” of jobs “for workers on both sides of the border.”

Categories
Headline USA

Sol Pérez, the Argentine Yanet García, said goodbye to the beach with a new postcard in a bikini | The State

The Argentine Yanet García, Sol Pérez He said goodbye to the Atlantic Coast with a postcard of the last day at the beach of his vacation. After enjoying a few days off with her boyfriend, Guido Mazzoni, the former weather girl resumed her work commitments in Buenos Aires.

Away from the sand, the waves and the sun, she wrote: “Eager to return! What are you doing?”. The publication exceeded 214 thousand likes, and aroused praise from its followers.

In the photos she is seen with another of the bikinis that accompanied her during the summer: this time, she opted for a white two-piece zebra print design that highlighted her shapely curves and tan.

(Swipe to see the photos)

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Sol Perez (@lasobrideperez)

Days ago, Sol raised the temperature when he appeared posing in profile facing the sea with another tiny and daring swimsuit.

View this post on Instagram

A post shared by Sol Perez (@lasobrideperez)

Jailyne Ojeda exposes her entire rearguard posing face down with a daring bikini

Lele Pons unleashes criticism and is accused of animal abuse for this video with a crocodile

Demi Rose speeds up Instagram showing her curves in a tiny bikini

.

Categories
Canada

Filipino nanny claims to be a victim of human trafficking

A Filipino domestic worker who claims to have been exploited and abused for four years by her employer in Montreal has filed a $ 1.64 million civil lawsuit against the latter, which she accuses of human trafficking.

“She worked most days from 5 am to 10 pm. During that time, she hasn’t had a day off. She didn’t have a bedroom or private storage space. In the residence, she had to stand or sit on the floor, she was not allowed to use the supplies, ”reads the civil suit filed at the Montreal courthouse.

The 40-year-old woman, who is only identified by her initials because of the abuse – including sexual – she says she suffered, said in the court document to be from Southeast Asia.

And to support her family, she had been hired as a nanny abroad. It was there that she met Alaa Ibrahim, the employer she is now suing.

A degrading life

In the court document, the woman explains that she started acting as a nanny in the United Arab Emirates, where she says she was treated poorly. Then, once in Canada, the situation would not have improved. Because even if she was supposed to be paid around US $ 1,500 per month, her employer would have kept the money “over and over again.”

“He abused his vulnerability to subject him to forced labor as a domestic worker, he made him work excessive hours, deprived him of privacy, restricted his freedom,” the lawsuit said. He intimidated her, threatened her, isolated her, withheld her salary and subjected her to degrading and humiliating living conditions. “

And that was without counting the acts of a sexual nature of which she said she was the victim “at least twice a week”. As her work visa had not been renewed, she was afraid to go out for fear of being arrested.

It wasn’t until July 2019 that the woman said she was able to extricate herself from her employer’s clutches, thanks to a man she met on the internet. When she explained the situation to him, this man allegedly told her that it made no sense, and that she should call the police.

“He explained to her that in Canada the police were helping people, he tried to reassure her,” the court document reads.

Good advice

Soon after, the woman followed this advice and contacted Montreal police, the court document said. She filed a lawsuit claiming $ 1.64 million for her unpaid wages, moral damages “caused by human trafficking and forced labor”, as well as damages due to the alleged sexual assaults.

Unless there is an amicable agreement, the case will soon be presented to a judge. The employer, who is also awaiting a sexual assault trial in another case, could not be reached.

The woman now lives in Montérégie.

Categories
UAE

Bag yourselves a bargain at Babyshop

The Graco Literider Lx Travel Systems including stroller plus car seat with five-point safety harness is available for Dh749
Image Credit: Supplied

Babyshop, the Middle East’s leading retail destination for children and discerning parents, has kicked off 2021 with a bang. It has announced some seriously cool discounts of 25-70 per cent against select items in its travel and nursery categories, to complement the seasonally cool weather.

Start ticking those New Year’s resolutions off the list and clear out and revamp the nursery for a fresh new look and feel. Perhaps it’s time to move the baby to his or her own cot or upgrade to a smart new toddler bed? Head down to Babyshop for a choice of the most popular items at unbeatable prices, and you’ll be a big step closer to your mission of having the whole house sleeping easier at night.

The Madrid 3-in-1 Crib, either in dark chocolate or Bianca white, is now almost half price at Dh1,099 (down from Dh1,999), and the Baker and Abby toddler beds are now just Dh349 (from Dh499).

Image Credit: Supplied

Strollers up for grab

If shedding a few pounds gained during the festivities is top of your to-do list, then there are no excuses to put this off, as baby makes the perfect exercise buddy. Babyshop’s range of strollers and travel systems are offered at a fraction of their original cost, so bring baby along for your morning walk in the park and soon you could be fitting into your favourite jeans again.

Image Credit:

His and Hers Mickey and Minnie strollers can now be picked up for Dh299 (down from Dh899), and the Jeep Compact Air stroller is now just Dh349 (was Dh1,199). The versatile Graco Literider Lx Travel Systems (including stroller plus car seat with five-point safety harness) are now available at Dh749, down from Dh1,099.

So, get ready to shake off those post-festive blues, indulge in some much needed, guilt-free retail therapy, and feel like a new you in no time.

Shop the latest bargains in the comfort and safety of your nearest Babyshop store or online at Babyshopstores.com

This content comes from Reach by Gulf News, which is the branded content team of GN Media.

Categories
Tech News

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 Price, Specifications Tipped


Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 alleged price and specifications have been leaked online by a tipster. The upcoming Galaxy Z Flip 3 could be priced at $1,499 (roughly Rs. 1,09,600), just $50 (roughly Rs. 3,700) more than its predecessor when it was launched. Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3, the rumoured name of the foldable phone, could feature a 120Hz dynamic AMOLED display that will be between 6.7-inch and 6.9-inch, according to the tipster. It may be powered by the Snapdragon 888 SoC.

Tipster Anthony (@TheGalox) tweeted possible key details about the anticipated Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3. The foldable phone is slated to release in June-July, according to the tipster. Earlier, it was predicted to launch in Q1 2021.

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 could have a triple rear camera setup, with possibly the same sensors as the Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 2 – three 12-megapixel cameras, claimed the tipster.

It may come with a glass display and the front display is likely to be very small. As mentioned above, Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 may feature a 120Hz dynamic AMOLED display that could be up to 6.9-inches long, something that an earlier leak had also predicted. The Galaxy Z Flip 5G has a 60Hz display, so this will be a big leap.

The tipster noted that Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 could have better resistance to water and dust as compared to its predecessors. Further, the foldable phone may feature thinner bezels, have a smaller hole-punch cutout, and a new hinge.

Recently, a report had indicated that Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 may come with a camera design similar to that of Samsung Galaxy S21. A concept photo was also shared, where the phone looked like a mix of the original Samsung Galaxy Z Flip and the Samsung Galaxy S21. Samsung will reportedly not call this model Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 2 as predicted earlier, and instead call it Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 3 in order to align the name with Z Fold series.


What will be the most exciting tech launch of 2021? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below.





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