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Letters inviting patients to book Covid-19 jab will be sent out to FIVE MILLION Britons from Monday

Over 5million more Britons will be invited to receive a coronavirus jab from today.

In a major milestone for the vaccination programme, letters will start being sent to those in England in the next two priority groups.

This includes 4.6million in their 70s plus another one million classed as ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’ because they have conditions affecting the immune system, certain cancers or are organ transplant recipients.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said the nation was ‘nearly on the home straight’ as 50 per cent of all over-80s in England have been vaccinated. 

Some 140 a minute are receiving a jab, putting Britain on course to vaccinate all adults by early autumn.

In a major milestone for the vaccination programme, letters will start being sent to people aged over 70 in Britain

In a major milestone for the vaccination programme, letters will start being sent to people aged over 70 in Britain 

Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab pledged that every over-18 will be offered a first jab by September – if not earlier.

And he said he was hopeful some lockdown restrictions could start to be lifted from March. 

Ten new mass vaccination hubs will open today, including Blackburn Cathedral and Taunton Racecourse. In other developments:

  • NHS figures revealed one in six Covid-19 patients in English NHS hospitals arrived without the virus but were infected there since September;
  • Another 671 deaths were recorded, the highest number for any Sunday of the pandemic so far, along with 38,598 new cases;
  • NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens said a patient is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus every 30 seconds;
  • Ex-Supreme Court judge Lord Sumption sparked a row after telling stage 4 bowel cancer sufferer Deborah James on TV that her life was ‘less valuable’ than other people’s;
  • All travellers arriving in Britain face being forced to quarantine in hotels under plans to further lock down the country’s borders;
  • England rugby star Maro Itoje called for every schoolchild to have a laptop as he vowed to tackle the ‘digital divide’;
  • Parks remained packed despite the Prime Minister warning people to ‘think twice’ before leaving the house;
  • Mr Raab warned the public it is ‘too early’ for them to book summer holidays for this year.

Ministers said the priority this week will still be to vaccinate the top two priority groups, made up of care home residents and staff, the over-80s, and NHS workers.

Boris Johnson, pictured with his son Wilfred on Sunday, has promised the first four priority groups will all have received the jab by the middle of February

Boris Johnson, pictured with his son Wilfred on Sunday, has promised the first four priority groups will all have received the jab by the middle of February

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Around 140 people a minute are receiving a jab, putting Britain on course to vaccinate all adults by early autumn

More than 3.8million have received their first vaccine dose so far. But NHS sites which have spare capacity will be allowed to offer jabs to those aged over 70 and those who are ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’.

Boris Johnson has promised the first four priority groups will all have received the jab by the middle of February.

The PM said: ‘Today is a significant milestone in our vaccination programme as we open it up to millions more who are most at risk from Covid-19. We are now delivering the vaccine at a rate of 140 jabs a minute and I want to thank everyone involved in this national effort.

‘We have a long way to go and there will doubtless be challenges ahead – but by working together we are making huge progress in our fight against this virus.’

Mr Hancock added: ‘Now that more than half of all over-80s have had their jab, we can begin vaccinating the next most vulnerable groups.

‘Where an area has already reached the vast majority of groups one and two, they can now start opening up the programme to groups three and four.

NHS sites which have spare capacity will be allowed to offer jabs to those aged over 70 and those who are 'clinically extremely vulnerable'

NHS sites which have spare capacity will be allowed to offer jabs to those aged over 70 and those who are ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’

‘We are working day and night to make sure everyone who is 70 and over, our health and social care workers and the clinically extremely vulnerable are offered the vaccine by the middle of February and our NHS heroes are making huge strides in making this happen.’ Mr Raab said yesterday it would be ‘great’ if the rollout could be faster amid reports that the target of offering everyone in the UK the jab could be met by June, but said the Government was working to the early autumn target.

‘Our target is by September to have offered all the adult population a first dose. If we can do it faster than that, great, but that’s the roadmap,’ he told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge on Sunday.

Mr Raab said the Government hoped 88 per cent of those most at risk of dying from coronavirus would receive their first jab by the middle of February, with 99 per cent of those at greatest risk protected by the early spring.

He suggested lockdown restrictions could then be eased – with a possible return to the tiered system. ‘I think it is fair to say it won’t be a big bang, if you like, it will be done phased, possibly back through the tiered approach,’ he told BBC1’s Andrew Marr Show.

Asked if vaccine supplies are sufficient for someone to get their second dose within 12 weeks, he said ‘we ought to’ be able to deliver.

Sir Simon Stevens said staff were jabbing ‘four times faster’ than people are newly catching the virus.

He also predicted lockdown could be eased ‘gradually’ around spring and summer time. However, he said this would depend on the effect of new variants of coronavirus.

A new strain found in the UK that is more transmissible than previous types is rapidly spreading across the country, and variants found in Brazil and South Africa are also being viewed with concern by virologists in case they are more resistant to vaccines.

Another 671 die from Covid in highest Sunday increase but number of new cases drops 30 per cent to 38,598 in clear sign that latest lockdown is working 

By Danyal Hussain for MailOnline 

A further 671 people have died from Covid-19 today representing the highest Sunday increase, but the number of new cases has dropped by nearly a third since last week, in a clear sign that lockdown is working. 

Official statistics released this afternoon show 38,598 new cases of coronavirus have been recorded across Britain.

Last Sunday, the first under England’s third lockdown, saw 54,940 new cases recorded. 

Today’s death toll represents the highest seen on a Sunday, with the previous tally reaching 657 last April.

Government figures released the total number of coronavirus cases recorded in the UK up to 3.39m.

It comes as NHS England chief executive Sir Simon Stevens revealed someone in Britain is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus ‘every thirty seconds’. 

Another 704 people have died with Covid-19 in British hospitals, it was announced this afternoon, with 631 of those in England

Another 704 people have died with Covid-19 in British hospitals, it was announced this afternoon, with 631 of those in England 

The NHS boss, who was appearing on the Andrew Marr show, said that hospitals had seen a huge increase in patients since Christmas and added that there are enough new cases to fill a whole hospital every morning. 

He also revealed that a quarter of the admissions are people under the age of 55.  

Sir Simon said: ‘The facts are very clear and I’m not going to sugar-coat them, hospitals are under extreme pressure and staff are under extreme pressure.

‘Since Christmas Day we’ve seen another 15,000 increase in the in-patients in hospitals across England, that’s the equivalent of filling 30 hospitals full of coronavirus patients.

‘Staggeringly, every thirty seconds across England another patient is being admitted to hospital with coronavirus.’ 

The surging death rate comes despite hopes infections might finally be tailing off. A raft of official data and scientific estimates published this week offered the strongest evidence yet that the tough lockdown restrictions have worked.

Cambridge University researchers believe the R rate – the average number of people each infected person passes the disease onto – may have dipped to as low as 0.6 in London and the South East. The figure must be below one for an outbreak to shrink.

Public Health England revealed weekly Covid cases have fallen in every age group except the over-80s, despite the spread of the highly infectious variant first spotted in Kent which officials feared couldn’t be contained.

Figures for Covid deaths in English hospitals today revealed patients who died were aged between 29 and 103. 

All except 31, aged between 46 and 93, had known underlying health conditions.

The deaths were between November 5 and January 16. 

No new Covid deaths were reported in Scotland today, while Wales recorded 48 and Northern Ireland announced 25.

In more positive news, he also revealed that a trial for 24-hour Covid vaccines within the next 10 days. 

When asked if he would like to see jabs given ‘all day, all night’, Sir Simon said: ‘Absolutely, we will do that at the point that we have enough supply that it makes sense.  

‘We will start testing 24/7 in some hospitals over the course of the next 10 days.

‘But we are at the moment vaccinating at about 140 jabs a minute and yesterday (Saturday), a quarter of a million people got their vaccinations on the NHS.

‘I’m pretty confident by the time we get to the end of today, Sunday night, we will have perhaps done 1.5 million vaccinations this past week, that’s up from around a million the week before.’

‘We are vaccinating four times faster than people are catching coronavirus.’

He also insisted that no vaccines were being thrown away by doctors, despite reports. 

Sir Simon said: ‘The guidance from the chief medical officer and NHS medical director is crystal clear, that every last drop of vaccine should be used.’ 

Sir Simon said the NHS is facing the most ‘unique’ situation in its history.

Asked if the nation’s health service has ever been in a more precarious situation, he told the Andrew Marr show: ‘No. This is a unique event in our 72-year history, it’s become glib to talk about this as the worst pandemic in a century, but that is clearly correct.

‘We have got three-quarters more Covid inpatients now then we had in the April peak.

‘Although we are seeing some promising signs of the steadying of the infection rates, the fact is they are still far too high and, among some age groups, still rising.’

He added: ‘It is not going to be the case that on Valentine’s Day, with one bound, we are free.

‘Equally, I don’t think we will have to wait until the autumn, I think somewhere between those two.’ 

Categories
Football USA Headline USA Sports USA

Uruguayan Academy of Letters protests the punishment of Cavani for “racism” | The State

The National Academy of Letters of Uruguay showed this Friday “its most energetic rejection” of the sanction imposed by the English football federation on Edinson Cavani, of Manchester United, for a comment on social media that you have considered racist.

In a statement posted on its website, it ensures that said penalty “Warns about the poverty of cultural and linguistic knowledge that this Federation reveals when founding such a questionable resolution ”.

“As is well known, references to physical, moral or personal qualities of other people are used in all the languages ​​of the world for the creation of vocatives, that is, expressions to treat others. In some contexts these have a negative tenor and many times the same terms can be considered affectionate or friendlyExplains the document.

On November 29, shortly after a comeback against Southampton, Cavani responded to a message from a follower with the phrase in Spanish “gracias negrito.”

The player later withdrew that comment and posted a statement in which he apologized and assured that he is “absolutely opposed to racism.”

As the Academy explains, in Uruguay “you can hear and read forms like gordis, chubby, negri, negrito / a “ and the person who is treated with these vocatives “does not have to be overweight or have a dark skin color to receive them.”

“Cavani’s use of the black voice to address“ pablofer2222 ”, a soccer player’s fan, has this kind of affectionate tenor: given the context in which it was written, the person to whom was run and the variety of Spanish used, the only value that black can have – and in particular because of its diminutive nature – is affective ”, he says.

Finally, the statement points out that the FA “has committed a grave injustice” and has revealed “ignorance and error regarding the uses of the language and in particular of Spanish, sin taking note of all its complexities and contexts ”.

Cavani was sanctioned this Thursday with more than $ 100,000 dollars and three games for your comment on the networks.

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Edinson Cavani wants to be the man who arrives at Barcelona instead of Lautaro

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Categories
Entertainment Canada

Give back the letters of nobility to the first names Kevin

Not easy, his name is Kevin. A popular name in the 1990s, this one comes with its share of prejudices. This is what we see when listening to the documentary The problem with Kevin (and Kéven and Kaven), hosted by Pierre-Yves Lord and broadcast on Crave since Friday.

The host looked at the origins of the first name and how it has been “culturally devalued” over the years, first by forming focus groups with people who share their perceptions of Kevin. These really “disturbed”, argues Pierre-Yves Lord.

“It made me feel better that this documentary was necessary,” he said on the other end of the phone. It’s no urban legend that there is prejudice against the Kevins. People were talking very, very harsh words. For them, a Kevin cannot become prime minister. Kevin a surgeon, that’s not credible. ”

Between presentations by communications specialists and sociologists, Pierre-Yves Lord met several Kevins from all walks of life who recount what they experienced in relation to their first names. They brilliantly defeat stereotypes, since each of them has done very well in life.

A popular first name

The first name Kevin had its heyday in the early 1990s.

In 1993, 2.5% of children born that year were named Kevin.

Quebecers were thus influenced by Americans, since at the time there were very popular Kevin’s there, such as Kevin Costner and Kevin McCallister, character in the film. Mom I missed the plane.

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Health

COVID Leads to Heartbreaking Letters to Santa


Dec. 11, 2020 — For more than a century, children across the country have sent letters to Santa Claus through the United States Postal Service’s Operation Santa program. But this holiday season, those letters look a lot different.

Countless children have written Santa about the coronavirus pandemic, with some simply begging for an end to the virus and nothing else, according to photocopies shared to the USPS website.

“Dear Santa, I don’t want anything for Christmas, but I would like to ask you if you can do me a favor,” a little boy named Jonah wrote. “Can you please find a cure for COVID-19 and give it to us to save the world. Thank you.”

“This year has been tough on all of us due to COVID-19,” wrote 13-year-old Kimberly. “My stepdad is the only [one] working and because of COVID-19 he had to stop working full time. Now he is working less because of COVID, and all the money he gets is for paying the rent and the bills,” she continued. “I really hope you can help my family and I. I know it’s a lot but I really believe in you.”

“I’m sorry if I’ve been bad,” another little girl in Massachusetts confessed to Santa. “It’s really hard because of COVID-19, and online school (school in general). I’m trying to be good. Hope you understand.”

Andy, a 5-year-old in California, asked Santa for a Nintendo Switch to share with his little brother — and for life to get back to normal. “I know it is a lot of money so it’s OK if we don’t get one,” he wrote. “Thank you, Santa! I wish COVID was over so we can hug.”

Many more children have written St. Nick asking for world peace and masks, among other things.

“COVID-19 resulted in job losses, temporary unemployment, and, sadly, the loss of family and friends,” Kim Frum, USPS senior public relations representative, told WebMD. “Couple that with devastation from natural disasters, and it’s easy to see why [the] USPS Operation Santa program is more important than ever.”


According to Frum, the program has always been about providing joy and holiday gifts for families in need — a reality for many Americans in 2020. “This year, there are likely more families impacted financially and emotionally,” she said. “Being able to provide even the tiniest bit of normalcy or spark of happiness to those in need would mean the world to so many people right now.”

The Postal Service first started receiving letters to Santa Claus in 1912. Soon after that, employees and citizens were authorized to respond to the letters, paving the way for Operation Santa. Over the course of 108 years, the program has received hundreds of thousands of letters from children all over the U.S.

Nowadays, people can go online to look through the letters and “adopt” as many as they’d like. Last year, thousands of children’s letters were adopted, and more than 11,000 packages were sent in response. As of this week, nearly 18,000 letters to Santa have been adopted and more than 32,000 people have registered to adopt one.

Letters to Santa will be accepted through Dec. 15, and all envelopes must include Santa’s official mailing address (Santa Claus 123 Elf Road North Pole, 88888), a return address, and a stamp. Once Operation Santa receives a child’s letter, all personally identifiable information — such as last name or address — is hidden.

People have until Dec. 19 to adopt a letter, according to the USPS. Due to safety concerns, adopters need to be vetted by the Postal Service before they answer any mail. After a quick verification process, those who are greenlighted can mail their Christmas packages at their local Post Office, to remain anonymous. To learn more about adopting a letter, visit www.uspsoperationsanta.com.



WebMD Health News


Sources

Kim Frum, senior public relations representative, U.S. Postal Service.


U.S. Postal Service: Operation Santa
.



© 2020 WebMD, LLC. All rights reserved.





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UAE

Lockdown letters: Students, parents, teachers in UAE pen COVID-19 life lessons

The campaign is encouraging students, teachers and parents to pen memoirs to be read in the future.
Image Credit: Supplied

Dubai: If you could write a letter to your future self, what would you say?

A school group in the UAE, International Schools Partnership (ISP), is ‘Writing Letters for Tomorrow’ — a campaign encouraging students, teachers and parents to pen memoirs to be read in the future, so lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic are not lost.

Four schools in the UAE from ISP, which has 46 schools teaching multiple curricula to around 45,000 students in several countries, took part in the month-long campaign that ends today.

‘Thread of hope’

“We live in a world forever changed by COVID-19 and one of the threads that continues to bind us together is that of hope. We have learned so much during this time and we want to ensure that the lessons of today are not forgotten. Through ‘Writing Letters for Tomorrow’ we have asked our families and staff to write letters for them to read again in the future, or to have their children read in the future, that share their experiences of being in a lockdown, and dealing with the pandemic,” said Bharat Mansukhani, regional managing director — Middle East, ISP.

Bharat Mansukhani-1607146115446
Bharat Mansukhani, regional managing director — Middle East, ISP.
Image Credit: Supplied

The group, which owns and operates The Aquila School and Nibras International School in Dubai, as well as Aspen Heights British School and Reach British School in Abu Dhabi, had launched the campaign on November 1 with a video featuring famous Emirati actor Saoud Al Kaabi.

Remember the times

In the campaign, parents are being asked to write letters to their children, sharing lessons that are important for them to remember when they are older, or telling them a story about what happened during this time. Students are writing letters to their future self, reminding of how they coped with schools switching to distance learning and not being able to see their friends and teachers at school. The teachers are also participating in the campaign by writing letters to their students, sharing their experience and the resilience they have shown during the lockdown.

‘Writing can be a powerful tool’

“We know that writing can be a powerful tool that helps us to reflect and raise our self-awareness. So by writing these letters that are meant to highlight lessons learnt during this time, we are ultimately asking our community to write about their own experience and resilience. Then by sharing the letters, the community is able to come together and celebrate each other’s strength and courage. We want our communities to become stronger from the experience and celebrate how they overcame their struggles,” said Mansukhani.

“We’ve had a hundreds of letters come in so far. Each letter is filled with emotion. Some letters, especially those from parents, haven’t necessarily spoken about COVID-19 or the lockdown, but they are definitely providing some great words of wisdom and lessons for the future.”

ISP schools globally are now looking to launch this initiative, which could also be extended to the rest of the UAE.

Some of the letters:

‘The world had time to heal’

Aspen - Miss Manica-1607146113575
Miss Manica, Teacher, Aspen Heights British School
Image Credit: Supplied

During lockdown I learnt so much and especially how to encourage others. No matter how rough the days were, I knew I had a lot to be grateful for.

I learnt more about myself, my friends, my family, the world and I learnt more to help me be a better teacher.

I found how strong I could be. I found not being able to leave my house and see people that I wanted to, very difficult but I tried to focus on the positive things. Having more time to call people and have zoom fun events like quizzes and bingo was awesome.

Calling friends all over the world to catch up was amazing, as I usually I don’t have time for that.

I enjoyed sorting out my apartment and being more creative with the space I live in.

I did lots of educational courses too and attended virtual conferences.

One of the best things about lockdown was how the world had time to heal. There was no litter, animals could roam free and feel safe too.

I had many opportunities to encourage and motivate people who were having bad days, cheering them up and laughing too.

During lockdown I set goals for myself and had more time to think about what makes me happy.

I am inspired to make the most of each day and have a happy life, helping others and being the best me I could be.

No matter how bad your day is, there will always be a sunset to end the day and give you hope that a new day will come tomorrow. A new opportunity to achieve, be kind, help and inspire others.

Never forget how important you are, everyone is special!

(Teacher, Aspen Heights British School)

‘We enjoyed every moment spent with you’

NIS - D'Souza family-1607146119142
The D’Sousa family
Image Credit: Supplied

The pandemic is something unexpected and the whole world was not ready for it. Who would have thought that we would see a day that we will be stuck at home for almost three months? Wearing masks, gloves, no access to the play area, no eating outside, no playdates; it is all too much.

Learning online was a challenge but we admired how you have shown your resilience and have shown all your effort and enthusiasm despite the difficulty we faced. This allowed us to spend more time with you and realised all the little things that we have to be thankful for. We had breakfast together, did different exercises, cooked, painted, and enjoyed every moment spent with you.

Working from home was also challenging for us as the nature of both our work as sales managers require us to meet clients face to face. However, this did not stop us from working! This lockdown made us think of innovative ways to reach out to our clients while working from home. We held online events, set-up googles meetings online, and have utilized our time more efficiently.

If there is one thing we would like you to know in life, nothing is certain and change is permanent. We would like you to know that you have faced one of the most difficult times in the world and have been able to adjust yourself. The right attitude and willingness to learn and adapt to any situation is a life lesson you should keep and hopefully, you will be able to pass it to your children as well.

We love you and always be here for you no matter what.

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Headlines UK

Porn baron says estranged wife stole his mail as he denies ignoring letters about driving offences 


The 7th Baron Feversham, 52-year-old Jasper Orlando Slingsby Duncombe, was accused of driving his blue two-litre Audi without reasonable consideration

An aristocrat nicknamed The Porn Baron today claimed his estranged wife has been stealing his mail in the midst of an acrimonious divorce – as he defended himself against ignoring traffic prosecution letters.

The 7th Baron Feversham, 52-year-old Jasper Orlando Slingsby Duncombe, was accused of driving his blue two-litre Audi without reasonable consideration.

Two letters asking him to identify the driver of the car, which was caught on camera at the junction of Fulham Road and Parsons Green Lane at 3.05pm on November 30, last year, were posted to his home in Chippenham, Wiltshire. 

Duncombe told Lavender Hill Magistrates’ Court he did not receive the letters and suspects his wife stole them from his outside mailbox.

He thinks she took them while he was visiting his new girlfriend Emma at her home in Minorca, Spain. 

He wore a smart dark blue suit, light blue shirt and dark blue tie as he addressed the court via video link, saying: ‘Her solicitors have not found the sort of money they think I have.

‘She is extremely angry because she is not receiving the sums she believes she deserves and has been seeking financial information.’

He is the eldest son of the late Peter Duncombe, 6th Baron Feversham, and was educated, along with Prince Edward, at Gordonstoun.

Jasper Duncombe is the eldest son of the late Peter Duncombe, 6th Baron Feversham (pictured on his wedding day)

Jasper Duncombe is the eldest son of the late Peter Duncombe, 6th Baron Feversham (pictured on his wedding day)

He is the eldest son of the late Peter Duncombe, 6th Baron Feversham, and was educated, along with Prince Edward, at Gordonstoun (pictured: Baron Feversham's home)

He is the eldest son of the late Peter Duncombe, 6th Baron Feversham, and was educated, along with Prince Edward, at Gordonstoun (pictured: Baron Feversham’s home) 

The Baron founded pornographic film companies ‘Tongue in Cheek’ and ‘Relish XXX,’ which sells movies to NHS fertility clinics and private sperm banks, including titles such as ‘To The Manor Porn.’

He was disinherited from his late father’s £46million estate because of the elder Baron’s disapproval of his porn empire. When his father died on March 29, 2009, the will was split amongst his widow and three other children.

The 7th Baron, who has two sons, split-up with his wife in early Summer last year and received a divorce petition last November.

‘It has been very acrimonious. For example she tried to stop me seeing my children, restricting me to just twelve days a year.

‘I took her to court very successfully and now see my children for seventy per cent of the half-term.’ The Baron also has fortnightly custody every other Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

The Baron became suspicious when a letter sent from his City broker was not in his mailbox after returning from Minorca on January 18 this year.

Duncombe told Lavender Hill Magistrates Court he did not receive the letters and suspects his wife stole them from his outside mailbox

Duncombe told Lavender Hill Magistrates Court he did not receive the letters and suspects his wife stole them from his outside mailbox

‘They said they sent it, but I could not find it and there are one or two items like that, that have gone missing.’

Confessing he has six points on his driving licence for speeding on the M4 the Baron said it would make no sense to ignore the Single Justice Procedure notices because that would result in an automatic ban.

‘I would have said I was the driver, because nobody else drives my car. If you don’t respond you get six points, which means I get automatically banned.

‘By throwing it in the bin I would automatically lose my licence. Why would I do that?

‘I’d be effectively throwing my licence in the bin, it would be crazy. It is not something I would do.

‘I get my bank statements digitally now and if I am away for a few days my neighbour takes the post in.’

On his ‘really nasty’ divorce, he said: ‘Things did not start getting really nasty until Christmas just gone by. This has been very nasty for nine or ten months now.

‘I am suspicious things started when I began dating Emma, who lives in Minorca.

‘It is fairly recent things have got unpleasant and the opportunity to pilfer my mail would have been fairly limited until I began flying to Minorca.’

It was the disappearance of his letter from wealth management firm Canaccord that convinced the Baron his wife was stealing his post.

‘I thought: “Hang on, there’s something going on here.” The Royal Mail loses the items, but there was more, anything that looked official, like a council tax reminder.

‘That letter from my broker, that was when my arm bell rang and I thought: “Someone’s taking my post”.

‘What is unusual here is the mail goes into a mailbox and you can get in there and get stuff out.

‘If there was a magazine there the postman would just prop those up in the porch.’

Bench Chairwoman Laura Boyle announced she and her fellow-magistrate were split 50/50 on the case and ordered a re-trial.

‘Unfortunately were are a split bench as a two, so we are unable to reach a decision. This will have to be adjourned to another occasion in front of another bench.’

Prosecutor Mr. Alex Alawode told the court in the circumstances the CPS would discontinue the case rather than have a re-trial. ‘It is not in the public interest.’

The court then formally found the Baron not guilty.

Earlier the prosecutor said two notices were sent to the cottage in December last year and January via First Class post.

The Baron eventually wrote back claiming he never received them, saying: ‘I am in the midst of very messy divorce and believe my wife has been removing letters for financial information.

‘My outside mailbox is easily pilfered.’ 

In 1993 he was sentenced to three years imprisonment for an attempted robbery while high on cocaine.

The original offence of driving without consideration will not be continued.

His lawyer, Mr. Simon Nicholls, urged the court to find his client not guilty due to the 50/50 split.

He said it made no sense for the Baron to ignore the notices. ‘If you do not reply there is a fine of up to a thousand pounds and six penalty points.

‘You would have to be a complete idiot, if I can put it colloquially. This would put him in danger for totting-up disqualification.’



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Glasgow Headlines UK

BBC sends elderly ‘threatening’ licence fee letters warning of fine


The BBC has been accused of ‘terrifying’ the elderly with ‘threatening’ licence fee letters warning viewers of a £1,000 fine if they do not pay the £157.50-a-year cost.

Social media users complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients they could face prosecution.

The letter reads: ‘Our records show your property has no TV licence. I visited today, to find out why.

‘You have not replied to our letters. So my visit today was the next stage of the official investigation into why your address doesn’t have a TV licence.’ 

The letter, emblazoned with red capital letters, reads: ‘Our records show your property has no TV licence. I visited today, to find out why’, before warning viewers of a £1,000 fine

The outside of the letter, reading 'please do not ignore' in red capital letters, in a picture posted to social media by engineer Britney, 28, from Glasgow

The outside of the letter, reading ‘please do not ignore’ in red capital letters, in a picture posted to social media by engineer Britney, 28, from Glasgow

It then goes on to detail the potential fines and prosecution the recipient could face.

Among those to complain was engineer ‘Britney Beers’, 28, who shared a picture of the letter on Twitter yesterday.

Britney, from Glasgow, owns a TV but says she does not watch BBC shows.

She uploaded her letter to social media and wrote: ‘Absolutely f***ing wild how threatening the TV licence letters are.’ 

Another Twitter user also posted: ‘My parents (88 years!) have just received your threatening letter demanding they set up a direct debit to pay their licence fee.

‘They are now highly stressed as they don’t know how to do this! I do hope you are proud of the stress you are causing our parents.’

A third added: ‘My elderly mother with dementia received her licence letter this morning. Petrified and in tears, worried sick about the fee. I am so not.’

A fourth person complained: They did this to my 64-year-old father, I had a pile of threatening BBC licence letters six inches high, nothing happened but it worried my father’.

And another added: ‘Thanks for sending a really threatening letter for cancelling my direct debit, even though my licence is paid for and valid until April 2021.

Social media users, above, complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients could face prosecution

Social media users, above, complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients could face prosecution

‘There’s thousands of people losing their jobs at the moment.’

Speaking today, Britney said: ‘I don’t like answering the door to people I don’t know or not expecting if I’m in on my own. The man knocked and then posted that through the door. It’s also intimidating. 

‘I was surprised at how threatening it is, I didn’t expect them to be as demanding as that and since the recent change making pensioners pay for it, it would scare them. It’s so threatening.’

If enquiry officers suspect that BBC or iPlayer programmes are being watched without a licence fee, they may pay a visit to your home.

They cannot enter the premises, but may apply for a search warrant in order to do so.

On Sunday, it was revealed that the company responsible for collecting the licence fee made an embarrassing mistake that allowed hundreds of elderly people to pay a weekly direct debit. 

Capita (offices pictured) allowed hundreds to sign up for a weekly direct debit, before having to scrap system so anyone over 75 not paying won't have their licence cancelled (file photo)

Capita (offices pictured) allowed hundreds to sign up for a weekly direct debit, before having to scrap system so anyone over 75 not paying won’t have their licence cancelled (file photo)

Capita allowed hundreds of over 75s to sign up for this service, only for them to realise you cannot have weekly direct debits because of their automatic cancellation system.

The system had to be scrapped so anyone over the age of 75 who isn’t paying will not have their licence cancelled.

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘These letters have no connection to changes made to free licences for over 75s, they have not been sent to any older customers and TV Licensing will not be making visits to them while these changes are rolled out.

‘For people not in this group, we make no apology for reminding them they must pay the licence fee.’

A spokeswoman for TV Licensing said: ‘The majority of people pay their TV licence on a regular basis, however, there will always be some who need to be reminded.

‘Where no response is received to repeated letters, it is important to let households know the consequences of evasion.

‘Letters sent become progressively stronger in tone, depending on whether people respond to enquiries or not. TV Licensing does its best not to trouble genuine non-viewers, but we have a duty to enforce the law.’ 



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Race against time to find family of WW1 soldier who wrote ‘heartbreaking’ letters home from trenches


A desperate race against time is underway to find relatives of a First World War hero before his medals and ‘heartbreaking’ letters home from the trenches are auctioned off near Remembrance Sunday.

More than 100 years after Sgt Sam Atherton wrote to his parents from France, the young soldier’s letters and medals were found stored in Wolverhampton in March.

One letter from the young solder reads: ‘You are the best mother a lad could have and if by God’s help I live through this war, I will repay you by all the help I can give you. Good night and God bless you all.’ 

Having served in France for 18 months, Sam was killed in battle in 1917, aged 21.

Prior to his death he was awarded the 1914/15 Star, the War Medal and the Victory Medal, collectively known as as the World War One trio.  

Fieldings Auctioneers Ltd is now working hard to make a deal with Sam’s closest relative and the vendor who found the historic items, before an auction on November 12.

‘Heartbreaking’ letters written home from the trenches by Sam Atherton, along with a World War One trio of medals are set to be auctioned off next month – unless relatives come forward

First World War hero Sam Atherton’s service  

Bolton-born Sam Atherton served in the Manchester Regiment Machine Gun Corps for 18 months from 1915-1917 in the First World War.

Sam Atherton died while serving in France in 1917, he was 21

Sam Atherton died while serving in France in 1917, he was 21

Sam’s letters home to his mother and father reveal the horrifying conditions he and his fell soldiers lived in as they fought in what was known as The Great War. 

Despite his age, Sam’s gallant service saw him awarded the 1914/15 Star, the War Medal and the Victory Medal, collectively known as World War One Trio.

In the summer of 1916 the young sergeant suffered wounds which he recovered from, only to be killed in battle in January 1917, aged 21.

He is buried at the British Cemetery north of the French town of Albert. 

The medals are set to go up for auction on November 12 and any sales fee will be donated to Hope For Heroes charity.  

In his letters home, Sam revealed the state of life in the trenches, while also thanking his parents for items they were able to send.  

In a letter penned on Christmas Day 1915, he jokes about having stew for dinner again.

His letter reads: ‘Stew for a change you know. Oh well never mind, it will all be over some day won’t it?’

In a particularly emotional message, he wrote: ‘If I happen to snuff it, which I hope I don’t, you will always be able to look on me as a good lad. 

‘I have never done anyone any harm, I used to stay out late, I know father and you worry, but I did nothing wrong.’ 

On another occasion, he shared some of the isolation he felt while serving overseas.

He wrote: ‘I was left on my own in the bedroom and I felt very lonely.

‘I can tell you I thought about all of you and pictured you all sat around the fire.’

Each letter is signed of ‘your loving son,’ and is littered with xes. 

Before he joined the service, Sam worked in the card room at the Arrow Mill in Castleton.

Sam and his family were known around Bolton, and he also played for the local Wesleyan cricket team.

Signing up in 1914, Sam served in Manchester Regiment Machine Gun Corps.

He recovered from wounds in the summer of 1916, only to die in January 1917. 

The letters were described as ‘horrific,’ by the auctioneers, who read each one after the discovery was brought to them in March. 

Fieldings’ head of business development Rachel Holland said the team were left in tears after reading through Sam’s letters home.

She said: ‘They are quite hard to read but we have sat and ready every single one of them and they are, I have to say, absolutely heartbreaking. 

‘Talking to his mother and father about how he’s a good lad and he loves them and wishes he was coming home.

‘How he is sitting there, writing them by candlelight with rats at his feet, talking about time in the trenches. It’s a pretty horrific read to be honest with you.

'Loving son,' Sam Atherton wrote letters home to his parents, in which he spoke of having stew on Christmas Day and picturing his family sat beside the fire at home

‘Loving son,’ Sam Atherton wrote letters home to his parents, in which he spoke of having stew on Christmas Day and picturing his family sat beside the fire at home 

‘We sell World War One trio medals, thousands of them a year probably but this is just different because you very rarely get background information of who that person was, that’s what makes it interesting.

‘They are so poignant – we were all in tears reading these letters – they are incredible.

‘During the time we are all in at the moment it is a difficult time and we are all struggling not to see family but then you put it in slight perspective, this young lad who was serving in war for two years, missing his mother and father and sisters.

‘It becomes a little bit different the way you look at things and hence where we are as auctioneers, we felt these should be with members of the family or distant relatives, they have been saved from a lockup in Wolverhampton and they should be with ancestors.

Fieldings' head of business development Rachel Holland said Sam's letters reveal the tragic conditions soldiers lived in while fighting in the trenches

Fieldings’ head of business development Rachel Holland said Sam’s letters reveal the tragic conditions soldiers lived in while fighting in the trenches 

Are you related to Sam Atherton?

Contact [email protected] 

‘We believe these are really, really special items. 

‘We see medals every day in our careers but you couple these with these very poignant letters and during the current times they take on a different light.’

Rachel says Fieldings has already been inundated with inquiries from people who might be connected to the medals.

She added: ‘We are not there yet but we have some very interesting leads.

‘You wouldn’t believe the response to this, I think it has really touched a nerve with everyone and we have had lots of genealogists offering to help find information but we are still searching for a closest relative to this person, so the search still continues.’



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Lisa Armstrong calls the police after love letters from Ant McPartlin were stolen


Lisa Armstrong calls the police after love letters from ex-husband Ant McPartlin were stolen from a skip outside their former marital home

Lisa Armstrong has reportedly contacted the police after items from her and ex-husband Ant McPartlin’s marriage were stolen from outside her former marital home.

The make-up artist, 43, is said to have discovered a Valentine’s Card from Ant was taken from a skip that was placed outside. 

According to a report from The Mirror on Thursday, Lisa contacted officers after she realised the notes were taken, as well as a document of the seating arrangements at their wedding in 2006, and one of Ant’s personalised dressing gowns.

Incident: Lisa Armstrong called the police after love letters from ex-husband Ant McPartlin were stolen from a skip outside their former marital home, it was reported on Thursday

A spokesperson from the Metropolitan Police told MailOnline: ‘Police were called at 13:29hrs on Thursday, 17 September to reports of a burglary in West London. 

‘It was reported that a number of items were stolen from a skip outside the property. Officers carried out enquiries. No suspects were identified. 

‘The investigation has been closed. If any further investigative or evidential opportunities are established this will be reviewed.’

MailOnline has contacted Lisa’s representatives for comment.

Theft: A Valentine's Card from Ant to Lisa, as well as a document of the seating arrangements at their wedding, and one of Ant's personalised dressing gowns is said to have been taken

Theft: A Valentine’s Card from Ant to Lisa, as well as a document of the seating arrangements at their wedding, and one of Ant’s personalised dressing gowns is said to have been taken

Earlier this month, Lisa was seen taking the final steps in her split from Ant as her belongings were removed from their £5 million former marital home.

Removals men were seen taking a plethora of items out of the house, including artwork, a sofa and a Power Plate Pro5 Vibration Plate, costing £1,195. 

Last week, the make-up artist, who has resumed work on Strictly Come Dancing and just released a cosmetics line, made a bold statement as she left her famous ex-husband’s unwanted possessions on the pavement for passers-by to take.  

Lisa split from Ant in 2018 after 12 years of marriage, and is now reported to be dating James Green. Lisa and Ant, who is now dating Anne-Marie Corbett, finalised their £62million divorce back in April after their split in January 2018. 

All over:

All over: Lisa and Ant finalised their divorce back in April after their split in January 2018, and her belongings were removed from their £5 million former marital home earlier this month

Lisa, who received £31 million in her divorce settlement from Ant, was clearing out the home of all beloved possessions, including her gym equipment. 

In another stage of her moving process, she put goods in boxes marked ‘help yourself’ and put them outside her west London property as she prepares to move out of the marital home she formerly shared with her ex.

The items were easily identifiable as Ant’s because they included his Newcastle United shirts and a ‘Team Ant’ foam hand from Saturday Night Takeaway. There was also Ant’s old dressing gown and a pile of board games. 

No longer needed was Piers Morgan’s book The Insider and Lisa threw in her own Craig Revel Horwood’s Tales from the Dance Floor. 

She was also throwing out a bowl used by their beloved Labrador, Hurley, as well as a Banksy artwork calendar and a Jamie Oliver book. 

A source told The Sun Lisa is leaving her West London house and wanted a ‘big clear out.’ They added: ‘Ant had already sifted through what he wanted to keep and had gophers collect them in recent weeks. 

‘What was left is being offered for free. His bathrobe has been taken. Footie memorabilia has also been given away. But it was the end for his Newcastle shirts.’

Moving on: Ant is now in a relationship with Anne-Marie Corbett, and the pair are often seen out and about together. Pictured this month

Moving on: Ant is now in a relationship with Anne-Marie Corbett, and the pair are often seen out and about together. Pictured this month



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Lisa Armstrong calls police over ‘theft’ of Ant McPartlin love letters from skip


Ant McPartlin’s ex-wife called the police and alleged that letters they gave to each other had been stolen.

Lisa Armstrong, 43, contacted officers after the notes and other belongings were taken from a skip outside the home the pair had shared.

The items reportedly included a Valentine’s Day card from TV presenter Ant to Lisa.

A document with seating arrangements for their wedding in 2006 was also taken, as was Ant’s personalised dressing gown from a celeb golf event. A newspaper previously claimed the man with the items had permission to go through the skip outside the £5million property in West London.

But make-up artist Lisa claimed otherwise.

Lisa Armstrong says letters between her and ex-husband Ant McPartlin were stolen from a skip outside her home

Scotland Yard said: “Police were called on Thursday, 17 September to reports of a burglary. It was reported that a number of items were stolen from a skip outside the property.

“Officers carr-ied out inquiries. No suspects were identified. The investigation has been closed.

“If any further investigative opportunities are established this will be reviewed.”

Lisa Armstrong called the police about the ‘theft’

Lisa told police that the belongings were taken from a skip outside her home

It has been claimed Lisa previously left books in boxes in the street with a sign saying “Help yourself”.

She said this week she recently moved out of the home and is living in a hotel while her new pad is refurbished.

Ant, 44, is now with Anne-Marie Corbett, 43, after he and Lisa divorced last year.

Do you have a story to sell? Get in touch with us at [email protected] or call us direct 0207 29 33033.





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