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Donald Trump Halts Deportation Of Venezuelans For 18 Months


Donald Trump signed an order suspending the deportation of Venezuelans from US for 18 months

Washington:

On his last night in the White House, outgoing President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday suspending the deportation of Venezuelans from US territory for a period of 18 months, citing the ongoing crisis in their own country.

“I have determined that it is in the foreign policy interest of the United States to defer the removal of any national of Venezuela, or alien without nationality who last habitually resided in Venezuela,” for 18 months, the executive ordered signed by Trump said.

The move had been pushed by the president’s Republican allies in Florida, where many Venezuelans have settled after fleeing the economic collapse and political turmoil in their native country, ruled for more than two decades by a socialist regime.

Newsbeep

The Miami Herald said the order could aid up to 200,000 Venezuelans who live under threat of detention and deportation.

(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)



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Canada

Indiana family faces deportation for having too many children

An American family in Schererville, northern Indiana, is at risk of being evicted from their home for having too many children.

The couple with two children took possession of the premises in 2017 with a lease stipulating that a maximum of two people could sleep in each of the two bedrooms of the condo.

However, the family has grown in the meantime with two more babies and is threatened with eviction, despite being up to date with the rent payment.

These are the two babies who put the family in violation of the terms of the lease, CBS reported Wednesday.

“The police have never been here. I didn’t do anything wrong, apart from having two more babies, ”mother Deborah Rangel told American media.

Rangel’s family has been given a one-month deadline, who lost their jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic that did not spare Indiana.

This US state did not extend the moratorium on evictions despite the health crisis.

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Headlines UK

UK backpackers fear deportation after Sydney Christmas party

British backpackers could be deported from Australia after holding a Christmas Day beach party in defiance of Covid rules – amid a growing outbreak which has led to tougher restrictions in Sydney. 

Some revellers deleted their social media profiles after photos of the Bronte rave circulated online and were condemned by Australia’s immigration minister.

Witnesses said that many of the partygoers had English accents, some of them thought to be British backpackers who have stayed in Australia since the country closed its border because of the pandemic. 

New Zealand backpacker Tarik Kent, who went to the park behind Bronte Beach about 1pm on Christmas Day, said people had gradually congregated ‘as music played and people got drunker’.  

He said he left after a few hours but returned later in the day with other friends, and was shocked to see the park swarming with a crowd of revellers in Santa hats.

‘More and more people showed up by the minute,’ he said. ‘It was predominantly British and Irish. Apparently it’s a popular Irish spot during Christmas every year.’

New South Wales has recorded nearly 150 locally transmitted cases in the last fortnight, a high level of contagion for Australia. 

Immigration minister Alex Hawke said he was ‘shocked’ by people ‘flagrantly disregarding public health orders’ after hundreds of people gathered at the beach. 

‘You have to obey the orders though and if you don’t, you will be liable to face visa cancellation if you are a temporary visa holder,’ he told Sky News.  

One British woman at the party, Elisha Palfrey, sent this photo to her father showing the Christmas festivities at Bronte Beach which have angered Australians 

One UK father posted this photo of his daughter and her friends (right) and jokingly compared it to his cold Christmas at home

Christmas party: People wearing Santa hats enjoy a day of revelry at the Bronte seaside in Sydney, an event which has been condemned by the Australian government

Christmas party: People wearing Santa hats enjoy a day of revelry at the Bronte seaside in Sydney, an event which has been condemned by the Australian government 

Some of the revellers who spent Christmas Day in Bronte. Gatherings of up to 100 people were permitted in Sydney at the time, but there were many more than that in the park at the height of the festive revelry. Witnesses said that many of the partygoers had English accents, some of them thought to be British backpackers

Some of the revellers who spent Christmas Day in Bronte. Gatherings of up to 100 people were permitted in Sydney at the time, but there were many more than that in the park at the height of the festive revelry. Witnesses said that many of the partygoers had English accents, some of them thought to be British backpackers

Some people posted social media pictures of themselves attending a Christmas Day party in Sydney, which is now facing tougher restrictions after a rise in cases

Some people posted social media pictures of themselves attending a Christmas Day party in Sydney, which is now facing tougher restrictions after a rise in cases

New South Wales health minister Brad Hazzard said the behaviour of the partygoers was ‘absolutely appalling’ and could lead to a ‘super-spreader event’. 

‘People in the Northern Beaches have been doing their part big-time to keep not only themselves but the rest of Sydney safe,’ Hazzard said.

‘It is absolutely appalling to see what was clearly a group of people, a large gathering of people, who didn’t give a damn about the rest of Sydney.

He added: ‘If they were in Europe right now, most of them would be in lockdown and not even allowed outside the front door.’ 

Police from the New South Wales public order and riot squad were called to help break up the crowd in a grassed area in Bronte. 

While most of the partygoers were moved on by police, one 25-year-old man refused to leave and will face court in the new year.  

Australia’s border has been closed to most outsiders for months in order to keep out the virus – but some of the revellers are thought to be British backpackers who were already in the country and remained there during the pandemic. 

In normal times, young people from the UK are eligible for a 12-month ‘working holiday visa’ in Australia which can potentially be extended for up to three years. 

Witness: New Zealand backpacker Tarik Kent (pictured) said he left the park when it was quiet but within just a few hours people 'wearing Santa hats' began to flood into Bronte Beach

Witness: New Zealand backpacker Tarik Kent (pictured) said he left the park when it was quiet but within just a few hours people ‘wearing Santa hats’ began to flood into Bronte Beach

Police believe the event was not pre-planned, but rather a spur of the moment celebration that expanded as word spread and more foreigners were invited

Police believe the event was not pre-planned, but rather a spur of the moment celebration that expanded as word spread and more foreigners were invited

NSW Police believe the event was not pre-planned, but rather a spur of the moment celebration that expanded as word spread and more foreigners were invited.

One Sydney pub has ordered a staff member who was at the Bronte Beach party to get tested for Covid-19 and isolate while awaiting results.

But there was no sign of any such concerns on the day, with one woman even sending a photo of herself drinking and embracing friends back to her father in Britain – who then shared it on his own Facebook, telling followers how different things were in Australia to the UK

‘So this morning I’m taking a picture of snow and I get a picture from my daughter living it up on Bronte Beach, Sydney,’ he wrote.  

The party infuriated Sydney residents who fear it could lead to a spike in cases and another lockdown in the city.   

At the time of the gathering, up to 100 people were allowed to meet outdoors in greater Sydney, but there were believed to be more than that at the party and the limit has since been halved to 50. 

Similar scenes occurred on the beaches at the popular backpacking destination of Byron Bay on the NSW northern coast.

Photos showed hundreds of people gathering on Belongil Beach, north of the town, on Christmas Eve to dance and drink as a DJ played. 

Police were called to disperse the large crowd

Social distancing was non-existent at the gathering

Social distancing was non-existent at Bronte as crowds danced closely together 

Australia's immigration minister  said he was 'shocked' by people 'flagrantly disregarding public health orders' after hundreds of people gathered at the beachside park

Australia’s immigration minister  said he was ‘shocked’ by people ‘flagrantly disregarding public health orders’ after hundreds of people gathered at the beachside park

Anger over the Christmas raves came as Sydney recorded 18 new locally transmitted cases in 24 hours, a high number for Australia which has led to restrictions on New Year’s Eve gatherings.   

Six cases, all from one extended family, were connected to the same area of Croydon, while nine were linked to a Northern Beaches cluster and other cases in Wollongong and northern Sydney are under investigation.

The new local cases have prompted the NSW government to limit indoor New Year’s Eve gatherings across all of greater Sydney to five people. The Sydney foreshore has already been closed off to firework watchers.

Chief Medical Officer Paul Kelly said he supported the measure and believed NSW Health would squash the outbreak.

‘NSW Health right throughout this pandemic have been our poster people, if you like, in relation to their contact tracing,’ Dr Kelly told reporters on Wednesday.

‘It’s always amazing how quickly they get onto things and how quickly they work through what are sometimes very complex chains of transmission and get very detailed genomic analysis.’

The Northern Territory on Wednesday also barred residents from Sydney suburbs including Croydon, Strathfield and Sutherland from entry.

Meanwhile, the first case in Australia of the South African Covid-19 variant is a woman who arrived in Queensland on December 22. She was transferred to a hospital on Tuesday.

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Headline USA New York

Lawyers Warn Danger of Deportation of Minors Without Parents in the US The State

The unaccompanied minors They face a new challenge, after their lawyers are receiving notifications from the courts to present evidence on their clients within 30 days or they will be deported.

The number of court subpoenas has been on the rise in a crusade that advocates call unusual, according to a report by Gothamist.

“The immediate concern is that if we don’t file something with the immigration court, the court will find them deportable.”Immigration lawyer Alexandra Rizio warned the portal.

He added that this means that, at any time, Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers (ICE) could search for these minors for removal from the United States.

The expert is part of the Safe Passage Project, a non-profit organization in New York that represents about 1,200 unaccompanied minors.

These children or adolescents came to the United States fleeing violence or economic crises in their countries, but they came to the nation without a guardian or parent.

There are different processes for these cases, such as applying for asylum or obtaining immigration protection if they show that they were abused or abandoned by their parents, but both cases take years.

The expert told the portal that the requests for tests occurred in cases postponed in court due to the coronavirus pandemic, in addition to the fact that the letters have a very similar wording.

Gotamist cites organizations in other parts of the country, such as Massachusetts, that also received the notifications.

Anthony Enriquez, who runs the unaccompanied minors program at Catholic Charities Community Services in New York, said the petitions generate additional complicated paperwork for the defense, to the detriment of minors.

He warns that this means that due to time, they would not be able to bring the complex cases to court on behalf of the minors, who could be deported.

The Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR), which administers the immigration courts of the Department of Justice, did not explain why it is sending these extra requests.

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Categories
Canada

Jail and deportation for a child rapist

A Montrealer who took advantage of a family’s trust to rape their 7-year-old daughter in the garage of the family home was sentenced to six years in prison on Wednesday, after which he was deported from Canada.

“It is a person that we invited to our home, we trusted him, we did him a service … he projected the image of a good person while he is a bad human being,” testified the great sister of the victim of Marcel Casseus, Wednesday at the Montreal courthouse.

Casseus, 66, is a Haitian asylum seeker who, over the years, has gained the trust of a Montreal family. Alone in Quebec, he sometimes took care of the children, when the parents had to be away. However, last July, he betrayed this trust.

“The victim went to the garage to get a bag of crisps,” Crown prosecutor, Mr.e Jérôme Laflamme. She noticed the accused’s presence when he grabbed her, pulled her and knocked her down. “

Quickly, Casseus pulled down her pants to sexually assault the girl who, in fear, did not dare to react. It was her 14-year-old older sister who discovered the scene while looking for the little one. Quickly, she went to tell their working mother.

” Shocked “

“Shaken, the teenager then went to throw up,” said the Crown. The victim, in shock, could not speak. “

Later, she will tell her big sister “that because of what happened, [elle] has become an adult, ”the latter explained to the court on Wednesday.

Casseus, meanwhile, was on the run for three days. He finally pleaded guilty to sexual interference on Wednesday.

“My little sister was 7 … to think about it, it’s unbearable, unlivable,” the victim’s older sister testified on Wednesday. We are working to get over it, but it’s difficult. This trusted person did a heinous act. “

Judge Pierre Labelle added, speaking of “despicable” and “highly reprehensible” gestures and that “the message had to be” conveyed that attacking children will always be severely punished, “he said.

At the suggestion of lawyers, he sentenced Casseus to six years in prison, in addition to entering him on the sex offender registry for 20 years.

Once his sentence has been served and because of his status in Canada, Casseus will then be deported to his native Haiti.

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Headlines UK

Home Office in new deportation row as lawyers seek to block removal of Channel migrants

Judges’ powers to block deportations could be limited as Justice Secretary Robert Buckland announces first review of Human Rights Act in 20 years

  • Robert Buckland said the review would look at key areas of the Human Rights Act
  • Includes whether judges’ interpretations of old legal decisions should be limited
  • Critics claim focusing on old cases can lead to ‘gold-plating’ human rights duties
  • Will also establish whether judges have been ‘unduly drawn’ into policy and law

Judges’ powers to block deportations of serious criminals could be limited as Justice Secretary Robert Buckland announces a review of the Human Rights Act.

Mr Buckland said the review would look at several key areas – including whether judges have been ‘unduly drawn’ into Government policy and law.

Another area of the review will establish whether judges’ interpretations of past legal decisions in European case law should be limited when looking at current cases.

Critics have claimed focusing on old cases can lead to ‘gold-plating’ the country’s current human rights duties.

A separate review of asylum will look at reducing the number of people using Article 3 of the Human Rights act – freedom from torture and inhuman or degrading treatment.

Judges’ powers to block deportations of serious criminals could be limited as Justice Secretary Robert Buckland (pictured) announces a review of the Human Rights Act

This would prevent foreign criminals from making false claims about their treatment in their home country – and could see hundreds more deportations per year. 

Writing in The Daily Telegraph Mr Buckland said: ‘The Human Rights Act (HRA) was enacted to give further domestic effect to the protections in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR), thereby reducing the need for people in the UK to take their cases to the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg.’

He added: ‘The legislature frequently updates Acts and now is the right time to take a fresh look at the Human Rights Act, see how its provisions are operating and consider whether the framework could be improved.’ 

Last week the Home Office was blocked from deporting 23 serious criminals to Jamaica after 11th-hour legal challenges backed by Labour MPs and celebrities.

But ministers insist the review – lead by former court of appeal judge Sir Peter Gross – has not come off the back of any particular cases and is instead a broader examination of the act.

The ‘options’ for alterations collated by the committee will be released next summer.

A man is helped by a Border Force officer as a group of people thought to be migrants are brought in to Dover last month

A man is helped by a Border Force officer as a group of people thought to be migrants are brought in to Dover last month

Mr Buckland added: ‘The legislature frequently updates Acts and now is the right time to take a fresh look at the Human Rights Act, see how its provisions are operating and consider whether the framework could be improved.’

Mr Buckland said that as it stands, the Human Rights Act allows domestic courts to ‘in effect, rewrite Acts of Parliament to ensure that they comply with the ECHR’.

He added: ‘It is surely worth asking whether, and if so how, such important and controversial decisions over how to change the law should be returned to Parliament.’ 

It comes as the Home Office faces a fresh deportation row as lawyers seek to block the removal of Channel migrants.

Migrants from countries including Sudan are due to be flown to Germany, Spain and France on four charter flights. 

Under EU rules migrants who have already claimed refugee status in another EU country can be returned there.

But campaigners say they include suspected victims of trafficking and forced labour. 

Sarah Teather, director of Jesuit Refugee Service UK, has accused the Government of ‘a complete disregard for human life’ and of ‘rushing’ ahead with the removals ahead of Brexit.

Last week the Home Office was blocked from deporting 23 serious criminals to Jamaica after an 11th-hour legal challenges

Last week the Home Office was blocked from deporting 23 serious criminals to Jamaica after an 11th-hour legal challenges

Lawyers acting for the asylum seekers set to be deported this week say they have not been asked two key questions – ‘Why have you come to the UK?’ and ‘Please outline your journey to the UK’ – which are intended to identify vulnerabilities.

An interim high court ruling last month ordered the Home Office to reinstate the two questions, The Observer reported.

A Home Office spokesman said: ‘All individuals due to be removed have or will have been through a screening interview, which includes updated questions on trafficking, prior to removal. To suggest otherwise is inaccurate.’

Categories
California Headline USA Los Angeles

Immigrant Detained at Greyhound Bus Stop “Because of His Latino Appearance” Escape from Deportation The State

On January 11, 2018, Edgar solano, a Hispanic immigrant residing in California, had to go to a bus stop to return from work after his car broke down.

While standing in line at the terminal Greyhound In the town of Indio, in the Coachella Valley, he was approached by plainclothes federal agents, asked some questions, and shortly thereafter handcuffed and taken to an immigration detention center.

Solano was placed under deportation proceedings and in that bitterness almost three years passed, until this week, when a Los Angeles immigration court concluded that the Customs and Border Protection officers (CBP) who arrested him in 2018 based on “his Latino appearance” and thus proceeded illegally.

The court, which ordered the deportation proceedings against Solano to end, said in its ruling that, before he was detained, the officers “only knew his name, his place of residence and his appearance”, but that “they did not they are appropriate factors to establish the requirement of reasonable suspicion ”.

The ruling was issued by the Executive Office for the Review of Immigration Cases, the body where the decisions of the immigration courts are appealed, and a body dependent on the Department of Justice.

“A reasonable CBP officer should have known that he or she was violating the Fourth Amendment [de la Constitución, que protege a las personas contra detenciones arbitrarias] by stopping him solely on the basis of his Latino appearance, “reads the ruling, obtained by NBC News.

[Fue “violada” por un guardia de prisión que le dijo que nadie le creería por ser inmigrante. Terminó deportada]

CBP has not commented on the ruling or responded to NBC News requests for comment on the case.

More than two months in a detention center

On the day of his arrest, Solano, who resides in Los Angeles, was doing repair work in Indio. Because his car was not running, he decided to take the 9:25 p.m. Greyhound bus. Back to Los Angeles from Indio. The bus was more than an hour late.

When he finally arrived, Solano was in line to board when two plainclothes men approached him and asked for his name and address.

Solano answered them, but the men, who did not identify themselves, asked him to show identification, according to court documents. He replied that he preferred not to, because if he was late he would miss the last bus of the night to return home.

One of the men ordered him to get out of line, took his arm and led him to an unidentified van, While the other man indicated to the bus that he could leave without him, according to Solano’s lawyers.

According to the Civil Liberties Union (ACLU)Only when he was taken to the van with handcuffs on did the men identify themselves as immigration agents. By then, agents had already violated the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution and other regulations, the ACLU said.

A series of court rulings in the past have held that immigration officers cannot detain a person without reasonable suspicion based on facts, and the courts have found consensus that suspicion cannot be based simply on ethnicity.

When questioned by agents that night in Indio, Solano admitted that he had no documents authorizing his presence in the United States. He was arrested and spent more than two months in a detention center before obtaining a bail hearing, which his family paid for.

[Este menor fue deportado sin poder pedir asilo. Ahora un juez pone en duda expulsiones así durante la pandemia]

ACLU attorney Eva Bitrán, who represented him along with the Lucas & Barba LLP law firm, said this Friday: “As the Court correctly concluded, Mr. Solano’s arrest based on racial profiling was an outrageous violation of his constitutional rights ”.

“We know, however, that such arrests are common practice. We hope today’s decision serves as a warning to federal immigration officials that their illegal practices will not prevail, ”he continued.

The ACLU told Noticias Telemundo that Solano has decided not to comment to the media about his process.

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Categories
Headlines UK Liverpool London

Lawyer’s joy after halting Jamaican deportation

Champagne corks must have been popping in the offices of a number of law firms this week. The celebratory mood was epitomised perhaps by the first three words of a tweet from one law firm in the small hours of Wednesday. The three words in question were: ‘What a result.’

It was the kind of reaction you would expect from, say, the scientists responsible for the vaccine breakthroughs.

In fact, the lawyer, whose firm is based in the heart of London’s legal establishment, had just succeeded in obtaining an injunction to prevent ‘our Jamaican client’ being kicked out of the country.

Priti Patel, pictured, was disappointed this week after ‘lefty lawyers’ foiled her attempts to deport a group of Jamaican criminals on a specially-chartered aircraft

His ‘client’, whose precise offence is not known, was among the band of criminals — including murderers, rapists and drug dealers — removed from a deportation flight to the Caribbean following last-minute legal challenges. Surely no one apart from the ‘Leftie lawyers’ (Home Secretary Priti Patel’s description) making a handsome living out this kind of work and the individuals they represented on that plane would regard what happened as a victory.

The lawyer’s tweet in full read: ‘What a result, fresh reps [representations] submitted for our Jamaican client.

‘Reps submitted at 23.30 and then an out of hours injunction granted at 00.45. Close call but was taken off the flight.’

It was posted under the hashtag #Jamaica 50 — a reference to the fact that only 13 criminals from the original list of 57 were on board the Home Office charter plane which took off from Stansted Airport.

At least the lawyer himself was acting pro bono — for free. And his client — a Jamaican national and father of five who served time for ‘substance abuse’ — admittedly may not have been the most dangerous individual on the plane. The lawyer would not disclose the offence but says he was not a ‘drug dealer’ when we contacted him yesterday.

‘He served his sentence and has rehabilitated himself and became a family man,’ he said. ‘He has a British wife and kids here in the UK.’ Nevertheless, at a time of rising crime in an increasingly lawless Britain, many will find his tweet and the gleeful outpourings on social media of other lawyers at the heart of this controversy distasteful.

The lawyer who posted that late-night tweet did also concede that ‘there were some people on the flight who had been convicted of heinous crimes, which you cannot condone’.

Among the criminals Home Secretary Priti Patel sought to deport was Jermaine Stewart from Liverpool who was jailed in 2014 for raping a woman who fell asleep on his sofa

Among the criminals Home Secretary Priti Patel sought to deport was Jermaine Stewart from Liverpool who was jailed in 2014 for raping a woman who fell asleep on his sofa

But you could be forgiven for thinking they were all victims if you read some of their posts; victims of modern slavery — the defence now being used by drug dealers who claim they are being or have been exploited or trafficked by criminal gangs; victims of an authoritarian state which is breaking up families by kicking fathers out of the country and victims of a brutal policy that bears comparison with the Windrush scandal.

Take this from a barrister at a London chambers: ‘My client came to the UK aged 11 and is a victim of trafficking… his human rights claim has never been fully considered.’

Or this from a lawyer at a firm of solicitors: ‘Today many kids woke up not knowing if they’ll ever see their dads again and wondering why no one listens. Grateful that many got off the plane, but it was a brutal night. Very lucky to work with brilliant counsel team on this.’

On Tuesday afternoon, a charity that works closely with law firms even tweeted an ‘urgent callout’ for solicitors willing to challenge deportations on the basis that clients were unfit to fly because of factors such as ‘high blood pressure’.

Among those who were eventually given a reprieve, in case you were wondering, were Jermaine Stewart, from Liverpool, who was jailed for six years in 2014 for raping a woman who fell asleep on his sofa, and drug dealer Michael White — sentenced to a minimum of 18 years in 2003 — who, along with an accomplice, shot and killed a man they believed owed them money.

One of the biggest players in this legal field represented a number of people on the deportation flight (not Stewart or White) — one assumes through legal aid, although this cannot be confirmed.

The firm has received £55 million in legal aid from the British taxpayer in just three years — nearly £20 million for immigration cases. Its legal ‘successes’ include preventing the deportation of 14 serious offenders to Jamaica back in February.

This company is now Britain’s largest provider of legal aid services, employing 700 staff —‘legal practitioners representing clients in matters close to Labour’s heart’.

The firm denies being ‘Leftie lawyers’. ‘We are not politically motivated,’ a statement on the company website insists.

But staff regularly attend Labour Party events where their lawyers have been photographed with Jeremy Corbyn, ex-shadow chancellor John McDonnell, and MPs David Lammy, Yvette Cooper, shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth and Unite union boss ‘Red’ Len McCluskey.

In the past, staff have travelled to Calais and offered support to refugees hoping to reach Britain. Critics say the visits put the firm in pole position to represent those same migrants who may need help to remain in the UK if they successfully cross the Channel; the allegation, to be precise, is that they were drumming up business.

Campaigners have compared the Home Office's actions to the Empire Windrush scandal which saw people wrongly deported to the Caribbean because they could not prove they had a right to remain in the UK despite living in the country for up to 50 years

Campaigners have compared the Home Office’s actions to the Empire Windrush scandal which saw people wrongly deported to the Caribbean because they could not prove they had a right to remain in the UK despite living in the country for up to 50 years

Again, the firm addresses this criticism on its website: ‘Our work in Calais was entirely proper,’ the statement says. ‘In 2016 we sought to provide advice and support to unaccompanied children who were living in squalid conditions in the Calais migrant camp.

‘In two subsequent journeys to Calais in 2018 a small group of our employees travelled to help a charity called Refuge Community Kitchen. We certainly did not go to Calais to identify cases. We do not tout for work.’

It is understood that 36 Jamaican criminals were notified five days before the flight they would be deported and at that stage none had outstanding legal barriers to removal.

But a large number then submitted legal challenges. New claims included human rights appeals and allegations that criminals had been victims of slavery.

One was pulled off the flight just minutes before departure after his lawyers persuaded a judge to intervene.

Home Office sources claimed that the incident highlighted the ‘opportunistic’ tactics deployed by immigration lawyers.

Would anyone, apart from the lawyers themselves, disagree?

Additional reporting: Tim Stewart

Windrush victim daughter’s warns against linking scandal to deportation of Jamaican killers and rapists

By Emine Sinmaz and David Barrett for the Daily Mail

The daughter of a Windrush victim insisted last night that the scandal should not be linked to the deportation of Jamaican killers and rapists.

Samantha Barnes-Garner, whose elderly father Clayton Barnes was wrongly targeted by the Home Office, said the two issues were ‘completely different’.

The dance teacher, 50, insisted it was ‘absolutely’ right for the Government to deport criminals to their home countries.

Clayton Barnes, who was wrongly targeted by the Home Office, pictured, had spent 50 years living in Britain

Clayton Barnes, who was wrongly targeted by the Home Office, pictured, had spent 50 years living in Britain

His daughter, Samantha Barnes-Garner, pictured, said it was wrong to conflate her father's case with those of the criminals due for deportation this week

His daughter, Samantha Barnes-Garner, pictured, said it was wrong to conflate her father’s case with those of the criminals due for deportation this week

Her comments came after Home Secretary Priti Patel said in yesterday’s Daily Mail that it was ‘deeply offensive’ for Labour MPs and celebrities to ‘conflate’ the Windrush scandal with a charter flight this week that removed 13 Jamaican criminals.

Mr Barnes, now 84, was left stranded in Jamaica despite working in Britain for more than half a century. ‘It’s a completely different issue, the two of them shouldn’t be connected by no means,’ added Mrs Barnes-Garner.

‘In my father’s case he was not allowed back in the country for no apparent reason, even though he’d been here since 1959.

‘He had done all of his work here and he didn’t commit any crimes – he paid his taxes and he worked.’

Mr Barnes, a retired roofer from Milton Keynes, was left trapped in Jamaica after going there in 2010 to renovate his house, which had been damaged in a hurricane.

When he tried to fly back to the UK at Christmas in 2013, he was told his indefinite leave to remain was invalid.

Mr Barnes arrived in Britain in 1959 and wanted to split his retirement between the UK and Jamaica

Mr Barnes arrived in Britain in 1959 and wanted to split his retirement between the UK and Jamaica

The grandfather-of-five said at the time: ‘I feel terrible, like I am being treated as a criminal. I came here to fix up the house so I could split my retirement between Jamaica and England but now I’m told I can’t go back. It is like I have been deported.

‘England was my home, I lived there, worked there, married there and had children there. I worked hard, paid my taxes and have no criminal record. Why can’t I come back?’

The Home Office error meant that in 2018 Mr Barnes was unable to access NHS care for a lung problem – even though he had paid taxes in this country for 51 years. After his case was reported by the Mail in April 2018, he was granted a biometric residence permit.

Yesterday Miss Patel blasted Labour MPs and celebrities such as supermodel Naomi Campbell and actress Thandie Newton who signed an open letter calling for the Jamaica deportation flight to be stopped and linking it with Windrush.

Yesterday Miss Patel blasted Labour MPs and celebrities such as supermodel Naomi Campbell and actress Thandie Newton who signed an open letter calling for the Jamaica deportation flight to be stopped and linking it with Windrush

Yesterday Miss Patel blasted Labour MPs and celebrities such as supermodel Naomi Campbell and actress Thandie Newton who signed an open letter calling for the Jamaica deportation flight to be stopped and linking it with Windrush

She said: ‘To see ill-informed Labour politicians and do-gooding celebrities attempting to conflate the victims of Windrush with these vile criminals set for deportation is not only misjudged and upsetting but deeply offensive.’

The Windrush scandal, which began to emerge in 2017, saw the Home Office wrongly target people for removal after changes in immigration policy. They were entirely innocent of any crime. The Jamaican nationals scheduled for deportation on Wednesday’s Home Office charter flight had been convicted of offences including murder and rape.

Only 13 deportations went ahead after lawyers for another 23 succeeded in removing them from the passenger list. 

These stars are insulting the Windrush Generation: CALVIN ROBINSON slams celebrities invoking the scandal to stop child rapists and murderers being deported

On the mantelpiece in my grandparents’ sitting room when I was growing up, there was a model of the Empire Windrush, the vessel that brought 500 people from the Caribbean to Britain in 1948.

Its arrival at Tilbury Docks marked the start of a wave of Caribbean immigration here that lasted until 1971.

My father’s parents were among nearly half a million people who came in the ensuing years – the so-called Windrush Generation.

Grandma was so proud of that little model. It symbolised a new life for her and her family. They were good, hard-working people who instilled their work ethic in my Dad and then in me. I owe them such a lot.

Calvin Robinson, pictured, said when he was growing up there was a model of the Empire Windrush on the mantelpiece of his grandparent's sitting room

Calvin Robinson, pictured, said when he was growing up there was a model of the Empire Windrush on the mantelpiece of his grandparent’s sitting room 

Sadly, in 2017, details began to emerge of a scandal in which hundreds of innocent Commonwealth citizens who were entitled to live and work here – many of them members of the Windrush Generation – had been wrongly detained by the Home Office, deported and denied legal representation.

These were people, like my grandparents, who made an enormous contribution to our country, taking jobs in the NHS and other sectors that were suffering in the acute labour shortages of the post-war years.

Their treatment was, as the Home Secretary Priti Patel said this week, ‘a stain on our country’s history’ and shamed successive governments who presided over a flawed immigration system.

So it makes my blood absolutely boil when I hear self-serving, virtue-signalling celebrities invoking the Windrush scandal in an attempt to stop the deportation of criminals, including child rapists and murderers.

As the Mail has reported this week, 82 leading figures from the black community were signatories to an open letter of demands sent to six airlines, protesting against the deportation of 50 Jamaican criminals back to the Caribbean. Supermodel Naomi Campbell, actress Naomie Harris, and TV historian David Olusoga were among those who, by signing the letter, in my view, have shamelessly and offensively linked innocent Windrush pioneers who have every right to be in Britain with individuals convicted of horrendous crimes.

One of the men scheduled for deportation, Michael Antonio White, is a convicted murderer who shot his victim six times at close range after a drug deal went wrong. 

And one raped a drunken woman who was asleep on a sofa.

Not one of them is a British citizen – all were born in Jamaica. Yet on Wednesday, in the wake of the celebrity outcry, they were among 23 criminals taken off the passenger list, pending more legal arguments.

I am disgusted that they could be named in the same breath as the Windrush Generation. Yet the deluded, pretentious signatories couldn’t help themselves: ‘Windrush Generation members or Windrush descendants’ might face deportation, they bleated.

It is an outrageous claim and besmirches the legacy of my grandparents and thousands like them to score a cheap political point.

But in making it, they have backed themselves into a ludicrous position in which they are in effect pleading for vicious criminals to receive special treatment. In doing so they are undermining the very cause they profess to support and are making it harder for ordinary people to stand up to real racism.

Labour politicians have been no less quick to drag Windrush into the debate. The shadow minister for immigration Holly Lynch mentioned the ship ten times in one question, as she too implied that some of the criminals could be ‘affected by the wider injustices that impacted the victims of the Windrush scandal’.

Who in their right mind would not want their country to be rid of murderous thugs? We have every right to protect ourselves and our children. What nobody has any right to do is traduce the memory of Windrush pioneers like my grandparents who brought so much good to Britain.

  • Calvin Robinson is a former teacher and now governor of a London state school. 
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Entertainment UK

Naomi Campbell leads call for airlines to halt deportation flights to Jamaica


Naomi Campbell and Thandie Newton are among the celebrities leading the call for airlines to stop deportation flights to Jamaica.

The runway icon, 50, and actress, 48, have urged airlines not to comply with the Home Office if ordered to carry out a deportation flight.

They join forces with actress Naomie Harris, as well as more than 80 black Britons in an open letter to the CEOs of TUI UK, Evelop Airlines, Titan Airways, Carlson Wagonlit Travel, Hi Fly and Air Tanker.

They are also calling for a pause on the operation of future deportation flights to Commonwealth countries.

In the letter, the campaigners say they have grounds to believe the companies had worked with the UK government to “operate and facilitate” deportation flights.

Naomi Campbell is leading the call for airlines to halt deportation flights to Jamaica

They penned: “We have grounds to believe that one of your firms may be planning to operate the flight planned for 2nd December.

“We are writing to ask you to decline to operate the flight on the 2nd December and to pause the operation of deportation flights to Commonwealth countries for the foreseeable future.

“There are a number of important reasons why such flights are wholly inappropriate at this time and risk the unlawful and wrongful removal of people who have the right to remain in the UK.”

Thandie Newton has also joined in on the campaign

The Government said those on board the flight would include “dangerous foreign criminals” – including convicted rapists and murderers – and none of the offenders are eligible for the Windrush Scheme.

However the letter highlights concerns brought to light by the Equality and Human Rights Commission which say the government’s “hostile environment” policies breach equality laws and discriminate against black people in the UK.

Back in February earlier this year, the government had carried out a deportation flight to Jamaica, however with fewer detainees.

This was due to a last-minute Court of Appeal intervention.

Naomie Harris is also part of the call for action

The letter claims one of the men deported to Jamaica in a flight in February “was the grandson of a woman who arrived on the HMT Empire Windrush and is still seeking to have his deportation order revoked”.

The letter continues: “The credible risks of unlawful and wrongful deportations should be considered against a backdrop of concern about systemic racism.

“In an already challenging festive period … we ask you to reflect on whether the operation of this flight would comply with your corporate social responsibility values.”

Priti Patel is the current Secretary of State for the Home Department

A Home Office spokeswoman told the PA news agency: “We make no apology for seeking to remove dangerous foreign criminals to keep the public safe.

“Each week we remove foreign criminals from the UK to different countries who have no right to be here, this flight is no different.

“The people being detained for this flight include convicted murderers and rapists.”

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Headline USA Los Angeles Politics

3 changes with Trump that put more people in danger of deportation | The State



The wave of new instructions to immigration agents by the President’s Government Donald trump It is targeting the petitions of hundreds of immigrants who are at risk of being deported or unable to obtain benefits, experts warn.

In the last week the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Immigration and Citizenship Service (USCIS) have launched new guidelines and regulations that make it difficult for immigrants to successfully get their petitions approved, he warned Fernando Romo, immigration attorney and principal advisor to the Los Angeles Association of Salvadorans (ASOSAL).

“They are basically ordering USCIS officers to dig deeper into the cases, and the discretion of non-approval is increasing so that the negatives outweigh the positives.”, explains Romo.

“If we do not pay attention to these changes this will cause many immigrants to be at risk,” insists the lawyer.

1. Not eligible for citizenship

The lawyer highlights the modifications made this Wednesday to USCIS Policy Manual, which targets immigrants who make their citizenship petitions.

In a press release, the agency said that some immigrants obtained their lawful permanent resident status “by mistake, fraud or failure to comply with the law,” so they will not be eligible for naturalization.

The new guidance “states that an applicant is not eligible for naturalization in cases where the applicant did not obtain permanent residency status legally, including cases in which the US Government was not aware of disqualifying material facts.

Romo cautions that the interpretation is too broad, and it can cause a permanent resident to be disqualified from citizenship for failing to report a prior deportation, a prior crime, or even being married in petitions declaring they were single. Also for presenting false employment letters, among others.

“Now they will be with a magnifying glass on the cases, and they will consult their databases, which are now more up-to-date and where the frauds are reported”, he emphasizes to the lawyer, who warns that this can mean that many cases end in a “nightmare”.

Additionally, USCIS officials will pay special attention to ensuring that immigrants have not abandoned their permanent residency status, when leaving the country for long periods without a permit from the immigration authorities.

The agency warned that when “the application for naturalization is generally denied, the applicant is placed in removal proceedings.”

The modification came less than a week after the naturalization questionnaire was expanded, which in the opinion of activists, represents a new barrier for immigrants.

2. More rejections

This is not the first time the Trump administration has imposed procedural changes. This Thursday a coalition of immigrant advocates filed a lawsuit against USCIS and DHS over a new policy of rejecting applications that have a blank response field.

In the complaint filed in federal court in San Francisco, the plaintiffs note that USCIS has rejected applications for leaving boxes blank even when the question is not applicable, for example, when the applicant does not include an answer for the middle name because it does not have a middle name.

“USCIS’s denial policy is petty, dishonest, and illegal”said in a statement Mary Kenney, Deputy Director of the National Immigration Litigation Alliance (NILA), one of the plaintiff organizations.

“His rejection of thousands of applications for humanitarian immigration benefits because the applicant left a blank space instead of putting ‘N / A’ has no legitimate agency purpose, but has caused great harm to vulnerable immigrants,” said Kenney .

In that regard, Matt Adams, legal director of the Northwest Immigrant Rights Project (NWIRP), said that “this policy is clearly aimed at preventing people from obtaining the humanitarian benefits that Congress has provided.”

For his part, the lawyer Zachary Nightingale, a partner at the Van Der Hout LLP law firm, stressed that “the rejections are so seemingly absurd that the true purpose, to deter and prevent valid claims, becomes undeniably clear. Shamefully, this time around, the target includes some of the most vulnerable and skilled immigrants. “

3. Without permission to work

This week DHS also released a proposal that seeks restrict the approval of work permits to foreigners with a deportation order.

The “Notification of the proposed regulation”, which was published this Thursday in the Federal Register and entered a period of 60 days to receive comments on the “Authorization of employment for certain classes of foreigners with final expulsion orders.”

According to USCIS, under current regulations, “an alien who has a final removal order and who is temporarily released from DHS custody under an order of supervision (OSUP) is generally eligible for an employment authorization document (EAD).” .

Although the measure will specifically affect those people whose deportation has been ordered, but it cannot occur because their country does not accept them, Romo warns that this measure may affect more migrants if the president-elect reduces deportations.

“In the Obama administration, those who had a strike upon deportation had the right to their work permit, if this measure remains in force, it will not allow them to obtain this permit”, alerts the lawyer.

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