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Chris Christie releases PSA urging Americans to wear face masks

Former New Jersey Gov Chris Christie is starring in a new advertisement urging Americans to wear face masks amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The prominent Republican, who is an ally of President Trump, tested positive for the coronavirus on October 3 – one week after he went maskless at the Supreme Court nomination ceremony for Amy Coney Barrett, which was held in the White House Rose Garden. 

In the ad, released on Wednesday, the 58-year-old states: ‘Lying in isolation in ICU for seven days I thought about how wrong I was to remove my mask at the White House. 

‘Today, I think about how wrong it is to let mask wearing divide us, especially as we now know you’re twice as likely to get COVID-19 if you don’t wear a mask. If you don’t do the right thing, we could all end up on the wrong side of history.’ 

Former New Jersey Gov Chris Christie is starring in a new advertisement urging Americans to wear face masks amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Christie is seen going maskless at the White House nomination ceremony for Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett on September 26

Christie is seen going maskless at the White House nomination ceremony for Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett on September 26

The ad may irritate President Trump and other Republicans who have not been in favor of forcing Americans to wear face masks. 

Christie, who coached Trump for his first Presidential debate in September before they both became stricken with COVID-19, has also been critical of the Commander-in-chief’s refusal to concede the election. 

On Sunday, he slammed the continued efforts from Trump and his allies to overturn the election results, claiming their legal theories are an ‘absurdity.’

‘The legal theory put forward by his legal team and by the president is an absurdity,’ he told ABC’s This Week. 

Christie has previously spoken out about his COVID battle, which quickly turned serious, given that he suffers from asthma.    

Back in late October he told ABC’s Good Morning America that he checked himself into a New Jersey hospital the same day as his positive diagnosis as a precaution because of his pre-existing condition. 

‘Within 24 hours, I went from feeling absolutely fine to being in the intensive care unit,’ he said.

He described the virus hitting him ‘like a freight train’. 

‘All of a sudden I got a fever, chills and body aches. I was wracked with pain and exhaustion.’  

Christie said he spent seven days in ICU and was treated with the antiviral drug remdesivir. 

Christie is seen donning a face mask in the new PSA released across America on Wednesday

Christie is seen donning a face mask in the new PSA released across America on Wednesday

At the time Christie said Trump should also do more to encourage people to wear masks. 

‘You know, I heard the president say that he has no problem with masks. I think we should be even more affirmative about it,’ he said. 

‘Leaders, all across the politics, sports, the media, should be saying to people, put your masks on and be safe until we get a vaccine that could help to protect us.

‘We need to be telling people there is no downside to you wearing masks and in fact there can be a great deal of upside.’ 

On Tuesday, America witnessed its deadliest day of the pandemic thus far. 

The US set a new record for coronavirus deaths reported in 24 hours with more than 3,700 citizens succumbing to the disease. 

The harrowing tally from Johns Hopkins University marked the fourth time daily deaths have exceeded 3,000 throughout the pandemic. All four have occurred in the last week.

Hospitalizations also set a new record on Wednesday with 113,069. The number of people hospitalized has exceeded 100,000 for 15 days in a row, with daily increases every day since December 5.      

More than 230,700 new cases were reported – an increase of more than 41,000 from Tuesday’s tally. The total case load of more than 16.87 million represents roughly five percent of the US population.  

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Dianne Feinstein to step down as top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary panel after Lindsey Graham hug


California Senator Dianne Feinstein said she will step down from her role as the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee, giving up the powerful spot after public criticism of her bipartisan outreach and her handling of Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearings.

Feinstein, 87, said in a statement that she would not seek the position in the next Congress. 

Tensions came to a head during the Barrett hearings, when Feinstein closed out the proceedings with an embrace for Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., and a public thanks to Graham for a job well done. 

Neither senator was wearing a face mask at the time of the embrace. 

Senator Dianne Feinstein is to step down as the top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee from January when the next Congress begins. Pictured, Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) (R) and Chairman Lindsey Graham (R-SC) (L) shake hands as the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett come to a close last month

Feinstein's stepping down comes after she drew the ire from progressives for her handling of Amy Coney Barrett's contentious Supreme Court confirmation including this hug with Graham

Feinstein’s stepping down comes after she drew the ire from progressives for her handling of Amy Coney Barrett’s contentious Supreme Court confirmation including this hug with Graham

Democrats had fiercely opposed Barrett’s nomination to replace the late liberal icon Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

‘This has been one of the best set of hearings that I’ve participated in,’ Feinstein said at the end of the hearing.

Those actions put her immediately in the crosshairs of some influential liberals who had been questioning for some time whether she was right for the job.

‘It’s time for Sen. Feinstein to step down from her leadership position on the Senate Judiciary Committee,’ said Brian Fallon, the executive director of Demand Justice, which opposes conservative nominees to the courts. ‘If she won’t, her colleagues need to intervene.’

Feinstein also irked some of her fellow Democrats at Barrett’s first confirmation hearing, in 2017 for an appeals court, when she said that Barrett’s opposition to abortion must be rooted in her religion and questioned if it would influence her rulings on the bench, saying the ‘dogma lives loudly within you.’

Ranking member U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks during Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing

Ranking member U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) speaks during Supreme Court Justice nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett’s Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing

Republicans rushed to confirm Barrett before election, shifting the court to the right for decades. Democrats felt Feinstein, pictured hugging Graham did not fight hard enough for the seat

Republicans rushed to confirm Barrett before election, shifting the court to the right for decades. Democrats felt Feinstein, pictured hugging Graham did not fight hard enough for the seat

Republicans seized on the phrase, saying it was offensive to Catholics. The backlash helped Barrett rise in the ranks of Supreme Court hopefuls.

Graham also seized on Feinstein’s complimentary words at the end of Barrett’s hearings, frequently repeating them on the campaign trail in his reelection bid this year and using the backlash to disparage Democrats.

‘I hate the fact that saying something nice about me, about the way I conducted the hearings, has gotten to the point now that people will drive you out of office,’ Graham said.

Although Feinstein did not say why she was stepping down, she said she would focus her attentions on wildfire and drought issues and the effects of climate change, which are important in her home state. 

She plans to continue to serve on the Judiciary, Appropriations and intelligence panels, but said she will not seek the role of top Democrat on any of those committees.

Chairman Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) embrace following the fourth day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Capitol Hill in Washington

Chairman Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Ranking Member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) embrace following the fourth day of confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett on Capitol Hill in Washington

‘I will continue to do my utmost to bring about positive change in the coming years,’ she said in the statement. She has held the Judiciary post since 2017.

Illinois Senator Dick Durbin, the Senate’s No. 2 Democrat, said he will seek to replace Feinstein as the committee’s top Democrat. He is third in seniority on the panel, after Vermont Sen. Patrick Leahy, who is currently the top Democrat on the appropriations committee.

Durbin organized the Democratic response during the Barrett hearings, coordinating an effort to focus the criticism on the court’s upcoming consideration of the health care law and away from the nominee personally. 

He led daily news conferences during breaks in the hearings with the other Democrats on the panel while Feinstein usually did not appear.

‘We have to roll up our sleeves and get to work on undoing the damage of the last four years and protecting fundamental civil and human rights,’ Durbin said in a statement.

Durbin’s office has said there is nothing in Democratic caucus rules that blocks him form serving in his leadership post and also as the top Democrat on Judiciary.

Feinstein, a former mayor of San Francisco was first elected to Senate in 1992. She is pictured here during her campaign at the Democratic National convention in that year in New York

Feinstein, a former mayor of San Francisco was first elected to Senate in 1992. She is pictured here during her campaign at the Democratic National convention in that year in New York

Some Democrats felt Feinstein did not fight hard enough for the seat formerly held by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the late liberal icon, pictured left meeting Feinstein in July 1993

Some Democrats felt Feinstein did not fight hard enough for the seat formerly held by Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the late liberal icon, pictured left meeting Feinstein in July 1993

Feinstein, first elected in 1992, has been a powerful force in the Democratic Party and is the former chairwoman of the intelligence panel. She has not shied from bipartisanship even as her state has become increasingly liberal and both parties have become more polarized.

In a statement, Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said he was ‘grateful for Senator Feinstein´s leadership and contributions to our caucus and country’ in the Judiciary post.

Feinstein´s ‘experience, decades-long relationship with President-elect Biden, and leadership on so many issues will continue to be an asset for our caucus, California, and the country as we begin a new term with the new president,’ said Schumer, D-N.Y.

It is still unclear which party will hold the majority in the Senate next year. If Democrats win two runoff elections in Georgia, they could take the Senate very narrowly.

Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley is expected to reclaim the top Republican spot on the panel next session after leaving for two years to head the Senate Finance Committee.

Feinstein, first elected in 1992, has been a powerful force in the Democratic Party and is the former chairwoman of the intelligence panel. She is pictured in April 2000 on Meet The Press

Feinstein, first elected in 1992, has been a powerful force in the Democratic Party and is the former chairwoman of the intelligence panel. She is pictured in April 2000 on Meet The Press



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Amy Coney Barret is Officially a Justice of the Supreme Court… and Raises Concerns | The NY Journal


Judge Barrett was sworn in before Chief Justice John Roberts.

Photo:
Fred Schilling / Collection of the Supreme Court of the United States / Getty Images

With the judicial oath before the President of the Supreme Court, John Roberts, The judge Amy coney barrett It is officially a member of the highest court in the United States, although concerns about its performance in civil rights, immigration and electoral cases are mounting among activists and experts.

Judge Barrett, 48, is 115th on the court and, after being sworn in, she was greeted with a request to rule on an election decision in Pennsylvania, a key state this year.

Luzerne County attorneys asked the highest court to prevent Judge Barrett from participating in a Republican petition to block a state Supreme Court decision that allowed the counting of ballots received three days after the election. The defenders consider that the position of the judge during the hearings in the Senate are worrisome for her to hear this case.

The swearing-in photo was shared by the Supreme Court, which indicated that all attendees followed the rules of social distancing and wore masks to avoid coronavirus infections.

The conservative judge, who tips the balance that way in court 6-3, achieves the position after the death of the judge Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who had a practically opposite profile.

The first disputes you will face will be the Affordable Care Act (ACA), known as Obamacare, and possibly the decision on the presidential election, if there is a dispute in courts before a close contest between the former vice president Joe biden and the president Donald trump.

The appointment of Judge Barrett has been the most expeditious prior to the elections, just nine days away, unlike 2016, when the process was stopped more than 70 days after the death of the judge Antonin Scalia, giving President Trump the opportunity to appoint the judge Neil gorsuch.

The vote in the Senate came after several hours of opposition by Democrats. In the end the Republicans won 52-48. The next step was a ceremony at the White House, where the judge Clarence thomas administered the constitutional oath to Barrett.

Impartiality in rights

Before and during their hearings in the Judicial Committee, defenders of civil rights and experts in health, immigration, electoral rights, among others, expressed their concern over the appointment of Judge Barrett, due to its negative record in opinions and decisions on – for example – immigration and the legal interruption of pregnancy.

The plight of the Republicans and President Trump unleashed more alerts, considering that they were seeking to impose a court “as”, before a closed electoral process.

“President Donald Trump and the Republican Senate believe they can use the US Supreme Court as a political tool to override the will of the American people on health care, Roe versus Wade, and democracy itself ”, he accused Neera tanden, executive director of the Center for American Progress Action Fund. “Appointing a new judge eight days before the elections – after more than 60 million people have already voted – is a serious threat to the legitimacy of the court and an insult to the voters. The American people will spend the next week giving their verdict on this hostile takeover of the Supreme Court. “

The group Voto Latino criticized the plight of the majority leader in the Senate, Mitch McConnell (Kentucky) to endorse Judge Barrett, while delaying the approval of financial aid in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“There is absolutely no justice whatsoever with this confirmation”, He said Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino. “Judge Coney Barrett’s hearing was a sham, leaving the American people with little or no idea of ​​her beliefs and intentions when she is in court. Rather than helping the country through a global pandemic, Senate Republicans have chosen to distort the high court for decades to come. “

The organization Climate Power 2020 also criticized the hasty decision to fill the position left by the death of Judge Bader Ginsburg.

“The rush to confirm Barrett, even after early voting for the 2020 presidential election began, shows how eager Senate Republicans are to impose Donald Trump’s anti-environmental agenda in court,” he warned. Lori Loders, executive director of that group.

The troubling issues

The opinions as an academic and her decisions in court call into question the impartiality of Judge Barrett on several issues:

  • Electoral rights
  • Legal termination of pregnancy (Roe v. Wade)
  • Immigration, such as separation of children from their parents
  • Low cost health insurance (ACA), known as Obamacare
  • Decisions on public policies to face climate change

.



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House Judiciary committee trolls Hillary by saying Happy Birthday after Amy Coney Barrett confirmed


‘Amy Coney Barrett, confirmed. Happy Birthday Hillary!’ House Judiciary Committee trolls Clinton on her 73rd birthday after Trump filled Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s seat on the Supreme Court

  • The House Judiciary GOP Twitter account wished Hillary Clinton ‘Happy Birthday’ shortly after Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed
  • The tweet came shortly after the 52-48 confirmation vote was finalized Monday
  • Although Clinton did not respond directly to the tweet she urged people to vote in next Tuesday’s election and turf Senate Republicans out

The House Judiciary Committee Republicans trolled former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Monday night mocking her as they tweeted ‘Happy Birthday’ shortly after Amy Coney Barrett had been confirmed to the Supreme Court by the Senate.

‘Amy Coney Barrett, confirmed. Happy Birthday, @HillaryClinton!’ the tweet read.

The message was posted on the House Judiciary GOP Twitter account and was likely written by its Ranking Member, Congressman Jim Jordan. 

The message came minutes after Barrett was confirmed 52-48 in a Senate vote.

The House Judiciary GOP Twitter account wished Hillary Clinton ‘Happy Birthday’ shortly after Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed

Although Clinton did not respond directly to the tweet she urged people to vote in next Tuesday's election and turf Senate Republicans out

Although Clinton did not respond directly to the tweet she urged people to vote in next Tuesday’s election and turf Senate Republicans out

Senator Susan Collins of Maine was the only Republican to cross party lines and oppose the nominee. 

Clinton, who was celebrating her 73rd birthday on Monday had condemned Barrett’s confirmation on Monday night and although she did not respond directly to the tweet she called on Americans to vote GOP senators out. 

‘Senate Republicans just pushed through a Supreme Court justice who will help them take away Americans’ health care in the middle of a pandemic. For them, this is victory. Vote them out,’ she tweeted minutes after receiving her birthday greeting. 

The House Judiciary tweet generated a mixture of responses with Republican voters gleefully celebrating the ‘gift’ of the Supreme Court Justice confirmation being held on Clinton’s birthday, while others appeared shocked at the petulant nature of the message.

‘Are you 12’ added one.  ‘No one can ever accuse the GOP of having class, that’s for sure’, added another. 

‘This tweet proves that a 13yo runs this account,’ added another.     

Before the Senate vote took place, Clinton reiterated the case that many Democrats who are critical of Barrett’s nomination had made. 

Before the Senate vote took place, Clinton reiterated the case that many who are critical of Barrett's nomination have made

Before the Senate vote took place, Clinton reiterated the case that many who are critical of Barrett’s nomination have made

The former presidential hopeful posted a black and white photograph of herself from her school days

The former presidential hopeful posted a black and white photograph of herself from her school days

‘It is an insult to the American people that the GOP is ramming through a Supreme Court justice with just eight days until the end of an election in which nearly 60 million people have already voted.’

Earlier in the day Clinton used her birthday to reach out to voters in an appeal to defeat Trump who had defeated her in 2016. 

The former presidential hopeful posted a black and white photograph of herself from her school days with the caption: ‘It’s my birthday. Here’s my one wish: that you reach out to one person in your life who may not vote this year and encourage them to turn out for Biden-Harris. All of us have more power than we know,’ she tweeted.

Supporters of Amy Coney Barrett quickly seized upon Clinton's tweet and made it their own

Supporters of Amy Coney Barrett quickly seized upon Clinton’s tweet and made it their own

One Twitter user creatively used a shot of Barrett's confirmation hearings together with a picture of Hillary Clinton

One Twitter user creatively used a shot of Barrett’s confirmation hearings together with a picture of Hillary Clinton

Barrett was sworn later on Monday night at a White House ceremony with President Trump and Justice Clarence Thomas, the Supreme Court’s longest-serving justice.

It means that Republicans have succeeded in installing a third Trump justice on the court, locking in a conservative majority for years to come. 

On Tuesday, Barrett will take her judicial oath in a private ceremony with Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. 

A number of Twitter users were not impressed with the nature of the original tweet by the GOP

A number of Twitter users were not impressed with the nature of the original tweet by the GOP

First words as a Justice: Amy Coney Barrett takes the oath of office as Donald Trump savors the confirmation of the third justice of his presidency

First words as a Justice: Amy Coney Barrett takes the oath of office as Donald Trump savors the confirmation of the third justice of his presidency

Moment of history: Amy Coney Barrett, her hand on a Bible held by her husband Jesse, is sworn in as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court by Clarence Thomas, its longest-serving justice

Moment of history: Amy Coney Barrett, her hand on a Bible held by her husband Jesse, is sworn in as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court by Clarence Thomas, its longest-serving justice





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Moment Democrat Mazie Hirono says ‘hell no’ and gives a thumbs down during ACB’s Senate vote


Amy Coney Barrett is 48, a mother of seven and a brilliant legal mind – and now she is the most divisive Supreme Court Justice in at least a generation and perhaps far longer.

She brings to the Supreme Court a short judicial career, a longer academic one and the hopes of a conservative legal movement that they have a secure 6-3 majority in the high court for now, and a stalwart vote on it for many decades to come.

Coney Barrett’s life story makes her the sixth Catholic on the court, keeps the six-three male-female make-up of the bench, and for the first time ever puts on the court someone who openly identifies with the charismatic wing of modern Christianity.

She is also the only one who did not receive an education at Harvard or Yale, and the only mid-western and southern justice, having been born and brought up in Louisiana and spent the rest of her life in Indiana.

Barrett was brought up in Metairie, Louisiana, as a member of charismatic, conservative, Catholic group  People of Praise and one of seven children.

Her father, Mike Coney, a former oil company lawyer, has been a leading member for decades. Her attorney-husband, Jesse, 46, whom she met while both were students at Notre Dame University, was also raised in the group.

She had studied for her undergraduate degree at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and contemplated further study in English literature but instead decided to study law, going to Notre Dame whose law school has built a reputation as predominantly conservative.

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, her husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children Emma; Vivian; Tess; John Peter; Liam; Juliet; and Benjamin. Her large family has been part of her appeal for conservatives. Vivian and John Peter are adopted from Haiti and their youngest son Benjamin has Down Syndrome

Judge Amy Coney Barrett introduced her family at her confirmation hearing including her children (from left, first row) Liam, Vivian, Tess, Juliet, Emma, J.P. and husband Jesse and then siblings (from left, second row) Vivian, Eileen, Michael, Megan and Amanda. Sister Carrie was seated across the aisle

Judge Amy Coney Barrett introduced her family at her confirmation hearing including her children (from left, first row) Liam, Vivian, Tess, Juliet, Emma, J.P. and husband Jesse and then siblings (from left, second row) Vivian, Eileen, Michael, Megan and Amanda. Sister Carrie was seated across the aisle 

Amy Coney Barrett is seen in a family photo with siblings and parents. In 2018, Barrett's father Mike Coney wrote an online biography of himself on his church's website, saying he joined People of Praise because he and his wife Linda 'felt a call to live life in a close knit Christian community…one that would help form our children into good Christians and strengthen our marriage and family'

Amy Coney Barrett is seen in a family photo with siblings and parents. In 2018, Barrett’s father Mike Coney wrote an online biography of himself on his church’s website, saying he joined People of Praise because he and his wife Linda ‘felt a call to live life in a close knit Christian community…one that would help form our children into good Christians and strengthen our marriage and family’

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children. She and her husband Jesse

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children. She and her husband Jesse

Described by one professor as the best student he had ever had, she went on to be a clerk for Antonin Scalia, the justice who championed originalism as a judicial philosophy.

She had a brief career in private practice but became a law professor at Notre Dame, and married and had seven children.

The visible manifestation of her conservative Catholic beliefs was part of her appeal to political conservatives.

But it has also focused attention on the tiny group, which has just over 2,000 members and which does not represent mainstream Catholicism. 

People of Praise is headquartered in Notre Dame’s hometown, South Bend, Indiana, and many of its leading members have ties to the university. According to its website, the group has branches in 14 states as well as one in Canada and two in the Caribbean. It runs three Grades 7-through-12 Trinity Schools and one elementary school.

Both— who lives in South Bend — and People of Praise seem to have gone to extraordinary lengths to hide her affiliation. Articles mentioning her were removed from the group’s website shortly before she was to be considered for a seat on the Federal Appeals Court in 2017.

Barrett’s ties to People of Praise only became public when the New York Times broke the story three weeks after her confirmation hearing as an appeals court judge, but before the committee had voted. The committee eventually split along party lines to confirm her. Three Democrats voted with the Republican majority in the vote in the full Senate. 

People of Praise is strongly anti-abortion. It also rejects homosexuality. ‘Both are seen as being accepted by human law, but rejected by divine law,’ the former member explained.

‘Homosexual relationships are taboo, and any LGBTQ inclinations are seen as temptations that must be overcome through prayer. If that fails, the member must lead a life of chastity.’

Even dating is a no-no until a member has ‘prayed through their state in life’ and decided they are ready to ‘marry for the Lord.’ If they have not committed themselves to marriage, they must not date.

Barrett got her law degree at Notre Dame, graduating first in her class in 1997. She's pictured speaking at Notre Dame's Law School commencement in 2018

Barrett got her law degree at Notre Dame, graduating first in her class in 1997. She’s pictured speaking at Notre Dame’s Law School commencement in 2018 

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small group that teaches that wives have to obey their husbands in everything

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small group that teaches that wives have to obey their husbands in everything

The group is probably best known for its doctrine that women must obey their husbands in everything, and its system where all men and single women must report to their mentor — called a ‘head’. Husbands act as the ‘head’ for their wives.

The ‘heads’ have such influence they give direction on who a member should date or even marry, how to raise children, whether to take a new job and where to live. 

Until recently the female leader was known as a ‘handmaid.’ But that title was dropped after the success of the dystopian TV show The Handmaid’s Tale and the negative connotations it brought to the title. 

Author Margaret Atwood, who wrote the original novel, said it was based on a group that has similar views to People of Praise. 

The conservative Catholic beliefs have bled into her public life:  she is a former member of the Notre Dame’s ‘Faculty for Life’ and in 2015 signed a letter to the Catholic Church affirming the ‘teachings of the Church as truth.’

Among those teachings were the ‘value of human life from conception to natural death’ and marriage-family values ‘founded on the indissoluble commitment of a man and a woman’.

She has previously written that Supreme Court precedents are not sacrosanct. Liberals have taken these comments as a threat to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion nationwide.

Barrett wrote that she agrees ‘with those who say that a justice’s duty is to the Constitution and that it is thus more legitimate for her to enforce her best understanding of the Constitution rather than a precedent she thinks clearly in conflict with it’.

What she said is the distillation of originalism and raises the possibility that she could tear up precedent if she sees it as out of line with the original constiution.  

That puts her in sync with Scalia and the Republican senators who voted for her and expect her to rule in line with that for decades to come; it puts her violently at odds with those who do not agree, and puts her on track to be a justice whose presence on the bench is going to divide opinion as long as she remains on it.



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AOC says ‘expand the court’ just moments after ACB was confirmed


Amy Coney Barrett is 48, a mother of seven and a brilliant legal mind – and now she is the most divisive Supreme Court Justice in at least a generation and perhaps far longer.

She brings to the Supreme Court a short judicial career, a longer academic one and the hopes of a conservative legal movement that they have a secure 6-3 majority in the high court for now, and a stalwart vote on it for many decades to come.

Coney Barrett’s life story makes her the sixth Catholic on the court, keeps the six-three male-female make-up of the bench, and for the first time ever puts on the court someone who openly identifies with the charismatic wing of modern Christianity.

She is also the only one who did not receive an education at Harvard or Yale, and the only mid-western and southern justice, having been born and brought up in Louisiana and spent the rest of her life in Indiana.

Barrett was brought up in Metairie, Louisiana, as a member of charismatic, conservative, Catholic group  People of Praise and one of seven children.

Her father, Mike Coney, a former oil company lawyer, has been a leading member for decades. Her attorney-husband, Jesse, 46, whom she met while both were students at Notre Dame University, was also raised in the group.

She had studied for her undergraduate degree at Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, and contemplated further study in English literature but instead decided to study law, going to Notre Dame whose law school has built a reputation as predominantly conservative.

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, her husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children Emma; Vivian; Tess; John Peter; Liam; Juliet; and Benjamin. Her large family has been part of her appeal for conservatives. Vivian and John Peter are adopted from Haiti and their youngest son Benjamin has Down Syndrome

Judge Amy Coney Barrett introduced her family at her confirmation hearing including her children (from left, first row) Liam, Vivian, Tess, Juliet, Emma, J.P. and husband Jesse and then siblings (from left, second row) Vivian, Eileen, Michael, Megan and Amanda. Sister Carrie was seated across the aisle

Judge Amy Coney Barrett introduced her family at her confirmation hearing including her children (from left, first row) Liam, Vivian, Tess, Juliet, Emma, J.P. and husband Jesse and then siblings (from left, second row) Vivian, Eileen, Michael, Megan and Amanda. Sister Carrie was seated across the aisle 

Amy Coney Barrett is seen in a family photo with siblings and parents. In 2018, Barrett's father Mike Coney wrote an online biography of himself on his church's website, saying he joined People of Praise because he and his wife Linda 'felt a call to live life in a close knit Christian community…one that would help form our children into good Christians and strengthen our marriage and family'

Amy Coney Barrett is seen in a family photo with siblings and parents. In 2018, Barrett’s father Mike Coney wrote an online biography of himself on his church’s website, saying he joined People of Praise because he and his wife Linda ‘felt a call to live life in a close knit Christian community…one that would help form our children into good Christians and strengthen our marriage and family’

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children. She and her husband Jesse

Family photo of Amy Coney Barrett, husband Jesse Barrett, and their seven children. She and her husband Jesse

Described by one professor as the best student he had ever had, she went on to be a clerk for Antonin Scalia, the justice who championed originalism as a judicial philosophy.

She had a brief career in private practice but became a law professor at Notre Dame, and married and had seven children.

The visible manifestation of her conservative Catholic beliefs was part of her appeal to political conservatives.

But it has also focused attention on the tiny group, which has just over 2,000 members and which does not represent mainstream Catholicism. 

People of Praise is headquartered in Notre Dame’s hometown, South Bend, Indiana, and many of its leading members have ties to the university. According to its website, the group has branches in 14 states as well as one in Canada and two in the Caribbean. It runs three Grades 7-through-12 Trinity Schools and one elementary school.

Both— who lives in South Bend — and People of Praise seem to have gone to extraordinary lengths to hide her affiliation. Articles mentioning her were removed from the group’s website shortly before she was to be considered for a seat on the Federal Appeals Court in 2017.

Barrett’s ties to People of Praise only became public when the New York Times broke the story three weeks after her confirmation hearing as an appeals court judge, but before the committee had voted. The committee eventually split along party lines to confirm her. Three Democrats voted with the Republican majority in the vote in the full Senate. 

People of Praise is strongly anti-abortion. It also rejects homosexuality. ‘Both are seen as being accepted by human law, but rejected by divine law,’ the former member explained.

‘Homosexual relationships are taboo, and any LGBTQ inclinations are seen as temptations that must be overcome through prayer. If that fails, the member must lead a life of chastity.’

Even dating is a no-no until a member has ‘prayed through their state in life’ and decided they are ready to ‘marry for the Lord.’ If they have not committed themselves to marriage, they must not date.

Barrett got her law degree at Notre Dame, graduating first in her class in 1997. She's pictured speaking at Notre Dame's Law School commencement in 2018

Barrett got her law degree at Notre Dame, graduating first in her class in 1997. She’s pictured speaking at Notre Dame’s Law School commencement in 2018 

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small group that teaches that wives have to obey their husbands in everything

Barrett and her husband Jesse are members of People of Praise, a small group that teaches that wives have to obey their husbands in everything

The group is probably best known for its doctrine that women must obey their husbands in everything, and its system where all men and single women must report to their mentor — called a ‘head’. Husbands act as the ‘head’ for their wives.

The ‘heads’ have such influence they give direction on who a member should date or even marry, how to raise children, whether to take a new job and where to live. 

Until recently the female leader was known as a ‘handmaid.’ But that title was dropped after the success of the dystopian TV show The Handmaid’s Tale and the negative connotations it brought to the title. 

Author Margaret Atwood, who wrote the original novel, said it was based on a group that has similar views to People of Praise. 

The conservative Catholic beliefs have bled into her public life:  she is a former member of the Notre Dame’s ‘Faculty for Life’ and in 2015 signed a letter to the Catholic Church affirming the ‘teachings of the Church as truth.’

Among those teachings were the ‘value of human life from conception to natural death’ and marriage-family values ‘founded on the indissoluble commitment of a man and a woman’.

She has previously written that Supreme Court precedents are not sacrosanct. Liberals have taken these comments as a threat to the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion nationwide.

Barrett wrote that she agrees ‘with those who say that a justice’s duty is to the Constitution and that it is thus more legitimate for her to enforce her best understanding of the Constitution rather than a precedent she thinks clearly in conflict with it’.

What she said is the distillation of originalism and raises the possibility that she could tear up precedent if she sees it as out of line with the original constiution.  

That puts her in sync with Scalia and the Republican senators who voted for her and expect her to rule in line with that for decades to come; it puts her violently at odds with those who do not agree, and puts her on track to be a justice whose presence on the bench is going to divide opinion as long as she remains on it.



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Amy Coney Barrett is CONFIRMED to the Supreme Court by Senate


Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court Monday evening by the Senate in a 52-48 vote – with Republican Susan Collins crossing the aisle to vote against her.

Donald Trump’s third nominee was not in the chamber to watch the roll call vote, which allows her to join the eight justices on Tuesday morning, and potentially to decide on cases about voting before the November 3 election. 

Senate president pro tempore Chuck Grassley declared her confirmation at 8.06pm; outside the Supreme Court conservatives chanted Coney Barrett’s name as soon as she was confirmed.

Her confirmation transforms the court to a 6-3 conservative majority and comes after fierce opposition from Democrats, whose presidential nominee Joe Biden has resisted pressure to promise to pack the court if he wins – but who says he will order a commission on reforming the high court. 

Before the final vote she was praised by Republican majority leader Mitch McConnell who said: ‘By every account, the Supreme Court is getting not just an outstanding lawyer but a fantastic person.  

‘This is one of the brilliant, admired and well-qualified nominees in our lifetime,’ he said.

She will be the only justice confirmed with a law degree from ‘any school not named Harvard or Yale.’ 

The newest justice: Amy Coney Barrett, 48, was confirmed on Monday evening 52-48 by the Senate and will be able to join the other justices Tuesday morning

Voting under way: The final minutes before Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to be the ninth justice of the Supreme Court

Voting under way: The final minutes before Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to be the ninth justice of the Supreme Court

Three for three: Mitch McConnell, the Republican leader, has now shepherded Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett on to the high court – each one in controversial circumstances

Objection: Democratic minority leader Chuck Schumer said that Republicans have tarnished themselves with the rush to put Barrett on the seat instead of letting voters decide the next president and allowing them to nominate a replacement of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Objection: Democratic minority leader Chuck Schumer said that Republicans have tarnished themselves with the rush to put Barrett on the seat instead of letting voters decide the next president and allowing them to nominate a replacement of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

McConnell added in an acknowledgment of the controversy over killing Rhth Bader Ginsburg’s seat days before the election and in defiance of her dying wish: ‘I think we can all acknowledge that both sides in the Senate have sort of parallel oral histories about the last 30 or so years. 

‘Each side feel the other side struck first and struck worse.’

Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, however, scorned the process which saw Coney Barrett confirmed on the eve of an election when McConnell had stopped even a hearing for Merrick Garland, Barack Obama’s nominee, in 2016.

‘You may win this vote. And Amy Coney Barrett may become the next Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. But you will never, ever, get your credibility back,’ he said to Republicans on the Senate floor.

Democrats had made the nomination before an election the center of their case against her, and highlighted her conservative rulings while a federal appeals court judge.

They had also warned that she may vote down Obamacare, move to overturn Roe v. Wade, which enshrines women’s right to choose, and imperil restrictions on gun ownership, but could not stop McConnell’s express train to fill the seat before the election.

The 48-year-old becomes the youngest member of the court, and almost certainly one of its most conservative. 

But with Collins – whose re-election in Maine next week is already in jeopardy, according to polls – voting against Coney Barrett, she is the only one of Trump’s nominees not to have at least one Democratic vote, and the only one with a Republican voting against her.  

Justice Clarence Thomas is on the docket to swear in the 7th Circuit appellate judge to the Supreme Court at a White House ceremony.

‘Justice Clarence Thomas will administer the official Constitutional Oath to Judge Amy Coney Barrett at the White House tonight,’ a senior White House official told The New York Times. 

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows sought to assure reporters Monday that the Rose Garden ceremony would include safety precautions, but he did not say whether face coverings would be required.

‘We’re doing tonight the best we can to encourage as much social distancing as possible,’ he said.

Three seats: Donald Trump got his third nominee confirmed with just eight days to go until the election - which Amy Coney Barrett may well become involved in deciding the outcome of

Three seats: Donald Trump got his third nominee confirmed with just eight days to go until the election – which Amy Coney Barrett may well become involved in deciding the outcome of

Clarence Thomas

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, 72, will swear in Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court in a White House ceremony as soon as she is confirmed in the Senate vote Monday evening

The White House is planning a Rose Garden celebration of her confirmation, similar to the 'superspreader' event announcing Barrett's nomination last month that sparked a White House coronavirus outbreak ¿ infecting the president, first lady and their son, as well as several top aides and lawmakers

The White House is planning a Rose Garden celebration of her confirmation, similar to the ‘superspreader’ event announcing Barrett’s nomination last month that sparked a White House coronavirus outbreak – infecting the president, first lady and their son, as well as several top aides and lawmakers

The plans had set off alarm bells as it sounds eerily similar to the Rose Garden event last month when Trump announced Barrett’s nomination, inviting a whole crowd of aides, advisers, lawmakers and supporters to witness the occasion.

That event sparked a White House outbreak of COVID-19, which infected the president, first lady Melania and their son Barron, as well as about a dozen others within Trump’s inner circle.  

Not present in the Senate was Mike Pence. Pence announced earlier Monday that he was ditching his plans to attend after Democrats demanded he steer clear of the Capitol as five of his aides tested positive for coronavirus. 

The White House, however, is still looking to hold a Rose Garden celebration with a ceremonial swearing in of Barrett either Monday or Tuesday.

Speaking to reporters on the tarmac at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Pennsylvania on Monday, President Donald Trump assured the celebration would be a rather small, ‘very nice event.’  

On Sunday, the Senate held a procedural vote to advance Barrett’s nomination and kicked off 30 hours of debate, which will clear the way for a vote Monday evening. 

‘This is something to be really proud of and feel good about,’ Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said during a rare weekend session.

McConnell lauded that Democrats ‘won’t be able to do much about this for a long time to come’, in contrast to legislative actions, which can be undone with new executive or legislative terms.

Barrett, a 48-year-old appellate judge for the 7th circuit, is a staunch Roman Catholic and life-long conservative. Her personal pro-life views have raised eyebrows among progressives who claim she will dismantle a woman’s right to an abortion by working to overturn Roe v. Wade.

She is a member of People of Praise, a small and ultra-conservative charismatic group whose members speak in tongues.

Republicans had painted questions over her faith as an attack on Catholics at large and Democrats had steered clear of the group in their questions to her. 

Her lifetime appointment to the highest U.S. court will also drastically change the makeup of the Supreme Court for a generation to come. 

The mother of seven – five biological and two adopted from Haiti – has embraced her classification as the ‘female Antonin Scalia’ and says his jurisprudential practice of ‘applying the law as written’ will be how she serves. 

During the three days of confirmation hearings earlier this month, including a day of opening statements and two days of questioning, Barrett reiterated her stance as a textualist and originalist, stressing this means she would apply the Constitution to cases as it’s written and was intended by the drafters.

In the short term, Barrett could help decide election and voting-related issues as the vote on her confirmation comes just over a week before Election Day.

Donald Trump has made it clear he feels the results of the election could end up at the Supreme Court – and with a conservative majority of 6-3 with Barrett seated, it’s more likely they would rule in favor of the president.

Also about a week after the election the Supreme Court will take up a case on the Affordable Care Act, which Democrats fear will be overturned if Barrett has anything to say about it.



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Barrett is Confirmed by Senate as New Supreme Court Justice | The NY Journal


Barrett is confirmed by the Senate as the new Supreme Court Justice.

Photo:
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / POOL / AFP / Getty Images

The Senate confirmed Amy coney barrett as a new judge of the Supreme Court. The Republican majority validated the candidate proposed by the president, Donald Trump, with what thus reinforced the conservative bias of the highest court since there are currently six magistrates of this ideology compared to three progressives.

It is an unprecedented decision due to its proximity to the elections.

Barrett was confirmed with 52 votes in favor, almost all of Republican senators, and 48 against, all the democrats and a republican legislatorSusan Collins, who confirmed her disagreement against Barrett as unfair so shortly before the presidential election.

Soon more information …

.



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Suspicious package reported outside the US Capitol ahead of Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation 


BREAKING NEWS: Suspicious package reported outside the US Capitol just hours before Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation

A suspicious package has been reported outside the US Capitol in Washington DC, just hours before Amy Coney Barrett is set to be confirmed as a Supreme Court justice. 

The unidentified item was reportedly sighted at the East Front of the Capitol Building. 

Officers from the United States Capitol Police Department are investigating.

No further information was immediately available. 

The USCP has not yet responded to a DailyMail.com request for comment. 

This is a developing story… 

A suspicious package has been reported outside the US Capitol in Washington DC, just hours before Amy Coney Barrett is set to be confirmed as a Supreme Court justice



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Senate Judiciary Committee votes to subpoena Twitter’s Jack Dorsey and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg


January 2009: Hunter Biden (right) quits lobbying because his father has become vice president, and sets up investment and advisory firm firm Rosemont Seneca with friends Christopher Heinz – John Kerry’s stepson – and Devon Archer (left), a former Kerry aide

July 2010: Ukrainian oligarch Mykola Zlochevsky, who owns its biggest natural gas company Burisma joins the government of its president Viktor Yanukovych

February 2014: Yanukovych is deposed in a revolution which claims scores of lives and Burisma Zlochevsky is thrown out of government too

April 16: Burisma is secretly accused of money-laundering by Britain’s Serious Fraud Office. On the same day Archer meets Joe Biden at the White House. Six days later Archer joins the board of Burisma 

April 28: Britain’s Serious Fraud Office freeze $23 million of Burisma’s cash, every dollar which exists in the UK’s banking system 

May 12: Hunter joins the board of Burisma to improve ‘corporate governance.’ Hunter’s salary is later revealed to be $50,000-a-month. Burisma board advisor Vadym Pozharskyi who had met Hunter in Lake Como, Italy, days earlier, emails him asking to ‘use his influence’ to stop prosecutions. During the summer, the new prosecutor-general of Ukraine opens an investigation into Burisma

February 2015: Senior diplomat George Kent, on temporary assignment to Kyiv, learns of Hunter’s role. He phones a staffer at Biden’s office to it could ‘create perception of a conflict of interest.’ That month Viktor Shokin takes office as Ukraine’s prosecutor general, despite already being the subject of questions about his own links to corruption

April 17: Email from Hunter’s laptop shows Pozharskyi writing Hunter: ‘thank you for inviting me to DC and giving an opportunity to meet your father and spent some together.’ 

Summer: The Burisma investigation appears to become dormant 

January 2016: Biden travels to Ukraine amid mounting international disgust at Shokin failing to tackle corruption. One of the concerns raised by the European Union and IMF is that he has failed to investigate Burisma. Biden tells Poroshenko he needs to go. He later boasts: ‘I looked at them and said: I’m leaving in six hours. If the prosecutor is not fired, you’re not getting the money. Well, son of a bitch. He got fired.’ Shokin in fact is finally removed from office in March after internal turmoil in Kyiv

2018: Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani starts ‘investigating’ the Bidens’ links to Ukraine, enlisting the help of Lev Parnas and Igor Fruman, who are now indicted on fraud charges. Ukraine’s latest prosecutor general announces he will investigate Burisma early the next year 

April 12, 2019: Hunter – or a man saying he is Hunter – takes three damaged Macs to John Paul MacIsaac’s Apple repair shop in Wilmington, Delaware. MacIsaac puts data from one on a new hard drive

April 25: Joe Biden announces presidential run

July 11: The laptops have not been picked up and are now considered ‘abandoned’ according to MacIsaac’s terms and conditions

Summer: MacIsaac claims he becomes worried about what he has seen on the laptop whose contents he put on a disk, and thinks he might be killed by a Biden associate for having it in his shop

Fall: MacIsaac either contacts the FBI or is contacted by them; he has said both

December 9 or 19: The FBI pick up the laptop, but MacIsaac has made a copy for himself. Giuliani later says the shopowner has made four. They give him a grand jury subpoena to hand it over, even though he was going to anyway

Early January 2020: The FBI tell MacIsaac not to talk to anyone and to stall if a Biden representative comes to get the laptop back 

 

February: Trump is acquitted at end of his impeachment trial

May: On Giuliani’s account, MacIsaac hands over the hard drive to Robert Costello, Giuliani’s attorney, by this month at the latest as well as trying to give it to other Republicans 

September: Steve Bannon, Trump’s ex-aide and now indicted on fraud charges, tells New York Post about existence of laptop

September 28: Bannon boasts to a Dutch TV interviewer ‘I have Hunter’s hard drive’

October 11: Giuliani gives Post the hard drive

October 14: Post publishes emails and partially-clothed pictures of Hunter from the laptop – one of them with an apparent crack pipe – and says it has an 11-minute sex-and-drugs video. Giuliani promises there is ‘more to come,’ Republican senators promise to investigate but Democrats say the former New York mayor has ‘paraded with Russian agents’



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