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Headline USA

Christening photo goes viral due to the appearance of a “divine sign” | The State

For those who are believers in the existence of God, hehe photograph of a baptism has generated great sensation among the Catholic community, since something extraordinary happened that many have described as a “divine sign” of the Creator’s presence.

It turns out that A photographer named María Silva Salles was hired by a family from Córdoba, Spain, to capture with her lens one of the most important moments in the life of her son Valentino: his baptism.

Little Valentino Mora received this sacrament in the Parish Church of the Asunción de Nuestra Señora de Córdoba. Silva was attentive to the entire ceremony and was shooting his lens at all times so as not to miss any detail.

Just as he was reviewing the images, he was shocked to see something extremely extraordinary while the little one received the baptismal water: the holy liquid that fell from the baby’s head had formed a rosary.

Some consider that it could be an editing trick; However, the photographer clarified that she carried out the session with a film camera, so the photo did not have any digital process.

But for those who profess the Catholic faith, this fact has a special meaning when considering that this baby surely has a very important mission in life to fulfill.

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Headline USA

Venice floods: St Mark’s Square swamped with water after heavy rain

Venice has been flooded with water once again as officials warn of a ‘terrible situation’ a year after the city suffered a billion pounds of damage during high tides. 

Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning, catching the authorities off guard before they could activate the huge flood barriers that were rolled out just two months ago.

Those tides then reached a 145 cm peak as strong sirocco winds blew in from Croatia and two rivers flooded near the sea around the historic Italian city.

The system of 78 flood gates, known as Mose, guard the entrance to the Venetian lagoon and are designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft). However, they require 48-hours notice to be activated.

Weather bulletins in past days had forecast rainfall pushing sea levels up to 120 centimetres, below the 130 cm threshold at which the flood barriers are operated.

A woman in a red dress on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, following following heavy rains and strong winds 

People walk across a flooded street on Tuesday in Venice. Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

People walk across a flooded street on Tuesday in Venice. Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8. Waters are expected to rise to a maximum of 145cm later today, according to local authorities

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8. Waters are expected to rise to a maximum of 145cm later today, according to local authorities

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8

People walk across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, following heavy rains and strong winds

People walk across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, following heavy rains and strong winds

A couple walks holding hands  in flooded St. Mark's Square

A couple walks holding hands  in flooded St. Mark’s Square

Video footage taken in the city shows the iconic St Mark’s Square, or Piazza San Marco, swamped with flood water. 

Carlo Alberto Tessein, procurator of the Basilica of San Marco, described the situation as ‘terrible’ and said the water had got inside the historic building, risking damage.  

The city’s mayor, Luigi Brugnaro, wrote on Twitter: ‘3.10pm… Now I’m at the Centro Maree to follow the development of the situation. Next maximum 145 cm at 16:40, due to the anomalous wind reinforcement. The MOSE system is not active.’  

Brugnaro said that the weather had suddenly worsened and water had reached a 145 cm peak as strong sirocco winds blew in from Croatia and two rivers flooded near the sea around Venice.  

He called for more rapid and reactive protocols in the operation of Mose in order to face sudden weather changes.

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

People take photos in the middle of a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8

People take photos in the middle of a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8

People walk in flooded St. Mark's Square during high tide

People walk in flooded St. Mark’s Square during high tide

People were seen riding a traditional boat in a flooded street in Venice, Italy

People were seen riding a traditional boat in a flooded street in Venice, Italy

Workers are seen in the flooded St. Mark's Square during high tide

Workers are seen in the flooded St. Mark’s Square during high tide

A person poses for a photo in flooded St. Mark's Square

A person poses for a photo in flooded St. Mark’s Square

‘The situation is terrible, we are under water,’ said Carlo Alberto Tesserin, responsible for managing Saint Mark’s Basilica, adding that if the water rose further all the internal chapels would be flooded.

The centre for tidal forecasts in the Venice area said the water would recede to 120 cm on Wednesday and be back up to 135 cm on Thursday.

High tides, or ‘acqua alta’ in Italian, have been regular occurrences in Venice over the years, caused by a combination of factors exacerbated by climate change – from rising sea levels and unusually high tides to land subsidence that has caused the ground level of the city to sink.

Of the 24 tides ever recorded above the 140-cm level, 15 have occurred in the last two decades, including five last November when the city’s St Mark’s Square was submerged under a metre of water.

Designed in 1984, construction of the multi-billion euro Mose project started in 2003 but was plagued by delays, corruption and cost overruns. The 78 yellow barriers were tested in July and then first raised in October. 

People walk across an shopping arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

People walk across an shopping arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

A woman clears her flooded shop on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A woman clears her flooded shop on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

Heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise. Pictured two people in umbrellas walking in St. Mark's Square

Heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise. Pictured two people in umbrellas walking in St. Mark’s Square

It comes after Venice was hit by flooding three times last year – twice in November and once in December – causing a billion euros in damage. 

In November 2019, Italy declared a state of emergency after floods brought carnage to the city, flooding its historic basilica and leaving ‘widespread devastation’. 

Venice authorities said the damage last year ran to hundreds of millions of pounds, including millions in St Mark’s Basilica alone.

A man walks across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A man walks across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on December 8

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on December 8

A shop owner protects water from getting in on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

A shop owner protects water from getting in on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square by the Doge's Palace and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on Tuesday

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square by the Doge’s Palace and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on Tuesday

People walking past the Rialto Bridge during high tide

People walking past the Rialto Bridge during high tide

People standing inside a flooded cafe as flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

People standing inside a flooded cafe as flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

The system of 78 flood gates designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft) requires 48-hours notice to be activated. Pictured people walking in a flooded street

The system of 78 flood gates designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft) requires 48-hours notice to be activated. Pictured people walking in a flooded street

Venice archbishop Francesco Moraglia said at the time that the church had suffered ‘irreparable damage’ and the crypt was flooded for just the second time in its history.

The high waters in 2019 brought misery to local residents – stranding boats and gondolas, battering shops and hotels and leaving many of the city’s squares and alleyways deep underwater. 

In June this year, a quarter of Venice was submerged by a near-record high tide, at a time of year when such flooding is rare.

The flooding in summer came just two days after Italy reopened its borders to tourists in an attempt to salvage its summer season following coronavirus lockdown.

Previous times Venice has flooded 

A woman crosses the flooded St Mark's Square on November 13, 2019, where Venice's 1,200-year-old basilica (pictured behind her) was flooded by the high tide

A woman crosses the flooded St Mark’s Square on November 13, 2019, where Venice’s 1,200-year-old basilica (pictured behind her) was flooded by the high tide 

Venice was hit by flooding three times last year – twice in November and once in December – causing a billion euros in damage.

On November 12, 2019, the city was devastated by an acqua alta that reached 187 centimeters, with almost 90% of the city flooding. 

The northern Italian city of canals was hit by the highest tide in more than 50 years last year, with tourists wading through flooded streets to seek shelter as a fierce wind whipped up waves in St. Mark’s Square.

The exceptionally intense ‘acqua alta,’ or high waters, peaked at 1.87 metres (six feet) on November 12, 2019, according to the tide monitoring centre.

In November 2019, Italy declared a state of emergency after floods brought carnage to the city, flooding its historic basilica and leaving ‘widespread devastation’. 

Venice authorities said the damage last year ran to hundreds of millions of pounds, including millions in St Mark’s Basilica alone.

Venice archbishop Francesco Moraglia said at the time that the church had suffered ‘irreparable damage’ and the crypt was flooded for just the second time in its history. 

The high waters in 2019 brought misery to local residents – stranding boats and gondolas, battering shops and hotels and leaving many of the city’s squares and alleyways deep underwater. 

 

 

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Entertainment USA

Stay Hydrated With These Top-Selling Smart Water Bottles That Track Your Water Intake

Looking for the best smart water bottle to keep you hydrated 24/7? It’s impossible to miss a sip with these six choices, which are all built with special technology that monitor how much water you’re actually drinking!

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UAE

Dubai cuts fuel surcharge for electricity and water


The Dewa headquarters. The savings achieved in fuel consumption as a result of the increase in solar energy production will be passed to customers.
Image Credit: Supplied

Dubai: In yet another step towards improving the competitiveness of Dubai, the Emirate’s Supreme Council of Energy has announced a new reduction in the fuel surcharge for electricity and water.

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, Chairman of the Dubai Supreme Council of Energy, issued a decision to reduce the fuel surcharge for electricity and water.

Accordingly, fuel surcharge for electricity will be 5 fils for kilowatt hour instead of 6.5 fils currently. Fuel surcharge for water will be 0.4 fils for Imperial Gallon instead of 0.6 fils currently.

The decision comes in line with the directives of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, to increase the share of renewable and clean energy in Dubai’s energy mix.

It also reflects the Supreme Council’s commitment to enhancing Dubai’s prestigious position in providing electricity and water services at globally-competitive prices. The savings achieved in fuel consumption as a result of the increase in solar energy production will be passed to customers. The fuel surcharge reduction will be applied on electricity and water bills from December 1 2020.

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Vice-Chairman of the Dubai Supreme Council of Energy and MD and CEO of Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (Dewa) said: “At Dewa, we work in line with the vision and directives of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid to increase the share of renewable and clean energy and provide 75 per cent of Dubai’s energy capacity from clean energy sources by 2050 through the Dubai Clean Energy Strategy 2050.

In light of the increase in the share of clean energy capacity in Dubai’s energy mix to around 9 per cent, fuel consumption has decreased. These savings will be reflected in customers’ bills. The Dubai Supreme Council of Energy’s decision to reduce the fuel surcharge for electricity and water underlines the wise leadership’s keenness to ensure a decent life for the residents of Dubai.”



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UAE

DEWA bill savings: Dubai cuts fuel surcharge for electricity and water


The Dewa headquarters. The savings achieved in fuel consumption as a result of the increase in solar energy production will be passed to customers.
Image Credit: Supplied

Dubai: In yet another step towards improving the competitiveness of Dubai, the Emirate’s Supreme Council of Energy has announced a new reduction in the fuel surcharge for electricity and water.

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, Chairman of the Dubai Supreme Council of Energy, issued a decision to reduce the fuel surcharge for electricity and water.

Accordingly, fuel surcharge for electricity will be 5 fils for kilowatt hour instead of 6.5 fils currently. Fuel surcharge for water will be 0.4 fils for Imperial Gallon instead of 0.6 fils currently.

The decision comes in line with the directives of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, to increase the share of renewable and clean energy in Dubai’s energy mix.

It also reflects the Supreme Council’s commitment to enhancing Dubai’s prestigious position in providing electricity and water services at globally-competitive prices. The savings achieved in fuel consumption as a result of the increase in solar energy production will be passed to customers. The fuel surcharge reduction will be applied on electricity and water bills from December 1 2020.

Saeed Mohammed Al Tayer, Vice-Chairman of the Dubai Supreme Council of Energy and MD and CEO of Dubai Electricity and Water Authority (Dewa) said: “At Dewa, we work in line with the vision and directives of Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid to increase the share of renewable and clean energy and provide 75 per cent of Dubai’s energy capacity from clean energy sources by 2050 through the Dubai Clean Energy Strategy 2050.

In light of the increase in the share of clean energy capacity in Dubai’s energy mix to around 9 per cent, fuel consumption has decreased. These savings will be reflected in customers’ bills. The Dubai Supreme Council of Energy’s decision to reduce the fuel surcharge for electricity and water underlines the wise leadership’s keenness to ensure a decent life for the residents of Dubai.”



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UAE

Al Dahra, Israel’s Watergen sign strategic partnership in water security


Abu Dhabi-headquartered Al Dahra Agricultural Company and Israel’s Watergen have signed a strategic partnership in the field of water security on Thursday.
Image Credit: WAM

ABU DHABI, 26th November, 2020 (WAM) — Al Dahra Holding Company, an Abu Dhabi-based producer of essential animal feed and food products, signed a strategic partnership agreement in the area of water security with the Israeli company, Watergen, developer of water-from-air solutions.

The agreement was signed in Abu Dhabi by Khadim Al Darei, Vice-Chairman and Co-founder of Al Dahra Holding Company, and Michael Mirilashvili, CEO and President of Watergen.

The agreement aims to establish a strategic partnership between the two sides to produce water from the air, creating a renewable source of pure water for human and agricultural consumption.

The two sides agreed to establish a permanent centre in Abu Dhabi for manufacturing and distributing drinking and irrigation water production equipment. Watergen developed a pioneering technology to produce water from the air and patented the world’s most energy-efficient atmospheric water generator, AWG.

The agreement was concluded after the UAE company delegation visited Israel in October 2020, following the peace accord between the UAE and Israel, to encourage cooperation and strategic partnerships between the two countries, Al Darei said, noting that the company’s delegation met with representatives of Israeli companies operating in the sectors of agriculture, water and technology.

During the visit, Al Dahra signed a Memorandum of Understanding, MoU, with Watergen covering an advanced technology for producing water from the air, while will help provide large quantities of drinking water, as well as water used in the irrigation of farms, parks, reserves, ranches and remote areas, he added. An AWG can produce up to 5,000 litres of water per day for drinking and irrigation purposes.

“Amidst the concern for environmental issues around the world, especially in the UAE, environmental indexes are now being prioritised by developed countries. Therefore, Al Dahra aims to find sustainable and comprehensive environmental solutions that will protect the environment and support sustainable development programmes in the UAE,” he stressed.

He explained that the technology will enable many sectors to benefit from a renewable water source and create promising economic solutions for providing environment-friendly water, instead of digging wells or water desalination.

“Our visit to Abu Dhabi is due to the long-awaited Abraham Accord, which was signed by the UAE and Israel to establish stability in the region and normalise the ties between the two countries,” Mirilashvili said.

Watergen will showcase its technology in the UAE, to be promoted in the rest of the region, he added, stressing that Watergen’s products will reduce the use of plastics and directly affect the environments of the UAE and other countries.

Watergen, which was founded in 2009, is operates in many countries around the world and aims, through its collaboration with Al Dahra Holding Company, to advance its strategic project to increase productivity and decrease cost. The five-year collaborative project will developed and adjusted to accommodate the UAE desert environment.

Watergen has three main atmospheric water generators, AWGs, depending on the requirements of the situation. Each unit contains an internal water treatment system and can operate without any special infrastructure, which only require an electricity source except a source of electricity.

The large scale AWG is an industrial scale atmospheric water generator designed for towns, villages, factories, off-grid settlements and rural communities, which can produce up to 5,000 litres of water per day. They can also be installed on rooftops, helping to decentralise the supply of safe-drinking water in municipalities that have insufficient water infrastructure.

AWGs of up to 800 litres of water per day and 30 litres of water per day are used in households and offices respectively.



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Headline USA

Baby dies after mother burned her with boiling water | The State



A 26-year-old young mother, originally from Mansfield, UK, has been brought before the court of her city after being found guilty of having caused the death of her baby of only 19 months.

It all happened on March 6, when Katie Crowder called emergency services for help after her daughter Gracie had an “accident.”

According to the information released by Daily Mail, Upon arriving at the scene of the emergency, paramedics discovered that the baby had severe burns on 65% of her body.

In her first statement to the authorities, Katie indicated that she did not know what had happened, because she had only left her baby alone for a few minutes to clean up some disasters made by her dog and when she entered the house, she discovered little Grace mouth down in the bathroom, next to a bucket with boiling water with water.

After several investigations, the prosecutor Sally Howe came to the conclusion that Crowder had deliberately murdered her daughter, due to the woman’s responses in her statements and because she allowed more than an hour to pass before calling the emergency services.

In addition, the mother underwent a toxicological test, which showed that had a lot of cocaine in the blood 4 hours after the incident, so she was completely drugged when Gracie died.

Also, the prosecutor Howe indicated that Katie had made some comments against her own daughter such as that she needed to take her to daycare, and she also constantly complained that she did not let her rest.

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Canada

Lead in water: 300 fountains to be replaced in schools in the Gaspé


Nearly 300 water points in Gaspé schools have a lead level that exceeds Health Canada standards and will need to be replaced.

At the René-Lévesque School Service Center, one of the two school service centers in the Gaspé, 207 equipment out of 470, or more than 40%, must be replaced in elementary schools. As for the high schools in the territory, that is, the Baie-des-Chaleurs sector, the tests are still underway.

In the other school service center in the region, the Chic-Chocs center, 91 of the 445 fountains in all schools, primary and secondary, exceed the established limit of 5 micrograms per liter. In this case, we are talking about more than 20% of the fountains to be replaced.

At the René-Lévesque School Services Center, the Director General, Louis Bujold, believes that simple work will correct the situation. “This should be done fairly quickly as these are just equipment changes and not changes to our water supply system,” said Bujold.

The cost estimate for the replacement remains to be determined.

As for the Chic-Chocs School Services Center, which manages the school network in the Gaspé and Haute-Gaspé regions, the tests were carried out realistically, it was announced on Thursday. “We tested the fountains towards the end of containment. The water had been stagnant for several weeks. This way, we had the worst conditions, which gives us confidence on our results, ”explained the director of material resources, David Smith.

The costs to bring the fountains up to standard are estimated at around $ 500,000.

Both service centers will be able to use the funds dedicated to upgrading buildings to make the fixes.



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Entertainment USA

‘The Masked Singer’s Serpent Admits He Felt Like ‘A Fish Out Of Water’ Performing On TV For 1st Time Ever


The Nov. 18 episode of ‘The Masked Singer’ featured a double unmasking. HL spoke EXCLUSIVELY with the singer underneath the Serpent costume after he was revealed to the world. Spoilers!

The Masked Singer shocked us with a double reveal during the Group B finals on Nov. 18. The Whatchamacallit was revealed as NBA star Lonzo Ball, while “Singing Surgeon” Dr. Elvis Francois was revealed to be the Serpent. Dr. Elvis has become an internet sensation because of his amazing covers of songs that have uplifted us all during this pandemic. HollywoodLife talked EXCLUSIVELY with Dr. Elvis about his Masked Singer journey.

Dr. Elvis, an orthopedic surgeon resident at the Mayo Clinic, told HollywoodLife that he “felt like a fish out of water” on set because he’d never performed on a stage before. He also revealed the meaningful reason why he chose the Serpent costume, and how the show did in terms of following health and safety protocols during the pandemic.

How did you end up on The Masked Singer of all places? 
Dr. Elvis Francois: I’ve been asking myself that every day. So it’s been a crazy, crazy year for all of us, myself included. Everyone on the show is a celebrity. I’m not a celebrity. I’m not an entertainer or a professional musician. I wouldn’t call myself a musician, but earlier this year, me and a buddy of mine were playing some music at the hospital and that video became a viral thing on the internet, I guess you’d say. I had the opportunity of doing some cover songs after that, and the producers at Fox reached out and gave me the opportunity to do some cover songs for the After the Mask show. And then they reached out and asked if I’d like to be a contestant on The Masked Singer, which was crazy because I grew up always watching music competitions. I’m a huge fan of the show and been watching all the previous seasons. When they asked me I was like, this whole year has been surreal for a number of reasons, but that was definitely the most surreal moment of all. It’s something that was a once in a lifetime opportunity. And the rest is what brings us here today.

There are a ton of costume ideas to choose from, so how did you settle on the Serpent costume? 
Dr. Elvis Francois: Again, I think this whole process of even ending up on the show just felt like a series of unlikely events that kept happening. It felt like it was meant to be. When I saw that costume, I kid you not, our very first thought was this is 100 percent me. I don’t know if you’re familiar with the medical symbol, the Caduceus with the staff and the serpents, they go around it. So the medical symbol itself has a lot of historic mythological meaning that is derived from serpents. The costume was incredibly cool. The animatronics in the snake looked really cool. The fact that it had this underlying meaning for medicine was almost meant to be. It was as almost if you had to create the perfect costume for my role in medicine, this would be it.

After you were unmasked, Ken Jeong teared up over how much of an impact your music has had over the past few months. How did you feel when you saw him tearing up? 
Dr. Elvis Francois: I started getting emotional myself when I realized the gravity of what it meant to be on that stage. Hearing his words and realizing that so many of us have family members who were directly impacted or indirectly impacted and how a little bit of music can go a long way in putting a smile on a person’s face or making someone feel a little bit better about their day. It was incredible to hear him express those things. I was happy to be representing the millions of other health care providers on the frontlines who couldn’t be there that day. I was happy to hear him say those things because there are many people in medicine and at the hospital that I work at and in hospitals across the country who are fans of the show. Having an opportunity to just step out of the hospital, away from the craziness that we see in politics and the news with the death counts of COVID, and just kind of relax, smile, and hang out, those were all the thoughts that I was thinking as Ken was talking. My last thought was, don’t cry. I had to sing one more song, and I thought I may not even be able to get through it. There were a lot of emotions.

The panelists were guessing people like Taye Diggs and Leslie Odom Jr. How did it feel to be put in the same league as them? 
Dr. Elvis Francois: I can’t emphasize enough how much I felt like a fish out of water. I had never performed on stage like that. I had never performed for a large audience. I’d never performed live on television. I’d never done a choreographed performance while trying to sing a song. I’m not an entertainer in any way. I’m a training surgeon. When I was on stage after finishing the first song, I almost passed out because it’s super hot in the costume. We also can’t see, so I was standing there, and I didn’t know how I did. The panelists threw out those names, and it was humbling. Those are people that I listen to and have such an amazing amount of respect for, so it was really cool to hear their guesses.

Dr. Elvis Francois performing as the Serpent. (FOX)

This season, there are so many extra precautions to protect the cast and crew due to the COVID-19 pandemic. As a doctor yourself, how did you feel the show did with the health and safety protocols?
Dr. Elvis Francois: The first thing I’ll say is the people at FOX did an incredible job. Personally knowing firsthand the guidelines that the CDC has put together, being at a hospital every single day, and knowing what it takes to make sure that people are following appropriate distancing guidelines, I had never been tested more for anything than my time on set of The Masked Singer. It was really, really incredible. It was incredible to see them take that as seriously from the person who’s handing out water bottles to the lead producer. Everyone did their part, and it was successful because no one ended up getting sick. There were no reported cases. So I’d give him an A-plus for the job that they did. It was pretty amazing. 

You released an EP to support health care workers on the frontlines. In the future, are you looking to maybe pursue music in addition to your medical career?
Dr. Elvis Francois: That’s a great question. Several months ago, I just enjoyed sharing music. That was something that I was personally passionate about just because I love music that has meaning. Over the past few months seeing how with surgery you can only help the person who’s on the table, with music you can cross oceans and help a much wider group of people. It’s the next step for me to work on writing and creating some original music. I’m hoping to be able to find a way to share both music and medicine for as long as I’m able to.





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UAE

Toddler critical after falling into bucket of water in Khor Fakkan


Sharjah Police’s unit at the hospital alerted the force about the incident. Picture for illustrative purposes only.
Image Credit: Sharjah Police

Sharjah: A baby girl has been admitted to the ICU of a hospital after falling into a bucket of water at her family’s home in Khor Fakkan, Gulf News has learnt

The 11-month-old girl fell into a bucket of water that was placed in the bathroom of the house. The bucket was being used for cleaning purposes. The incident was reported to Khor Fakkan police by the police office at the hospital. The baby girl was later transferred to Al Qassimi Hospital in Sharjah on Sunday night.

Police said the girl was moving alone without supervision. The family lives in Khor Fakkan.

The toddler, identified as S.Y.A., was discovered by the family members and then taken to the hospital emergency section. Medical sources told Gulf News the girl was brought to the hospital in a serious condition. The girl was kept in ICU under observation.

Officials urged parents to keep their eyes closely on their children and never leave them alone, especially in this age. Police called upon all home owners to keep these buckets in a safe place far from children and secure their places to avoid any tragic accident which might happen.

Police said that the investigation has found no evidence of foul play. The case is being looked into by Wasit Police.



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