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The Buzz

Water level 53% below normal in Punjab dams


Tribune News Service

Chandigarh, December 25

The water level in major reservoirs across the northern region remains low this year, with the present storage being 53 per cent below normal in Punjab and 25 per cent below normal in HP.

The current water level in the Thein Dam reservoir on the Ravi in Punjab is 498.35 m against the upper limit of 527.91 m with the available storage being 0.567 billion cubic meters (BCM), according to the data released by the Central Water Commission (CWC) yesterday. This means the available storage at Thein is only 24 per cent of its total capacity. The figure was 69 per cent at this time last year, while the average storage during the past 10 years was 52 per cent.

At Bhakra Dam on the Sutlej in Himachal Pradesh, the water level was 492.40 m against the maximum of 512.06 m, with the water holding being 2.898 BCM. This implies the current storage is 47 per cent, against last year’s 67 per cent and 10-year average of 69 per cent.

Pong Dam on the Beas in Himachal recorded the water level at 410.62 m against the maximum of 423.67 m. The current storage of 3.012 BCM is 49 per cent of its total capacity, which was 72 per cent last year and average 58 per cent over the past 10 years.





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UAE

UAE weather alert: Rough seas tomorrow, avoid water sports

Water sports must be avoided in the Arabian Gulftomorrow, says NCM. For illustrative purposes only.
Image Credit: Gulf News

Dubai: The National Centre of Meteorology (NCM) has issued a weather alert along the Arabian Gulf till tomorrow evening as the sea will continue to remain very rough, a weather forecaster said on Friday.

The official Ahmed Al Kabi told Gulf News, “We have issued a sea warning and it is advisable to avoid water sports or any other activity on the seas.”

He said the wave heights on shore ranged between 2-3ft, reaching 4ft sometimes, while the off shore height hovered between 6-8ft, reaching 11 ft at times.

He said the weather tonight will continue to be cloudy in general, with north westerly wind speeds at 20-30km per hour, reaching 50km per hour.

“The weather will be the same tomorrow till afternoon,” he added.

The lowest temperature recorded today was 6.2 degrees Celsius at Raknah, north of Al Ain, while the maximum temperature was 27.3 degrees Celsius at Kalba, Fujairah.

The minimum temperature tomorrow will be in the range of 6-9 degrees Celsius while the maximum temperature will be between 21 and 25 degrees Celsius, he noted.

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UAE

UAE weather alert: Rough seas Saturday, avoid water sports

Water sports must be avoided in the Arabian Gulftomorrow, says NCM. For illustrative purposes only.
Image Credit: Gulf News

Dubai: The National Centre of Meteorology (NCM) has issued a weather alert along the Arabian Gulf till Saturday evening as the sea will continue to remain very rough, a weather forecaster said on Friday.

The official Ahmed Al Kabi told Gulf News, “We have issued a sea warning and it is advisable to avoid water sports or any other activity on the seas.”

He said the wave heights on shore ranged between 2-3ft, reaching 4ft sometimes, while the off shore height hovered between 6-8ft, reaching 11 ft at times.

He said the weather tonight will continue to be cloudy in general, with north westerly wind speeds at 20-30km per hour, reaching 50km per hour.

“The weather will be the same tomorrow till afternoon,” he added.

The lowest temperature recorded today was 6.2 degrees Celsius at Raknah, north of Al Ain, while the maximum temperature was 27.3 degrees Celsius at Kalba, Fujairah.

The minimum temperature tomorrow will be in the range of 6-9 degrees Celsius while the maximum temperature will be between 21 and 25 degrees Celsius, he noted.

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UAE

New York University Abu Dhabi sets up three more research centres to study water, human behaviour and art

The New York University Abu Dhabi.
Image Credit: Gulf News Archives

Abu Dhabi: On its tenth anniversary, New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) has launched three new research centres focused on water research, human behaviour, and art and art history.

The Water Research Centre, the Centre for Behavioural Institutional Design and the Arab Centre for the Study of Art will join the institution’s 16 other research centres to advance knowledge in their respective fields.

The Water Research Centre (NYUAD-WRC) will focus on the critical role of water, which is linked to many global societal issues such as health, food security, the economy and public policy. Growing scarcity demands novel solutions for managing existing water resources and increasing supply, which are also some of the objectives of the UAE Water Security Strategy 2036. NYUAD-WRC will be led by Engineering professor, Dr Nidal Hilal, along with co-principal investigators, Mechanical Engineering professor, Dr Raed Hashaikeh, Chemistry programme head and Chemistry associate professor, Dr Ali Trabolsi, and Environmental Studies programme head and Biology associate professor, Dr John Burt.

NYUAD-Water-Research-Center-1608881664786
The Water Research Centre (NYUAD-WRC) will focus on the critical role of water, which is linked to many global societal issues such as health, food security, the economy and public policy.
Image Credit: Supplied

“The NYUAD-WRC will seek to place the UAE in a leading position for cutting-edge research and development in water technologies, in line with the country’s vision for water security and the efficient use of resources,” Dr Hilal said.

The Center for Behavioural Institutional design (CBID) will be led by principal investigators Global Network Economics professor, Dr Nikos Nikiforakis, and Global Network Economics professor, Dr John Wooders, along with co-principal investigators, Economics associate professor, Dr Olivier Bochet and of Economics associate professor, Dr Ernesto Reuben.

The long-term goal is to construct empirically validated models of human behaviour, using them to design and implement policies and institutions that will improve social welfare. “The potential public and societal impact of CBID is clearly substantial at a time when the Abu Dhabi government is looking to incorporate insights from behavioural social science in policymaking and establish a Behavioural Unit,” Dr Nikiforakis said.

The new Arab Centre for the Study of Art will build upon recent calls to decentre cultural histories and social theory. It will move both research and pedagogy beyond the established canons of art history by investigating the histories of art from the region. It will be led by principal investigator, Practice of Art History associate professor, Dr Salwa Mikdadi, and co-principal investigators, Literature and Art History professor, Dr Shamoon Zamir, and Social Research and Public Policy assistant professor, Dr May Al-Dabbagh.

Image 1 - Plan for Greater Baghdad by Ala Younis. Photo by Alessandra Chemollo. Courtesy la Biennale di Venezia 3-1608881662907
Plan for Greater Baghdad by Ala Younis. The new Arab Centre for the Study of Art will build upon recent calls to decentre cultural histories and social theory.
Image Credit: Supplied

“We aim to become a major resource and contributor to the study of art of the Arab World and the cultural exchange with countries in Western Asia. The Centre’s programme and research projects will contribute to a theoretical framework that is grounded in the region’s culture for teaching at the undergraduate and graduate level,” Dr Mikdadi said.

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Canada

Contaminated water in Shannon: Supreme Court rejects Ottawa’s application for leave to appeal

The Supreme Court of Canada has just rendered its decision in the contaminated water case in Shannon, and it has dismissed the federal government’s application for leave to appeal.

The latter asked the highest Canadian court to review the decision awarding $ 200 million in damages to citizens, since he believed that the Shannon judgment, if upheld, could have a “crippling effect” on government activities and generate an avalanche of environmental lawsuits.

More details to come …

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The Buzz

SYL water issue: Abhay Chautala says Haryana should block borders with Punjab


Chandigarh, December 22

INLD leader Abhay Singh Chautala on Tuesday said Haryana should block its borders with Punjab, stopping the movement of people and goods, till the neighbouring state gives its share of the Sutlej-Yamuna Link (SYL) water.

The Indian National Lok Dal leader said they will support the ML Khattar government if it decides to force Punjab over the demand.

“Let the government take the decision today. We will support them till the time we do not get our rightful share of water. We will not allow anyone to enter through Haryana’s borders with Punjab,” Chautala told reporters here.

“We will stop the movement of goods going into that state from here till we get our share of water. Let them make a decision,” the Ellenabad MLA said.

He said that over the years, the INLD has been constantly making efforts so that Haryana gets its “rightful share of water”.

He recalled that three years ago, his party workers had blocked all entry points to Punjab “to make them realise that if they stop our share of water we will not allow them to enter Haryana”.

Chautala, the younger son of INLD president and former Chief Minister OP Chautala, said the BJP has been in power for six years in Haryana but it never showed any seriousness on the SYL issue.

He said that amid the protests of farmers against the Centre’s new farm laws, the state BJP leadership was raising the SYL issue “to divide the peasants but that is not going to happen. Farmers will make the Centre repeal the agri laws”.

Chautala claimed that some BJP leaders from the state were now enacting a “drama” of staging “upwas” (fast) demonstrations in support of SYL.

“Why did they not think of sitting on ‘upwas’ all these years even though the Supreme Court had ruled in Haryana’s favour on SYL. Now they only want to divert the attention of people. BJP’s mindset has always been to create a divide among people and keep the issues to linger on,” he said.

“Had the chief minister been so concerned on the water issue, why would he allow his government to scrap Dadupur Nalvi canal project, on which Rs 340 crore had already been spent and which would have been particularly beneficial to help irrigate lands in Ambala, Kurukshetra and Yamunanagar,” the INLD leader said.

He questioned why Haryana BJP president OP Dhankar, who was agriculture minister in the previous term of the Khattar government, did not show concern on SYL then.

“Earlier, when we used to raise the SYL issue, they would say that the matter was pending before the Supreme Court. But now when the apex court has ruled in our favour, why is this government doing drama of ‘upwas’. Governments don’t sit on ‘upwas’, they take decisions,” he said.

Opposing the SYL canal project, Punjab Chief Minister Amarinder Singh had recently warned that “Punjab will burn” if the state is forced to share water with Haryana.

SYL has been a contentious issue between the two states, with the Punjab portion of the canal still incomplete. The construction began in 1982.

Punjab has been demanding a reassessment of the Ravi-Beas river waters’ volume, while Haryana has been seeking completion of the SYL canal to get its share of 3.5 million acre-feet (MAF). 

Chautala asserted that the party is “solidly behind farmers” fighting against the three laws. 

Responding to a question, Chautala said he will not take another minute to resign as a legislative assembly member if farmers make such a demand.                 

“Chaudhary Devi Lal’s blood runs in my veins, I will not take a minute to resign..,” he said.

Asked that couple of Independent MLAs had withdrawn support to the Khattar government while many JJP legislators too had openly come out in support of the farmers, he claimed the coalition government will not last long.

“This ‘jugad’ (arrangement with MLAs from JJP, Independents supporting it) will not work. Even some of the BJP MLAs are upset with the government…This government will fall like Bansi Lal-led dispensation,” he said. — PTI





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Headline USA

What Happens To Your Body When You Get Dehydrated (And How Long Can You Go Without Water) | The opinion

The river was not very far. Chaz Powell could see the Zambezi just a few hundred yards down the gorge. It was tantalizingly close, but out of reach.

“I can’t describe how thirsty I was,” says Powell.

Had run out of water and had no way to go down to the river. “I was starting to feel really bad,” he says. “My body temperature was crazy.”

Powell, UK expedition guide, was about to experience what it’s like to be stranded without the comfort that most of us take for granted.

In most developed countries, accessing safe water is as simple as turning on a tap.

But around 1.1 billion people lack access to safe water worldwide, and a total of 2.700 million have difficulties to achieve it for at least one month of the year.

Getty Images
Around 1.1 billion people lack access to safe water worldwide

And when we run out of water, things can get ugly very quickly.

Powell experienced this on a solitary expedition along the Zambezi River in Africa, having started his journey in Zambia.

Other route

It was August 2016, the hottest time of the year, with temperatures reaching 50 ° C during the day.

Powell, who was then 38 years old, had to walk to avoid the Barotse floodplains, submerged for 90% of the time.

It was going well. He had managed to travel an average of 36 kilometers a day.

But once in the Zambezi River Gorge, Powell slowed considerably. “I started doing no more than two miles a day,” he recalls.

At such a slow pace, Powell calculated that it would take him a month to reach the other end of the gorge, and he was starting to run out of food.

So I needed to find another route.

One day at four in the morning, Powell started out of the gorge with two two-liter bottles of Zambezi water.

When he started walking, the temperature was already 48 ° C. Three hours later he managed to get out of the gorge, after climbing between 750 meters and a kilometer. Until then, he had one bottle of water left.

But when he reached the top, the terrain was not what he expected.

“It was completely covered in thorns and it was just a series of little hills that went down into the gorge,” says Powell. After three hours of walking, he ran out of water completely.

“So I decided that I was going to try to go back down,” he says. But he was no longer in the same place he had climbed and there was no way to descend.

Onset of dehydration

On average, water makes up about 60-70% of the human body.

Our body loses water through urine, sweat, feces and breath, so we have to continually replace it. If we don’t, we can become dehydrated.

The first stage of dehydration is thirst, which is activated when 2% of body weight is lost.

“The body holds on to all the remaining moisture,” says Dileep Lobo, professor of gastrointestinal surgery at the University of Nottingham, UK, who researches fluid and electrolyte balance.

“To maintain oxygen levels, your heart rate increases,” he adds.

The rate at which dehydration occurs varies depending on the conditions the body is subjected to.

“Human beings have a limit of tolerance for heat. When we get over it, we suffer heat stress and even death, ”says Lobo.

“Mortality rates increase on extremely cold days, but increase much more on extremely hot days.”

Even mild dehydration can make us feel more tired and less able to function physically.

As we lose more water our ability to cool ourselves through sweat also decreases, which increases the risk of overheating.

Man cools off during a heat wave in Moscow, Russia.

Getty Images
Humans have a limited tolerance for heat.

Our blood begins to thicken and become more concentrated, which means that our cardiovascular system has to work harder to keep our blood pressure high.

Our kidneys try to compensate for dehydration by retaining more water by reducing urination.

Water also leaves our cells into the bloodstream, causing them to shrink.

After effects of dehydration

By losing 4% of our body weight in the form of water, blood pressure decreases and fainting can occur.

When 7% of body weight is lost, organic damage occurs.

“Your body has trouble maintaining blood pressure,” says Lobo.

“To survive, it slows the blood flow to non-vital organs, such as the kidneys and intestines, causing damage to them. Without the kidneys filtering the blood, cellular waste accumulates rapidly.

Rohingya refugee receiving medical attention.

Getty Images
Losing about 7% of body weight due to dehydration causes organic damage.

However, some people can survive dehydration this severe and may even continue to perform at high levels.

Drinking urine

Powell activated an SOS phone he carried that was linked to a service operated by a US-based company.

But when they answered him, they didn’t find anyone nearby who could help him.

Desperate, Powell dug a hole in the dry earth to keep cool and began to drink his own urine, which he combined with a sachet of rehydration salts.

In a healthy adult, urine is 95% water and the rest are waste products, excreted by the kidneys, including salts and ammonia.

When someone is dehydrated, the water content drops dramatically, which makes drinking urine more like drinking seawater.

“Although it may be safe to drink urine in the short term to rehydrate, the physiological response to dehydration is to conserve salt and water,” says Lobo.

“Urine production decreases and, ultimately, humans can develop acute kidney injury and anuria (the kidneys do not produce urine). Therefore, the quantity of urine in the medium term will not be enough to maintain adequate hydration ”.

Man holding a urine sample.

Getty Images
“Although it may be safe to drink urine in the short term to rehydrate, the physiological response to dehydration is to conserve salt and water”

Adding rehydration salts without a good amount of water could help Powell replace the salts and sugar, but it also ran the risk of causing more imbalances in his body.

In extreme cases, an imbalance in salt levels can lead to seizures and even brain hemorrhage.

Going down the cliff

Eventually, an SOS team told Powell that they could get him a helicopter, but that it would take four hours.

I’d rather die falling off a cliff than sit here, he thought.

He scanned the cliff and saw some exposed tree roots to hold onto, so he decided to go down. But he fell several meters and cut his nose.

His decision to go down may have been due in part to dehydration itself.

As dehydration worsens, it can affect how our brains work, altering our mood and our ability to think clearly.

Blood flow to our brain, and the volume of the brain itself, is reduced.

Mild to moderate levels of dehydration (a loss of 2% or more of body water) can affect our short-term memory, our surveillance, arithmetic capacity and coordination skills, particularly when doing strenuous activities in hot environments.

Feet on dry ground.

Getty Images
A loss of 2% or more of body water can affect our short-term memory, alertness, numeracy, and coordination skills, particularly when performing strenuous activities in hot environments.

Some studies, mainly in elderly patients, have also found that dehydration can play a role in delirium.

However, Powell kept going down and pushed himself off the cliff for nearly an hour until he managed to get back to the river.

He had to sit there for an hour, cooling off and drinking water, until he was able to access his satellite phone to tell his rescuers that he was fine.

“Dehydration is reversible, and by replacing body water you are likely to make a full recovery,” says Natalie Cookson, an ER doctor trainee working in London.

If he hadn’t managed to rehydrate, Powell’s kidneys would have started to fail.

Toxins can begin to build up, causing the kidneys to stop working properly.

This can lead to a form of kidney damage known as acute tubular necrosis, which even if rehydration occurs, can take weeks to reverse.

Woman drinking water.

Getty Images
“Dehydration is reversible, and by replacing body water, one is likely to make a full recovery.”

The added stress on his heart would also have led to an irregular heartbeat, a drop in blood pressure, and possibly seizures.

Dehydration can also cause vital parts of the cardiovascular system, such as blood vessels, to harden, increasing the risk of a heart attack.

Being dehydrated in hot weather only compounds the problem.

“The body is unable to regulate heat, which causes the destruction of key enzymes in normal metabolic pathways, which causes organs such as the brain, heart and lungs to stop working,” says Cookson.

Eventually, this can lead to seizures, coma, and, when organs begin to fail, death.

Time without water

How long exactly someone can survive without water is still largely debated. Most scientists agree that humans can only go a few days without food or water.

In 1944, two scientists were deprived of water, one for three days and one for four days, but they ate a dry diet.

By the last day of their experiment, both had difficulty swallowing and their faces had turned “somewhat pale.”

But they stopped the experiment long before his condition deteriorated to the point of becoming dangerous.

Man drinking water from a fountain in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Getty Images
Most scientists agree that humans can only go a few days without food or water.

The capacity of stay without water can also vary greatly from person to person.

There is some evidence, for example, that the human body can adapt to the level of water that is consumed regularly.

The longest known time that someone has been without water was in the case of Andreas Mihavecz, an 18-year-old Austrian bricklayer who was locked up in a police cell for 18 days in 1979 after duty officers forgot of the.

His case even made it to the Guinness Book of Records.

While few of us likely experience this type of extreme dehydration, around 4 billion people experience severe water shortages at least one month out of the year.

Climate change is also likely to hamper access to safe water supplies in many parts of the world.

By some estimates, up to two-thirds of the world’s population will face water shortages by 2025.

Although Powell’s experience was a lesson in patience, it also taught him how important water is.

“I certainly don’t take it for granted anymore,” he says.


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Headline USA

Townsville only to drink water and flush toilet as washing clothes is banned after a pipe burst

The town where you can’t shower: Residents are only allowed to have a drink and flush their toilet after water supplies fell to critically low levels – with washing clothes and dishes banned

  • Townsville residents were told to stop all water use other than drinking and toilet
  • A 1.3 diameter pipe ruptured at the Douglas Water Treatment Plant on Friday
  • Since then residents have been told to immediately limit their water supply  

Residents in Townsville have been told to stop all water use other than drinking and flushing toilets as water supply hits a critically low level.

Townsville City Council told all residents to restrict water use in the northeastern Queensland in the coastal city on Saturday morning.

Residents were first told to start conserving water after a 1.3 diameter pipe ruptured at the Douglas Water Treatment Plant on Friday at 2pm.

Residents were first told to start conserving water after a 1.3 diameter pipe ruptured at the Douglas Water Treatment Plant (pictured) on Friday at 2pm

The leaking pipe is the main tube that feeds into the treatment plant, giving Townsville its fresh and clean water.

By 8pm Friday residents were told they could only use water to flush the toilet or as drinking water, the Townsville Bulletin reports. 

Staff from council have been onsite assessing the extent of the damage ever since it started leaking on Friday. 

Investigators immediately isolated the pipe to inspect it and began repairs.

From Saturday morning, residents were told to turn off their irrigation and not to do any handheld watering.

They are not allowed to shower, wash any clothes or dishes, fill up pools or wash vehicles and boats.

Council staff have been joined by contractors BMD, NQ Excavations and CivilPls who have been working overnight to replace the ruptured pipe.

Residents in Townsville have been told to stop all water use other than drinking (stock image) and flushing toilets as water supply hits a critically low level

Residents in Townsville have been told to stop all water use other than drinking (stock image) and flushing toilets as water supply hits a critically low level

The broken section has been removed and workers are now installing a new pipe. 

The city is using emergency water to maintain the basic supply in the hopes of restoring the city’s full water capacity.

A full recharge of the water system is expected to take at least 24 hours until regular pumping can begin.

Some areas of Townsville may experience issues with water supply as the city’s water reserves are critically low. 

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Headline USA

Christening photo goes viral due to the appearance of a “divine sign” | The State

For those who are believers in the existence of God, hehe photograph of a baptism has generated great sensation among the Catholic community, since something extraordinary happened that many have described as a “divine sign” of the Creator’s presence.

It turns out that A photographer named María Silva Salles was hired by a family from Córdoba, Spain, to capture with her lens one of the most important moments in the life of her son Valentino: his baptism.

Little Valentino Mora received this sacrament in the Parish Church of the Asunción de Nuestra Señora de Córdoba. Silva was attentive to the entire ceremony and was shooting his lens at all times so as not to miss any detail.

Just as he was reviewing the images, he was shocked to see something extremely extraordinary while the little one received the baptismal water: the holy liquid that fell from the baby’s head had formed a rosary.

Some consider that it could be an editing trick; However, the photographer clarified that she carried out the session with a film camera, so the photo did not have any digital process.

But for those who profess the Catholic faith, this fact has a special meaning when considering that this baby surely has a very important mission in life to fulfill.

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Headline USA

Venice floods: St Mark’s Square swamped with water after heavy rain

Venice has been flooded with water once again as officials warn of a ‘terrible situation’ a year after the city suffered a billion pounds of damage during high tides. 

Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning, catching the authorities off guard before they could activate the huge flood barriers that were rolled out just two months ago.

Those tides then reached a 145 cm peak as strong sirocco winds blew in from Croatia and two rivers flooded near the sea around the historic Italian city.

The system of 78 flood gates, known as Mose, guard the entrance to the Venetian lagoon and are designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft). However, they require 48-hours notice to be activated.

Weather bulletins in past days had forecast rainfall pushing sea levels up to 120 centimetres, below the 130 cm threshold at which the flood barriers are operated.

A woman in a red dress on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, following following heavy rains and strong winds 

People walk across a flooded street on Tuesday in Venice. Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

People walk across a flooded street on Tuesday in Venice. Bad weather including heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise and flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8. Waters are expected to rise to a maximum of 145cm later today, according to local authorities

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8. Waters are expected to rise to a maximum of 145cm later today, according to local authorities

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8

People walk across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, following heavy rains and strong winds

People walk across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, following heavy rains and strong winds

A couple walks holding hands  in flooded St. Mark's Square

A couple walks holding hands  in flooded St. Mark’s Square

Video footage taken in the city shows the iconic St Mark’s Square, or Piazza San Marco, swamped with flood water. 

Carlo Alberto Tessein, procurator of the Basilica of San Marco, described the situation as ‘terrible’ and said the water had got inside the historic building, risking damage.  

The city’s mayor, Luigi Brugnaro, wrote on Twitter: ‘3.10pm… Now I’m at the Centro Maree to follow the development of the situation. Next maximum 145 cm at 16:40, due to the anomalous wind reinforcement. The MOSE system is not active.’  

Brugnaro said that the weather had suddenly worsened and water had reached a 145 cm peak as strong sirocco winds blew in from Croatia and two rivers flooded near the sea around Venice.  

He called for more rapid and reactive protocols in the operation of Mose in order to face sudden weather changes.

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

A person takes photos while standing on a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

People take photos in the middle of a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8

People take photos in the middle of a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8

People walk in flooded St. Mark's Square during high tide

People walk in flooded St. Mark’s Square during high tide

People were seen riding a traditional boat in a flooded street in Venice, Italy

People were seen riding a traditional boat in a flooded street in Venice, Italy

Workers are seen in the flooded St. Mark's Square during high tide

Workers are seen in the flooded St. Mark’s Square during high tide

A person poses for a photo in flooded St. Mark's Square

A person poses for a photo in flooded St. Mark’s Square

‘The situation is terrible, we are under water,’ said Carlo Alberto Tesserin, responsible for managing Saint Mark’s Basilica, adding that if the water rose further all the internal chapels would be flooded.

The centre for tidal forecasts in the Venice area said the water would recede to 120 cm on Wednesday and be back up to 135 cm on Thursday.

High tides, or ‘acqua alta’ in Italian, have been regular occurrences in Venice over the years, caused by a combination of factors exacerbated by climate change – from rising sea levels and unusually high tides to land subsidence that has caused the ground level of the city to sink.

Of the 24 tides ever recorded above the 140-cm level, 15 have occurred in the last two decades, including five last November when the city’s St Mark’s Square was submerged under a metre of water.

Designed in 1984, construction of the multi-billion euro Mose project started in 2003 but was plagued by delays, corruption and cost overruns. The 78 yellow barriers were tested in July and then first raised in October. 

People walk across an shopping arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

People walk across an shopping arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

A woman clears her flooded shop on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A woman clears her flooded shop on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

Heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise. Pictured two people in umbrellas walking in St. Mark's Square

Heavy rain and high winds caused the tide in Venice to rise. Pictured two people in umbrellas walking in St. Mark’s Square

It comes after Venice was hit by flooding three times last year – twice in November and once in December – causing a billion euros in damage. 

In November 2019, Italy declared a state of emergency after floods brought carnage to the city, flooding its historic basilica and leaving ‘widespread devastation’. 

Venice authorities said the damage last year ran to hundreds of millions of pounds, including millions in St Mark’s Basilica alone.

A man walks across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark's Square on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A man walks across an arcade by a flooded St. Mark’s Square on December 8, 2020 in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds, and the mobile gates of the MOSE Experimental Electromechanical Module that protects the city of Venice from floods, were not lifted

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on December 8

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on December 8

A shop owner protects water from getting in on December 8, in Venice following a high tide "Alta Acqua" event following heavy rains and strong winds

A shop owner protects water from getting in on December 8, in Venice following a high tide ‘Alta Acqua’ event following heavy rains and strong winds

A view shows a flooded St. Mark's Square by the Doge's Palace and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on Tuesday

A view shows a flooded St. Mark’s Square by the Doge’s Palace and a luminous Christmas Tree installation by Italian artist Fabrizio Plessi on Tuesday

People walking past the Rialto Bridge during high tide

People walking past the Rialto Bridge during high tide

People standing inside a flooded cafe as flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

People standing inside a flooded cafe as flood waters reached a height of 122cm this morning

The system of 78 flood gates designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft) requires 48-hours notice to be activated. Pictured people walking in a flooded street

The system of 78 flood gates designed to protect the city from tides of up to 3 metres (10 ft) requires 48-hours notice to be activated. Pictured people walking in a flooded street

Venice archbishop Francesco Moraglia said at the time that the church had suffered ‘irreparable damage’ and the crypt was flooded for just the second time in its history.

The high waters in 2019 brought misery to local residents – stranding boats and gondolas, battering shops and hotels and leaving many of the city’s squares and alleyways deep underwater. 

In June this year, a quarter of Venice was submerged by a near-record high tide, at a time of year when such flooding is rare.

The flooding in summer came just two days after Italy reopened its borders to tourists in an attempt to salvage its summer season following coronavirus lockdown.

Previous times Venice has flooded 

A woman crosses the flooded St Mark's Square on November 13, 2019, where Venice's 1,200-year-old basilica (pictured behind her) was flooded by the high tide

A woman crosses the flooded St Mark’s Square on November 13, 2019, where Venice’s 1,200-year-old basilica (pictured behind her) was flooded by the high tide 

Venice was hit by flooding three times last year – twice in November and once in December – causing a billion euros in damage.

On November 12, 2019, the city was devastated by an acqua alta that reached 187 centimeters, with almost 90% of the city flooding. 

The northern Italian city of canals was hit by the highest tide in more than 50 years last year, with tourists wading through flooded streets to seek shelter as a fierce wind whipped up waves in St. Mark’s Square.

The exceptionally intense ‘acqua alta,’ or high waters, peaked at 1.87 metres (six feet) on November 12, 2019, according to the tide monitoring centre.

In November 2019, Italy declared a state of emergency after floods brought carnage to the city, flooding its historic basilica and leaving ‘widespread devastation’. 

Venice authorities said the damage last year ran to hundreds of millions of pounds, including millions in St Mark’s Basilica alone.

Venice archbishop Francesco Moraglia said at the time that the church had suffered ‘irreparable damage’ and the crypt was flooded for just the second time in its history. 

The high waters in 2019 brought misery to local residents – stranding boats and gondolas, battering shops and hotels and leaving many of the city’s squares and alleyways deep underwater.