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NYPD ‘Community Policing’ Plan Reveals 3.6 Times More Detentions to Minorities | The State


After five years of the implementation of the ‘Neighborhood Watch’ of the New York City Police Department (NYPD) that created special brigades to target high-crime communities, balances and opinions found on the real effect of this strategy on crime control. And, particularly, to which ethnic group is still being arrested more frequently in the Big Apple.

On the one hand, several reports shown by civil organizations show that poor neighborhoods of color remain disproportionately the target of the uniformed, and on the other hand, the City boasted of displaying for 36 continuous months, before the 2020 pandemic, a “historical” decrease in the crime rate.

Now a new investigation titled ‘Effects of the Neighborhood Police in NYC’, disclosed by academics from the Departments of Sociology of the Universities of Colorado and Florida, accurately reflects that this strategy did indeed reduce arrests in all five boroughs, but people of color were 3.6 more times stopped than other ethnic groups.

Misdemeanor arrests decreased 28% and arrests for misdemeanors possessing drugs, weapons, or driving while intoxicated They fell by 61%, according to the study that includes the observation between January 2006 and January 2019 of 76 police headquarters in the five counties, which have in common being areas of ‘tension’ between the relationship of the officers with the communities.

“There was no real decrease in crime”

In a categorical way, the study shared by both universities does not attribute to the ‘Neighborhood Police’ plan a significant impact on the “real decrease in the crime rate”.

“This surveillance model did not have an impact on the control of certain crimes. Although it shows a lower rate of criminal actions in general in the city. We suspect that this change was due to Police used their discretion to make fewer arrests, consequently there were fewer underlying crimes ”, states the report in its conclusions.

The group of researchers stresses that although neighborhood surveillance reduced arrests and subsequent judicial prosecutions, it is obvious that this model of community intervention did not affect the “racial proportion of such arrests ”. A reasoning shared by at least six analyzes released in recent weeks.

Another finding that the academic report needs is that in some neighborhoods where white communities were approximately 1.5 times more numerous, they were arrested less than a third as often as their neighbors of color.

Everything indicates that the unemployment rates in each locality where the program was implemented had a certain impact on the way the communities were approached.

“Intervention in areas with high levels of job unemployment it had a negative effect on the balance on the disparity ”, the analysis maintains, where it is also clarified that the perception or assessment of New Yorkers about the achievements of this strategy of community outreach was not measured.

“We have no way of ensuring, if after these actions the police are perceived as closer to people”They pondered.

Since 2015, neighborhoods in the Bronx have added more crime control officers. (Photo: F. Martínez)

The new age

In 2015, the NYPD launched this community policy of ‘neighborhood watch’ designed to reduce crime, and furthermore, lower racial tensions in some locations in the Big Apple, in the heat of the historical controversy over alleged ‘racist conduct’ by police officers.

Mayor Bill de Blasio deemed it a “truly transformative” plan that was being implemented “on the largest scale to ensure that the people of this city have a police force that is deeply connected to the neighborhood ”.

Meanwhile, when he was Police Commissioner, Bill Bratton characterized the adoption of this strategy as the NYPD’s passage “into a new era.” For this, the police stations were restructured and more than 1,200 new officers were trained to become a link with the neighbors, rather than repressors of crime.

After five years of its application, this strategy meets the pandemic and the movements against police brutality. Academic voices and denunciations of coalitions that push for judicial reforms, continue to put a ‘Explosive trigger’ of rejection of the action of the Uniformada in the poorest neighborhoods.

Community activist from The Bronx, Miguel Zacarías, 55 years old, He comments that “if you see the full movie, the only thing that happened is that they sent more police to the poorest sectors. Each of these police stations are different. There are some where there are policies of approach and listen to the people, but there are others that do not. It is an uneven plan ”.

In the words of Zacarías, the ‘Stop and Frisk’ methodology that for years has “criminalized blacks and Latinos “ Rather, it was a different approach that “softened” it, but deep down it is the same.

The authorities of the city of New York have shown in their balance sheets a decrease from 1.8% to 5% in monthly crime reports such as theft, robbery, rape, assault and crimes in general on the Subway.

To cite one example, the former NYPD commissioner James O’Neil before leaving his position last year, reported as a relevant achievement that until October 2018 the general crime rate reported 80,313 cases, in that same period in 2019, the number was 78,887.

Some sectors highlight “greater proximity” of the uniformed in their communities. (Photo: F. Martínez)

More reports, more disparity

Other recent reports have fueled the fire of this controversy.

A report from John Jay College last September found that police disparities are most questionable when broken down by age: African-American or Latino people ages 18-20 they are almost eight times more likely to be arrested than white people.

It is also evidenced by official figures that agents continue to arrest black New Yorkers almost twice as much as whites, although they similarly conclude that there was a considerable “drop” in arrests according to a cross-over of official information between 2003 and 2018.

Given the acid rain of reports, one of the promoters of the community policing agenda, former police commissioner Bill Bratton reacted to local media by stating that police statistics are associated with the places where more calls to 911 are received.

“It is obvious that simply the police go where the neighbors report the most criminal acts. That is the account that must be drawn ”, he pointed out.

In Bronx neighborhoods that are generally at the table in this discussion, because there are percent poorer neighborhoods and violent, more than a dozen organizations that fight for the end of mass incarcerations and promote changes in the criminal justice system, continue to weigh with their figures at hand, that the “NYPD’s systemic racism is far to be part of the history of the city ”.

In contrast, other coalitions such as ‘Life Camp‘, which links with communities to prevent armed violence, show that between 2016 and 2018, it has been achieved a 15% decrease in shootings, at the 17 most violent police stations in New York City.

Remo Cruz, resident of the Bronx: “If you live in peace you should not have problems with the police.” (Photo: F. Martínez)

Voices from the Bronx

Opinion in the streets is also very divided. Bronx residents like the Mexican Mireya Zaas, 58, He says that with 20 years living in the Kinsgbridge area, he has seen how the police officers have been more active on the streets of his neighborhood. And consider that now “it is safer.”

“A lot of drugs, a lot of people who do nothing, if not be on street corners since morning, without a job. I do not agree with that attack on the police. Rather we need a thousand more. He who does not owe it does not fear it ”, exclaimed the woman from Puebla.

Also, the Puerto Rican Remo Cruz raised in Salsa County describes that in the tremont avenue he has not observed any difference over the years.

“If you are not in trouble and you live in peace, you should not have complicated contacts with the police. This sector used to be hotter, but now he is calmer, “said the islander.

The boricua Miguel Vásquez with “all his life in the Bronx” has a different vision, as he points out that the presence of the NYPD is usually “Very negative” in general terms.

“The officers are on their own. I don’t think they here in Kingsbridge had any interest in having harmonious contact with the neighbors. Much less listen. They do their job and we continue our life if we are not in trouble, “concludes Vásquez.

Miguel Vásquez: The NYPD’s contact with the communities is very negative. (Photo: F: Martínez)

‘Hard’ figures on disparity:

  • 93% of the total Of 473 minors between the ages of 16 and 17 detained between June and October 2019 in the Big Apple were of color and Latino, according to an analysis released in August by the Youth Justice Reseach Collaborative (YJRC).
  • 5.8 times more shares such as arrests, fines or searches against Afro-descendants compared to whites between 2003 and 2018. This is stated by John Jay College.
  • 9 times greater were the police actions against minority youth between 16 and 17 years, in contrast to whites in the same period of time graphs the same report.
  • 150,000 were arrested For evading the Subway payment system in 2015, the year the Neighborhood Watch Plan began, 92% of those captured were Hispanics and African Americans, says the Judicial Reform Project.

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Dawn French says we shouldn’t be ‘policing fiction’ after writing black characters in new book


Dawn French has defended her decision to write from the perspective of a black character in her latest novel, adding that society shouldn’t be ‘policing fiction’.

The comedian and author, 63, released her fourth novel Because of You this week, which features a host of multicultural characters.

Appearing on The Andrew Marr show this morning, the Cornish-raised French and Saunders star, who was married to Sir Lenny Henry 1984 to 2010,  said that after living in a ‘multicultural family’, for her ‘the norm is to write any colour she likes’.   

Dawn, who shares adopted daughter Billie, 29, with the comic, admitted that while a black person may have a ‘more authentic voice’ while writing about their lived experiences, she can ‘imagine any person she likes’. 

Dawn French, pictured in 2005 with former husband Lenny Henry and their adopted daughter Billie, said that after living in a ‘multicultural family’, for her ‘the norm is to write any colour she likes’

Dawn released her latest book, Because of You, which features a host of multicultural characters, earlier this week, and appeared on The Andrew Marr Show this morning to promote the novel

Dawn released her latest book, Because of You, which features a host of multicultural characters, earlier this week, and appeared on The Andrew Marr Show this morning to promote the novel

Speaking in a clip filmed before London’s Tier 2 Covid-19 restrictions were implemented, Dawn said: ‘I think it would be a very sorry old state of affairs if we couldn’t imagine anyone we liked when we’re writing’. 

‘If we start to police who you can write in fiction, I think that’s a hiding to nowhere really. 

‘For me, my lived experience is in a multicultural family, so the norm for me is to write any colour I like. 

She later added: ‘Obviously if you are a black person you can write with a more authentic black voice, you most certainly can, but I can imagine any person I like’.

Speaking in a clip filmed before London's Tier 2 Covid-19 restrictions were implemented, Dawn admitted a black person may have a 'more authentic voice' while writing about their lived experiences

Speaking in a clip filmed before London’s Tier 2 Covid-19 restrictions were implemented, Dawn admitted a black person may have a ‘more authentic voice’ while writing about their lived experiences 

She admitted that she 'fears cancel culture', and believes that especially in comedy, it's essential to be 'edgy' to 'work out what¿s funny'

She admitted that she ‘fears cancel culture’, and believes that especially in comedy, it’s essential to be ‘edgy’ to ‘work out what’s funny’

Dawn also told of the ‘insidious racism’ she witnessed throughout her marriage to Lenny, 62, and that she feels people are ‘waking up’ to more subtle forms of discrimination around us ‘all the time’. 

‘I’ve certainly lived through some interesting racism, and vicariously through him’, she said. 

‘I witnessed it coming at him all the time mostly in quite insidious ways you can’t quite grasp and then you think “Oh, that was an odd uncomfortable moment”.

‘Quite often I reflected back and thought “I was witness to something there”. And that’s something we’re waking up to now, this racism is around us all the time. 

The Vicar of Dibley star also revealed that she ‘fears cancel culture’, and believes that especially in comedy, it’s essential to be ‘edgy’ to ‘work out what’s funny’. 

Dawn told of the 'insidious racism' she witnessed throughout her marriage to Lenny, 62, and that she feels people are 'waking up' to more subtle forms of discrimination around us

Dawn told of the ‘insidious racism’ she witnessed throughout her marriage to Lenny, 62, and that she feels people are ‘waking up’ to more subtle forms of discrimination around us

‘I fear a little bit for our cancel culture’, she said, ‘I worry especially in comedy where you need to flex your muscles a little bit, where you need to live on the edges of propriety, you need to offend a tiny bit to work out what’s funny. 

‘All the way back to Lenny Bruce, and Richard Prior and people I’ve always really enjoyed, the edgy people are the people that plough the furrow for the rest of us’. 

The comedian feels the ultimate test will be whether a comedian continues to have viewers, and that entertainers should be ‘free to say anything’, as those watching are ‘free to challenge you’. 

‘I think it’s a shame, I think my opinion is say what you want to say, be free to say anything and, so everyone can be free to have a go at you, to challenge you or to tune out from you. 

‘For any comedian that’s the biggest punishment, if nobody wants to listen to you anymore then I think you’ve got the message.’ 



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Headlines UK Liverpool London Manchester Newcastle

Coronavirus UK: Boris Johnson backed down from imposing Tier 3 on Manchester amid policing fears


Boris Johnson backed down from plunging Manchester into Tier Three coronavirus restrictions amid fears police would not enforce the rules without Mayor Andy Burnham’s backing. 

Greater Manchester Police currently answers to the city’s Labour Mayor, while police and crime commissioners – a role filled in Manchester by Mr Burnham – have the power to set strategic priorities for their local constabularies.

This means that police enforcement of restrictions is contingent on the support of Mr Burnham, who is refusing to move the region into Tier Three without a full reinstatement of the furlough scheme.  

Meanwhile, official figures show that the infection rate is dropping in Greater Manchester and Newcastle despite anti-Covid measures, in a development that risks undermining the Government’s public health messaging.

Nearly 600 coronavirus cases were recorded in Manchester on September 30, which then fell to 377 recorded cases on October 9. On Thursday, there were just two cases in Manchester. In Newcastle, 277 cases were recorded on October 6, which similarly fell down to 170 infections on October 9 and just 10 cases on Thursday.  

Mr Burnham accused Mr Johnson of treating the North like a ‘sacrificial lamb’ and a ‘canary in the coalmine’ with experimental restrictions, claiming if London was in the same position there would be a national shutdown.  

It is thought that negotiations between the Government and Manchester’s leaders will continue over the weekend with no decision likely to be made before Monday.    

The Prime Minister yesterday sent a stark message as he demanded that leaders in Greater Manchester focussed on ‘saving lives’ and said that he would step in if the two sides could not agree. 

Mr Burnham said the ‘very least’ he would accept was a full reinstatement of the furlough scheme in the region paying 80 per cent of the wages of people unable to work, though this is being ruled out by the Treasury.  

It comes after the Prime Minister hailed an agreement with Lancashire to move the region into the toughest lockdown level, where it joins Liverpool as one of only two areas in the top bracket. 

In other coronavirus developments:   

  • A senior Government adviser warned that only a national circuit-breaker lockdown would suppress virus;
  • Sir John Bell was echoed by Jeremy Hunt, who also called for public war of words on local restrictions to end; 
  • Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson said his brother has died after being admitted to intensive care with Covid;
  • Police fought to enforce coronavirus laws in London  as they faced defiance from protesters and drinkers; 
  • Mr Johnson said the UK is developing the capacity to manufacture millions of fast turnaround tests for coronavirus which could deliver results in just 15 minutes;
  • The National Education Union rowed in behind Sir Keir Starmer’s call for a national circuit-breaker; 
  • The Welsh Government will discuss a circuit-breaker lockdown and will announce decisions on Monday;
  • Some 15,650 coronavirus cases were recorded in the UK on Friday, alongside 136 deaths;  
  • A senior scientist predicted Britain could be carrying out a million coronavirus tests a day by Christmas;
  • The Prime Minister’s attention briefly switched from the pandemic to warn a No Deal Brexit was likely as both London and Brussels ramped up their tough talk. 

Greater Manchester Police currently answers to the city’s Labour Mayor, Andy Burnham while police and crime commissioners – a role filled in Manchester by Mr Burnham – have the power to set strategic priorities for their local constabularies. This means that police enforcement of restrictions is contingent on the support of Mr Burnham, who is refusing to move the region into Tier Three as he accuses Boris Johnson of treating the North like a ‘sacrificial lamb’

Nearly 600 coronavirus cases were recorded in Manchester on September 30, which then fell to 377 recorded cases on October 9. On Thursday, there were just two cases in Manchester

In Newcastle, 277 cases were recorded on October 6, which similarly fell down to 170 infections on October 9 and just 10 cases on Thursday

Nearly 600 coronavirus cases were recorded in Manchester (left) on September 30, which then fell to 377 recorded cases on October 9. On Thursday, there were just two cases in Manchester. In Newcastle (right), 277 cases were recorded on October 6, which similarly fell down to 170 infections on October 9 and just 10 cases on Thursday

Boris Johnson has backed down from imposing Tier 3 Covid restrictions in Manchester amid fears police would not enforce them without Andy Burnham's backing. Pictured: Revellers in Manchester on Friday

Boris Johnson has backed down from imposing Tier 3 Covid restrictions in Manchester amid fears police would not enforce them without Andy Burnham’s backing. Pictured: Revellers in Manchester on Friday

Revellers leaving bars and clubs at 10pm in Lancashire after new lockdown restrictions imposed

Revellers leaving bars and clubs at 10pm in Lancashire after new lockdown restrictions imposed

It comes after Mr Johnson hailed an agreement with Lancashire to move into the toughest lockdown level where it joins Liverpool as the only areas in the top bracket. Pictured: People leaving bars and clubs at 10pm in Lancashire after new lockdown restrictions imposed

The Prime Minister had previously said that he wanted ‘maximum local enforcement’, which could only be achieved with ‘maximum local buy-in’.

Home Secretary Priti Patel phoned Ian Hopkins, the Chief Constable of Greater Manchester, ‘to make sure they have all the support they need from national politicians but also, more importantly’ from ‘local politicians’.  

The Home Office source also told The Telegraph: ‘The police are not politicised. They have operational independence and it is the police’s job to enforce the law.’      

Social distancing safety messages against Covid-19 now greets visitors in Blackpool, Lancashire

Social distancing safety messages against Covid-19 now greets visitors in Blackpool, Lancashire

Mr Johnson said: ‘This is about saving lives. This is about us joining together locally and nationally to get the R down, to make these regional restrictions, this tiering system, work and to save lives.

‘Everybody in Greater Manchester and all the areas that are still finding it difficult should think about it.’

He added: ‘I’d much rather not impose things, I’d much rather that we were able to work out something together with local authorities, with the mayor in Manchester.’   

It comes as a senior Government adviser today warned that only a second national lockdown would achieve the suppression of coronavirus as he blasted other restrictions as ‘biting around the edges’.

Sir John Bell, regius professor of medicine at the University of Oxford, advocated a national circuit-breaker as he claimed the Government had lost control of an ‘eye-watering’ number of coronavirus cases.

He rubbished suggestions that testing would allow officials to keep the pandemic in check, and called the situation ‘grave’ as he appeared to blame a rise in cases on a national fatigue with the restrictions.  

The top Government adviser then recommended a total shutdown of society and economy in an echo of Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer’s unprecedented call for a national circuit-breaker on Tuesday.

Speaking to BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, Sir John said: ‘Things look pretty grave at the moment, and the numbers are going up pretty rapidly. I think the other phenomenon you’re seeing is people are pretty unhappy, they’re tired, this has been going on too long, they can’t go about their business, they can’t do the normal things that they would expect to do, hospital staff are exhausted from the last go.

‘I think we’re actually in real trouble, because as that happens compliance and the willingness to help fix this problem starts to dissipate. Having said that, I can see very little way of getting on top of this without some kind of a circuit-breaker because the numbers are actually pretty eye-watering in some bits of the country and I think it’s going to be very hard to get on top of this just biting around the edges.’ 

He added: ‘No one has ever turned back an epidemic or indeed a pandemic with testing. Testing alone has never solved the problem. It’s one of many tools in the toolbox that you sort of need to get it to work, but in the places that have been successful, like South Korea and to some extent China, their ability to pursue the results of testing aggressively has been extremely important in terms of managing it.

The R rate remains stable for the UK as a whole but it has dropped for the second week in a row in England, falling from a possible range of 1.3 to 1.6 on October 2 to 1.2 to 1.4 today. But SAGE warned today it is 'confident transmission is not slowing' and that cases will continue to grow exponentially for as long as R remains above one

The R rate remains stable for the UK as a whole but it has dropped for the second week in a row in England, falling from a possible range of 1.3 to 1.6 on October 2 to 1.2 to 1.4 today. But SAGE warned today it is ‘confident transmission is not slowing’ and that cases will continue to grow exponentially for as long as R remains above one

‘A majority of people who are infected are not even being identified. So we do have to have a system whereby more ownership is taken by individuals and institutions to make sure that children in schools, students in universities, and people working in businesses stay away from those businesses if they test positive.’

Sir John’s plea for a national clampdown, which would see tougher enforcement of social distancing rules, was then echoed by Jeremy Hunt, who today suggested that he would support a circuit-breaker. 

The former Health Secretary also called for an end to the public war of words over local restrictions, telling the Today programme: ‘I’ve always thought that it’s better to do things quickly and decisively than to wait until the virus has grown so I have a lot of sympathy with that.

‘But I think more important right now is we stop this public war of words between local leaders and national leaders because in a pandemic the most important thing is a consistent message because you really have to have compliance with the very, very important public health messages about social distancing.

‘And if local leaders and national leaders are saying different things, it’s incredibly damaging.

‘I really do urge Andy Burnham and other local leaders to have these arguments, and I’m sure they’re very fierce arguments and I’m sure there’s some justification for some of their concerns, but have those arguments in private not in public because that’s so damaging to the national fight against the virus.’

Test positivity data from Public Health England shows that the proportion of tests taken that have positive results has soared in September and early October, so that 7.1 per cent of all tests taken are now positive - one in every 14  swabs

Test positivity data from Public Health England shows that the proportion of tests taken that have positive results has soared in September and early October, so that 7.1 per cent of all tests taken are now positive – one in every 14  swabs



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