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Entertainment UK

Rita Ora’s 30th birthday venue Casa Cruz ‘could be stripped of licence’

Rita Ora’s 30th birthday venue Casa Cruz reportedly could lose its licence over the “inexcusable party”.

Casa Cruz has a huge celebrity clientele with the likes of Victoria Beckham and Nick Jonas often eating at the A-list restaurant.

But Met Police launched a bid to revoke the licence of Casa Cruz, in Notting Hill following the singer’s extravaganza on Saturday November 28, according to The Daily Star.

The Notting Hill celeb hotspot would be unable to serve guests alcohol or play music to them if its licence is revoked.

A Met spokesperson told The Mirror: “A total of four people have been reported for consideration for a fixed penalty notice under ‘The Health Protection ( Coronavirus ) Regulations 2020’ for contravening requirements not to participate in an indoor gathering of two or more people.


“Officers continue to liaise with the local authority regarding a potential breach of regulations at the premises.”

They added: “Police were called at 21:10hrs on Saturday, 28 November to reports of a potential breach of Covid regulations at a commercial premises in Clarendon Road, W11.

“Officers attended and carried out enquiries at the scene and following further enquiries by officers from Central West BCU.”


Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea confirmed a virtual hearing will take place later in January.

A rep for the council told the newspaper: “The location, it is under review and will be discussed at a virtual hearing on Thursday 28 Jan.”

The Mirror has requested a comment from Casa Cruz representatives.


Rita shared a grovelling apology with her fans when the news got out she threw an illegal birthday party where she mingled with friends and family.

The Lonely Together hitmaker said she was “deeply sorry” for the “inexcusable” party which she insisted was a “spur of the moment”.

In a statement on her Instagram story, Ora wrote: “Hello all, I attended a small gathering with some friends to celebrate my 30th birthday.


“It was a spur of the moment decision made with the misguided view that we were coming out of lockdown and this would be OK…

“I’m deeply sorry for breaking the rules and in turn understand that this puts people at risk.

“This was a serious and inexcusable error of judgement. Given the restrictions, I realise how irresponsible these actions were and I take full responsibility.

“I feel particularly embarrassed knowing first-hand how hard people have worked to combat this terrible illness and being fully aware of the sacrifices that people and businesses have made to help keep us all safe.

“Even though this won’t make it right, I want to sincerely apologise.”

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Headlines UK

BBC is slammed for ‘wasting’ £26.6m of licence fee money making 310 staff redundant

BBC is slammed for ‘wasting’ £26.6m of licence fee money making 310 staff redundant – with £100,000-plus packages for SCORES of people

  • Over the last eight months BBC spent £26.6m making 310 employees redundant 
  • Average of £100,661 each was given to 221 staff who took voluntary redundancy
  • 93 were handed an average of £46,773 in a non-voluntary redundancy payment 

Hundreds of BBC employees have received redundancy pay outs of up to £150,000 in what has been branded an ‘egregious waste of licence fee money’.

Over the last eight months £26.6 million has been spent by the broadcaster making 310 employees redundant, figures obtained by The Times reveal.

An average of £100,661 each was given to 221 staff who took voluntary redundancy, whilst a further 93 were handed an average of £46,773 in a non-voluntary redundancy payment, the publication reports.

Julian Knight, Tory chairman of the Commons digital, culture, media and sport committee, told The Times: ‘This is an egregious waste of  licence fee money. 

‘Redundancy payouts in excess of £100,000 on average are a slap in the face for all those over 75s that the BBC is forcing to pay their licence fees.’

Mark Mardell, former Europe and North America editor, who left the broadcaster last month

The millions spent on the severance payments in the period from April to November this year is equivalent to 168,000 TV licences. 

Carrie Gracie, former BBC China editor, who recently left the broadcaster

Carrie Gracie, former BBC China editor, who recently left the broadcaster

On November 4 the government introduced a cap on redundancy payouts for public sector workers of £95,000, this was after most of the BBC’s latest redundancies.

Figures seen by The Times revealed that several employees took home a redundancy payment of £150,000, the BBC’s own upper limit. 

Well-known figures who have recently left the broadcaster include Carrie Gracie, former China editor,  Mark Mardell, former Europe and North America editor and James Robbins, diplomatic correspondent.

Tim Davie, the BBC director-general who took over in September, said he planned to cut senior managers from the broadcaster’s 19,500 staff – however BBC News employees were temporarily protected due to the demands of the pandemic.

At the start of the year the corporation announced it would have to make a saving of £125million due a hole that the pandemic had blown in the budget. Public service staff were invited to express an interest in voluntary redundancy.    

The £125million is in addition to the efficiency savings the broadcaster has committed to – £800million by 2021/22.  

Earlier this year the BBC prompted a huge row by stripping millions of over-75s of their free TV licences, restricting the benefit to those who are on pension credit.

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary Oliver Dowden, who is currently in talks with the BBC over the cost of the TV licence from April 2022

Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary Oliver Dowden, who is currently in talks with the BBC over the cost of the TV licence from April 2022

This followed the Government’s decision to make the BBC liable for the cost of funding the benefit, which the corporation said was not possible without substantial cuts to service.

Mr Dowden has asked the BBC to set out its ‘financial needs’ to ‘inform’ his assessment of the right price for the licence fee and to make sure it offers ‘value for money’. 

For some the recent spending on severance payments has caused them to question other financial decisions made by the broadcaster. 

John O’Connell, of the Taxpayers’ Alliance pressure group, told The Times: ‘The BBC claims it can’t pay for TV licences for over-75s, yet is able to find tens of millions of pounds for golden goodbyes.’

Ministers have repeatedly spoken of their intention to reform the BBC, and a consultation is currently underway to decriminalise non-payment of the licence fee. 

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UAE

UAE nuclear operator submits application for Unit 2 operating licence at Abu Dhabi’s Barakah Nuclear Power Plant

The Barakah Nuclear Plant. Work is currently ongoing to begin Unit 2 operations.
Image Credit: WAM/Gulf News Archives

Abu Dhabi: The UAE’s nuclear regulator, the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), is now reviewing the operating licence application for Unit 2 of the country’s first nuclear power plant, a senior official announced in the capital on Monday.

The licence will be issued when the operator, Nawah Energy Company, declares its readiness, and can meet all regulatory requirements, said Christer Viktorsson, director general at the FANR.

“2020 was a challenging year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, yet the UAE Nuclear Energy Programme has witnessed major milestones this year. Unit 1 reached 100 per cent power and began delivering electricity to the national grid, and we are reviewing the operating licence application for Unit 2,” Viktorsson said during a virtual press conference to review the 2020 achievements of the nuclear sector.

“We managed to cope with the unforeseen circumstance and maintain our regulatory functions, while also implementing a range of [COVID-19 precautionary] measures. [These included] mandating employees to work remotely, a reduced number of resident inspectors at Barakah Nuclear Power Plant, and the activation of remote inspections,” he added.

Power plant

The Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC), the owner of the Barakah Nuclear Power Plant in Abu Dhabi emirate’s Al Dhafra region, last week announced that Unit 1 is now generating 1,400 megawatts of electricity from a single generator connected to the UAE grid. According to ENEC’s operating and maintenance subsidiary, Nawah, this makes the plant the largest single source of electricity in the UAE.

Work is currently ongoing to begin Unit 2 operations, as well as to complete the construction of Units 3 and 4. When all four units are operations, the plant will generate up to 25 per cent of the UAE’s electricity. “During Unit 1 review, the FANR conducted 185 inspections, and this year, the regulator has conducted 20 inspections covering Unit 2’s safety, security and safeguards. The regulator has also certified 23 reactor operators to join 58 others to manage Unit 1 and 2’s control rooms,” Viktorsson said.

Other milestones

Other than the milestones at Barakah, the country’s nuclear sector also witnessed other major leaps this year. The FANR launched a Nuclear Non-Proliferation Centre in August to train and provide support regarding nuclear safeguards, export controls and non-proliferation.

The authority also conducted 48 inspections for licensee storage facilities, and certified the first batch of 14 temporary qualified experts in radiation protection who can work in advisory roles within institutions and private companies working with ionising radiation.

Radiation monitoring

A new version of the Radiological Environmental Monitoring Programme report will soon be launched, with details on radiation levels in the UAE environment. This year, the authority carried out 240 inspections of medical and non-medical facilities, while also issuing 263 new licensed and 1,046 import/export radiation permits. In addition, a total of 540 calibration certificates were issued to to customers from medical, industrial and nuclear sectors in the UAE.

In 2021, the UAE is set to host a major international exercise that will test its emergency preparedness and response system. The exercise will be the largest and most complex one organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

The FANR, which has 245 staff, of which 67 per cent are Emiratis, also launched a Youth Council in November to support future Emirati nuclear experts.

Categories
UAE

Ras Al Khaimah Police introduce new rules for obtaining driving licence

Ras Al Khaimah: On Sunday, Ras Al Khaimah Police announced new rules for obtaining driving licences in the emirate. The Vehicles and Drivers Licensing Department has made 15 training lessons mandatory for all applicants.

The latest decision is in line with the aspirations of the Ministry of Interior and is aimed at enhancing the quality of life for everyone. This follows a close scrutiny and follow-up action by Major General Ali bin Alwan Al Nuaimi, Commander-in-Chief of Ras Al Khaimah Police, to ensure road safety in the emirate.

The department has set some standards at the level of training and qualification to pass drivers’ examinations in all categories and at all levels of examinations (heavy vehicles, light vehicles, heavy buses and motorcycles) in order to improve traffic safety.

Brigadier Dr Mohammad Saeed AlHumaidi, Director General of Central Operations at Ras Al Khaimah Police, explained that a total of 15 mandatory training sessions will now be required to obtain driving licences for all vehicle categories. Brigadier AlHumaidi also said that applicants will also be required to clear night training sessions before passing the main examination.

Categories
UAE

COVID-19: Abu Dhabi suspends physician’s licence



Dubai: The Department of Health — Abu Dhabi has temporarily suspended the license of a physician working in Abu Dhabi’s health care sector, barq reported.

The physician spoke in a video clip about details of participating in clinical trials for the COVID-19 vaccine, and his subsequent immunity results.

Revealing such information violates UAE legislation, and breaches protocol around the clinical trials and confidentially agreements.



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UAE

Abu Dhabi announces freelancer licence for UAE residents, citizens, non-residents



Abu Dhabi: A new ‘Freelancer Licence’ has been announced by the Department of Economic Development in Abu Dhabi which covers 48 types of business activities conducted in the emirate.

The licence will be available to residents, non-residents, and citizens of UAE. Applicants must prove relevant skillset to get the licence. UAE residents should also get prior approval if employed in public or private sector firms, if their chosen activity is similar to their regular job.

Applicants can also apply for residence visas, authorities added. Office space is also not mandatory.

This new licence is expected to help companies take advantage of the broad experience and expertise available in the market while being able to eliminate employment in specialisations that are required only periodically.

The licence is also expected to boost income of groups including housewives, retirees and students. It will also allow more remote working opportunities. 



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Headlines UK London

The Crown creator ‘used a lot of artistic licence’ says man who broke into the Queen’s bedroom


The Crown creator Peter Morgan ‘used a lot of artistic licence’ says Michael Fagan – who broke into the Queen’s Buckingham Palace bedroom in 1982

  • Michael Fagan, 70, climbed the railings of the palace and got in through window 
  • He said that when the Queen saw him she said: ”What are you doing here?”  
  • Mr Fagan added that Peter Morgan didn’t consult him over the  adaptation  

The man who broke into the Queen’s Buckingham Palace bedroom has said that the creator of The Crown ‘used a lot of artistic licence’ when recreating his crime. 

Michael Fagan, 70, climbed the railings of the Queen’s London residence in 1982 and got in through an open window before finding himself face to face with Her Majesty herself. 

The out-of-work painter and decorator has now claimed that the series creator Peter Morgan did not stick to the facts when adapting the incident for television, which will air this Sunday. 

He said that although some reports have suggested he had a 10-minute conversation with the Queen, very few words were said. 

Michael Fagan (pictured), 70, climbed the railings of the Queen's London residence in 1982 and got in through an open window before finding himself face to face with Her Majesty herself

Michael Fagan (pictured), 70, climbed the railings of the Queen’s London residence in 1982 and got in through an open window before finding himself face to face with Her Majesty herself

Mr Fagan told The Telegraph: ‘I pulled back the curtain and she said, ”What are you doing here?”.’

He added that her tone wasn’t as clipped as one might expect and that she speaks ‘normally’. 

Although Mr Morgan’s version of events sees the Queen come out with the cheeky quip, ‘Have you come far?’ Mr Fagan says she actually said: ‘I’ll be back in a minute.’ 

The Queen then ran out of the room before a footman, Paul Whybrew, appeared and told Mr Fagan he looked like he ‘needed a drink’ and took him to the pantry to pour him a whiskey. 

The out-of-work painter and decorator has now claimed that the series creator Peter Morgan did not stick to the facts when adapting the incident for television, which will air this Sunday. Pictured: Buckingham Palace

The out-of-work painter and decorator has now claimed that the series creator Peter Morgan did not stick to the facts when adapting the incident for television, which will air this Sunday. Pictured: Buckingham Palace

He said that Mr Morgan didn't approach him while writing the script for the recreation of his break-in which sees Mr Fagan played by Tom Brooke (pictured filming the scene) and the Queen played by Olivia Colman

He said that Mr Morgan didn’t approach him while writing the script for the recreation of his break-in which sees Mr Fagan played by Tom Brooke (pictured filming the scene) and the Queen played by Olivia Colman

Policemen then arrived to take him away.  

Mr Fagan now lives in Islington, north London, with his partner of 17 years, Rhian, and has three great-grandchildren. 

He said that Mr Morgan didn’t approach him while writing the script for the recreation of his break-in which sees Mr Fagan played by Tom Brooke and the Queen played by Olivia Colman.  

Mr Fagan now lives in Islington, north London, with his partner of 17 years, Rhian, and has three great-grandchildren

Mr Fagan now lives in Islington, north London, with his partner of 17 years, Rhian, and has three great-grandchildren

And while the Netflix drama claims that he launched into a speech about how he believed Margaret Thatcher had ruined the country, Mr Fagan said this was not the case at all. 

He also revealed that the Queen’s bedroom isn’t as grand as the one that is shown in The Crown and that she ‘never had a four-poster bed’.   

Mr Fagan still can’t explain why he broke in but it was the second time he had managed it – the first saw him scared off by a maid and later charged with stealing a bottle of wine before being acquitted. 

He was then sent to a psychiatric hospital for three months. 



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Headlines UK London

Cricket legend Shane Warne is STRIPPED of his driver’s licence in the UK after being caught speeding


Cricket legend Shane Warne is STRIPPED of his driving licence in the UK after being caught speeding six times in luxury cars

  • Shane Warne has lost his driver’s licence after a string of speeding offences 
  • The retired cricketer is living in London doing a commentating gig for Sky News
  • He was clocked travelling 75km/h in a 64 km/h zone in a rented Jaguar

Shane Warne has lost his driver’s licence in the United Kingdom after being caught speeding in a rented luxury car.

The retired cricketer managed to rack up a total of 18 penalties on his permit, despite 12 being the legal limit in the UK.

He lost his licence after being caught speeding six times, but was allowed to get back on the road after he launched an appeal in July. 

The star was allowed to continue driving while living in London and covering the English Cricket season for Sky Sports. 

Shane Warne (pictured) has lost his driver’s licence in the United Kingdom after being caught speeding in a rented luxury car

But his time behind the wheel has come to an end after his appeal was suddenly dropped by his lawyers, reported the Herald Sun.

The 51-year-old was clocked at 75km/h in a 64 km/h zone in Kensington in August 2018.  

He was driving a rented Jaguar when he was caught by a stationary speed camera.

When authorities tallied up his points they realised he had exceeded the allowed limit, having being caught speeding on numerous occasions.

He was ordered to pay a $3,400 fine and had his licence revoked after appearing at the Wimbledon Magistrates court last year.

The star (pictured) was allowed to continue driving while living in London and covering the English Cricket season for Sky Sports after lodging an appeal

The star (pictured) was allowed to continue driving while living in London and covering the English Cricket season for Sky Sports after lodging an appeal

But he began an appeals process in July.

His legal team at the time argued any loss of his licence would amount to ‘significant hardship’ for the King of Spin. 

As a result his licence was restored until the appeal would be heard at the at Kingston Crown Court on Friday night Australian time, when his lawyers withdrew the appeal.

During the sentencing last year Deputy District Judge Adrian Turner condemned the cricketer’s driving habits.   

‘The purpose of disqualification is to protect the public and to deter,’ he said.

‘Mr Warne has now committed six speeding offences, and it may be that none on their own are particularly serious. But this is a case which plainly calls for a disqualification period in excess of six months.’

His infringements occurred between April 2016 and April 2017, totaling 15 penalty points over the 12 month period. 

Daily Mail Australia has contacted Shane Warne’s representative for comment. 

The cricketer's (pictured) infringements occurred between April 2016 and April 2017, totaling 15 penalty points over the 12 month period

The cricketer’s (pictured) infringements occurred between April 2016 and April 2017, totaling 15 penalty points over the 12 month period



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Glasgow Headlines UK

BBC sends elderly ‘threatening’ licence fee letters warning of fine


The BBC has been accused of ‘terrifying’ the elderly with ‘threatening’ licence fee letters warning viewers of a £1,000 fine if they do not pay the £157.50-a-year cost.

Social media users complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients they could face prosecution.

The letter reads: ‘Our records show your property has no TV licence. I visited today, to find out why.

‘You have not replied to our letters. So my visit today was the next stage of the official investigation into why your address doesn’t have a TV licence.’ 

The letter, emblazoned with red capital letters, reads: ‘Our records show your property has no TV licence. I visited today, to find out why’, before warning viewers of a £1,000 fine

The outside of the letter, reading 'please do not ignore' in red capital letters, in a picture posted to social media by engineer Britney, 28, from Glasgow

The outside of the letter, reading ‘please do not ignore’ in red capital letters, in a picture posted to social media by engineer Britney, 28, from Glasgow

It then goes on to detail the potential fines and prosecution the recipient could face.

Among those to complain was engineer ‘Britney Beers’, 28, who shared a picture of the letter on Twitter yesterday.

Britney, from Glasgow, owns a TV but says she does not watch BBC shows.

She uploaded her letter to social media and wrote: ‘Absolutely f***ing wild how threatening the TV licence letters are.’ 

Another Twitter user also posted: ‘My parents (88 years!) have just received your threatening letter demanding they set up a direct debit to pay their licence fee.

‘They are now highly stressed as they don’t know how to do this! I do hope you are proud of the stress you are causing our parents.’

A third added: ‘My elderly mother with dementia received her licence letter this morning. Petrified and in tears, worried sick about the fee. I am so not.’

A fourth person complained: They did this to my 64-year-old father, I had a pile of threatening BBC licence letters six inches high, nothing happened but it worried my father’.

And another added: ‘Thanks for sending a really threatening letter for cancelling my direct debit, even though my licence is paid for and valid until April 2021.

Social media users, above, complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients could face prosecution

Social media users, above, complained online after receiving the letters, which are emblazoned with red capital letters and informed recipients could face prosecution

‘There’s thousands of people losing their jobs at the moment.’

Speaking today, Britney said: ‘I don’t like answering the door to people I don’t know or not expecting if I’m in on my own. The man knocked and then posted that through the door. It’s also intimidating. 

‘I was surprised at how threatening it is, I didn’t expect them to be as demanding as that and since the recent change making pensioners pay for it, it would scare them. It’s so threatening.’

If enquiry officers suspect that BBC or iPlayer programmes are being watched without a licence fee, they may pay a visit to your home.

They cannot enter the premises, but may apply for a search warrant in order to do so.

On Sunday, it was revealed that the company responsible for collecting the licence fee made an embarrassing mistake that allowed hundreds of elderly people to pay a weekly direct debit. 

Capita (offices pictured) allowed hundreds to sign up for a weekly direct debit, before having to scrap system so anyone over 75 not paying won't have their licence cancelled (file photo)

Capita (offices pictured) allowed hundreds to sign up for a weekly direct debit, before having to scrap system so anyone over 75 not paying won’t have their licence cancelled (file photo)

Capita allowed hundreds of over 75s to sign up for this service, only for them to realise you cannot have weekly direct debits because of their automatic cancellation system.

The system had to be scrapped so anyone over the age of 75 who isn’t paying will not have their licence cancelled.

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘These letters have no connection to changes made to free licences for over 75s, they have not been sent to any older customers and TV Licensing will not be making visits to them while these changes are rolled out.

‘For people not in this group, we make no apology for reminding them they must pay the licence fee.’

A spokeswoman for TV Licensing said: ‘The majority of people pay their TV licence on a regular basis, however, there will always be some who need to be reminded.

‘Where no response is received to repeated letters, it is important to let households know the consequences of evasion.

‘Letters sent become progressively stronger in tone, depending on whether people respond to enquiries or not. TV Licensing does its best not to trouble genuine non-viewers, but we have a duty to enforce the law.’ 



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Headlines UK

BBC chiefs face backlash over use of licence fee cash to fund lewd and puerile podcasts


BBC chiefs face backlash over use of licence fee cash to fund lewd and puerile podcasts which mock the PM’s covid illness, discuss sex acts and also ‘poo-related mishaps’

  • BBC chiefs were facing backlash over offensive shows aimed at young audiences
  • The podcasts on BBC Sounds app include graphic and explicit discussions
  • Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out over-75s were now paying for these podcasts
  • Those available include Wheel of Misfortune and Too Rude For Radio 

BBC chiefs were facing a backlash last night for using licence fee payers’ money to fund lewd and puerile podcasts.

There were calls for the corporation’s new chairman to tackle the issue after the offensive shows aimed at young audiences on its BBC Sounds app came to light.

They include graphic discussions of people wetting themselves, details of explicit social media messages and crass conversations about the Prime Minister’s genitals.

Other podcasts, which are peppered with foul language and sexually explicit descriptions, cover seedy liaisons on public transport, lengthy discussions on specific sexual acts and an entire episode dedicated to defecation.

Much of the content is too offensive to describe.

Wheel of Misfortune is available on BBC Sounds and carries a warning, adding ‘you should listen anyway’. It features lengthy discussions about people wetting themselves, including the use of graphic sexual language

There were calls for the corporation¿s new chairman to tackle the issue after the offensive shows aimed at young audiences on its BBC Sounds app came to light

There were calls for the corporation’s new chairman to tackle the issue after the offensive shows aimed at young audiences on its BBC Sounds app came to light

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that over-75s, who have lost their free TV licences, were now paying for the podcasts. He added: ‘I’m sure the majority of young people would find what they are talking about quite offensive.’

Fellow Conservative Giles Watling, who sits on the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport Committee, called BBC bosses ‘morally irresponsible’.

Information on the BBC’s website suggests the podcasts can cost between £1,000 and £8,000 an episode to make.

The BBC does not publish audience figures for podcasts, unlike for its radio shows, so there is no way of knowing how many listeners they are attracting. Those available on BBC Sounds include Wheel of Misfortune, in which comedians Alison Spittle and Fern Brady share ‘their funniest and most embarrassing stories’. One episode is dedicated to the topic of faeces and another to talking about ‘p**s’.

Ex-Radio 1Xtra host ¿Dotty¿, real name Ashley Charles, hosts podcast Too Rude For Radio

Ex-Radio 1Xtra host ‘Dotty’, real name Ashley Charles, hosts podcast Too Rude For Radio

Too Rude For Radio featured a six-minute discussion about how much money a guest on the show would have to be paid to hold the Prime Minister¿s genitals, and for how long

Too Rude For Radio featured a six-minute discussion about how much money a guest on the show would have to be paid to hold the Prime Minister’s genitals, and for how long

The programme carries a warning, but then adds ‘you should listen anyway’. It features lengthy discussions about people wetting themselves, including the use of graphic sexual language.

A separate episode is described on BBC Sounds as ‘Fern, Alison and Phil share their funniest poo-related mishaps’. The aptly named Too Rude For Radio – fronted by the ex-Radio 1Xtra host ‘Dotty’, real name Ashley Charles – featured a six-minute discussion about how much money a guest on the show would have to be paid to hold the Prime Minister’s genitals, and for how long. It also included demeaning references to the fact Boris Johnson had suffered from Covid-19.

Another episode discussed Theresa May in a sexual context and talked about sex on public transport.

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that over-75s, who have lost their free TV licences, were now paying for the podcasts

Tory MP Peter Bone pointed out that over-75s, who have lost their free TV licences, were now paying for the podcasts

One series called Slide Into My Podcast included sexually explicit conversations among presenters about the ‘DMs’, or direct messages, they had received through social media. Podcast series Unexpected Fluids is dedicated to embarrassing stories about sex.

Mr Bone said: ‘The vast majority of British people will think this stuff is either rubbish or obscene. I hope the new chairman of the BBC will tackle this and review this wholly inappropriate output.

‘The over-75s are now having to pay for this sort of tosh.’

Mr Watling said the BBC was ‘trying anything and everything’ to chase younger audiences, adding: ‘I think they have lost the plot.’

A BBC spokesman said: ‘Creating audio content that’s relevant to young listeners is part of our public service remit and that rightly includes podcasts which discuss relationships and explore real-life issues.’



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