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Giants linebacker David Mayo set to make season debut



Linebacker David Mayo is expected to make his 2020 season debut Sunday against the Washington Football Team after the Giants activated him off injured reserve Friday afternoon.

Mayo was placed on IR on Sept. 6 following surgery to repair a torn meniscus in his left knee, an injury he suffered during training camp. The second-year Giant rejoins an inside linebacker rotation of Blake Martinez, Devante Downs and rookies Tae Crowder and TJ Brunson.

Joining the Giants six days prior to the 2019 season after getting released by the San Francisco 49ers, Mayo appeared in all 16 games, including starts in the final 13 games of the season. He tied for second on the team with a career-best 80 tackles, 50 solo, and had his first two career sacks.



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DAVID BAILEY’S rollicking memoir tells roguish tales as vivid as his era-defining photos 


My first glimpse of Jean Shrimpton was when I poked my head round the door of my mate Brian Duffy’s photographic studio. She’d been sent by a model agency and was posing for a Kellogg’s ad.

Duffy was using a sky-blue background, and you could see the sky behind her eyes, as if you could see through her head.

I just fell in love with her eyes — the first thing I noticed — and said: ‘Who’s that girl?’ Duffy said: ‘Forget it, Bailey, she’s too posh for you.’

My first glimpse of Jean Shrimpton was when I poked my head round the door of my mate Brian Duffy’s photographic studio. She’d been sent by a model agency and was posing for a Kellogg’s ad

I think we fell in love with each other straight away, although I was an odd choice for Jean. She’d been used to people who drove MGs and were called Ponsonby or something, and suddenly she’d met this East End bloke with a Morgan who couldn’t even spell Ponsonby.

Her father was a very successful builder who also had quite a big farm, 200 acres in Buckinghamshire — but Jean was definitely posh. I’m called Bailey because of her. I got lumbered with that because she used to go out with public schoolboys, who were all called by their surname.

When I took the first pictures of Jean, she was all arms and legs, like Bambi on the ice, but I realised her arms always went in the right place, her hands were always in the right place and she always knew where the light was.

She was an exceptional model. It’s something you can’t put your finger on. I suppose it’s a kind of visual intelligence. I didn’t explain anything to her; she had instinct, she knew how to move.

David Bailey, pictured, provides an amazing insight into his wonderful career

David Bailey, pictured, provides an amazing insight into his wonderful career

Did John Lennon steal my line?  

Looking back, by 1964 the Sixties only had a couple of years to run before it became pastiche and tourism and a kind of parody. That was the year the Ad Lib club opened, in Leicester Place, London, and ran for two heady years.

I always thought the Sixties was a small group of people, maybe not more than 150 at the outside, maybe as few as 15 when it started up.

They were mostly my mates, and many were — or became — famous for what they did, including The Beatles, the Rolling Stones, ballet dancer Rudolph Nureyev, Mr Fish the shirtmaker, the model Celia Hammond and film director Roman Polanski.

No one could get in, really, except us. It was a big party all the time, and a bit rough. I got into a punch-up there once.

I remember Jean Shrimpton didn’t like dancing at the Ad Lib. She wasn’t any good at it, so she used to just sit there with her knitting. I had a joint with John Lennon there one night, and he said to me: ‘I guess I’ve made it. Here I am, on the roof of the Ad Lib, smoking a joint with David Bailey.’

He asked me: ‘How much do you work?’

And I said: ‘Eight days a week.’

I don’t know if the song came from that. I wasn’t particularly friends with John, but out of all The Beatles, he was the only one I liked.

I would also see Princess Margaret in the Ad Lib a lot, and I got on great with her. Snowdon used to get angry because she used to write me letters. She was a big fan of my photography and not of Snowdon’s — that made him angry, too.

I liked her wit. When she was introduced to Twiggy, Twiggy said: ‘My real name’s Miss Hornby but people call me Twiggy.’

And Princess Margaret said: ‘Oh, how unfortunate.’

Even now, I’d say that Jean and Kate Moss are the two best models I’ve ever worked with. You can’t take a bad picture of either of them. There are many more beautiful girls. But those two have this universal appeal.

In 1960, just a few months before I met Jean, I’d got married for the first time. I’d met Rosemary Bramble, a typist, at the Flamingo jazz club.

In the East End, when you first slept with a girl, you were expected to marry her. That expectation had never bothered me before, but when Rosemary said: ‘You’ve ruined my life — now we’ve got to get married,’ I said yes. I thought it was normal.

Well, I never took marriage that seriously — I’d seen what it was like between my mother and father, who barely spoke to each other. Maybe I got married to get away from the East End.

After our wedding, Rosemary and I rented a one-room flat at The Oval in South London, with no inside toilet, which I was sort of used to anyway.

But I didn’t get on that well with Rosemary. She was always hysterical — angry, jealous of other girls as well as of me. We weren’t together very long.

It took me three months to seduce Jean Shrimpton. I’m sure I got to the point straight away, but she was a convent girl and wasn’t happy that I was married.

Jean was barely 18, and living at her parents’ home. So when I started seeing her, we had nowhere to go. Jean’s father threatened to shoot me. He didn’t want his daughter with a married man. Because of me, he didn’t speak to her for a year: she could only go to see her mother on weekdays, when her father wasn’t there.

I don’t know where I first made love to Jean — it was on a common, anyway, I remember that.

Once, I ended up in the haystack at her parents’ house in the countryside. I’d gone to visit her and then realised it was too late to drive back to London.

Jean said I could sleep in the haystack that was by the house. Maybe she thought she could conceal me until her father went to work, but the pigs in the yard made a terrible noise and scared me. I went to get Jean, and the pigs with their piglets followed us. Then Jean’s father came charging out and shouted at me: ‘Get out! Clear off!’

From the moment I met Jean, I wanted to work only with her, but it wasn’t easy. I had to fight for her. There was a lot of ‘we can’t book her just because she’s your girlfriend’.

Out of the studio, Jean did look a little scruffy, and UK Vogue was very touchy about appearances. And about suggestions from me.

The editor was an awful woman called Ailsa Garland who thought I was an East End yob. If you had an accent like mine, you were judged immediately.

Jagger was always tight, but I loved him 

Mick Jagger was about 18 and going out with Jean Shrimpton’s younger sister, Chrissie, when I met him.

Poor Mr Shrimpton — his two daughters were going out with ‘David Bailey makes love daily’ on one side and ‘Would you want your daughter to marry a Rolling Stone’ on the other. The Stones hadn’t been invented by then, although they soon were.

All four of us used to go to The Casserole on the King’s Road in Chelsea. I took Mick there after he’d said: ‘Dave, take me to a posh restaurant — I’ve never been to a posh restaurant.’

After the meal, I said: ‘Mick, you have to leave a tip.’

‘What f***ing for?’ he asked.

‘Well, you leave a tip in a posh restaurant,’ I said. ‘Give them ten bob.’

He put ten bob on the plate, but as he put on his jacket I noticed he’d whipped the money off the table and put it back in his pocket! Typical Mick; always mean with money. Still is.

Fashion was very staid then. Models wore gloves and pearls; they were supposed to look ‘ladylike’. And most fashion editors had terribly old-fashioned ideas and knew nothing about photography. They only cared about the dress.

One Vogue fashion editor told me ‘I want to see the shoes’, which didn’t often feature in my tightly cropped pictures.

I said: ‘Oh, you should have told me before. I haven’t got a shoes camera with me.’ She believed it because she didn’t know anything technical about photography.

Then came the trip to New York — in February 1962 — that changed everything. Getting a gig outside London was the only way Jean and I could be together.

Vogue was shooting a 14-page ‘Young Ideas’ story and Ailsa Garland, tired of me going on at her, finally said I could use Jean.

So we went to New York with Lady Rendlesham, the tough bitch in charge of the Young Ideas section. She didn’t like Jean, wasn’t sure she wanted to use her and I’m not sure she liked me very much.

At the St Regis hotel, we were put in the maids’ quarters at the top, which were fairly basic, and Lady Rendlesham had a suite. There was a telex for me from the managing director of Vogue, saying: ‘Please don’t wear your leather jacket and jeans in the St Regis hotel because you represent British Condé Nast.’

A year later, they were begging me to wear a leather jacket.

For the fashion shoot, Lady Rendlesham said: ‘We want something young.’ I didn’t know what she meant so I thought: ‘Well, I’ll put a teddy bear in every picture. Under Jean’s arm, something like that.’

I just did street pictures really. I photographed Jean on the pavement, in the traffic, at intersections next to flashing pedestrian signals, with passers-by. When we took pictures on Brooklyn Bridge, it was so cold my hand stuck to the camera and Jean fainted.

I’m the guy who made the Queen chuckle 

Someone once said I was ‘the embodiment of ‘twinkly-eyed geezerdom made good’ .

I was rewarded for that twinkly insolence when I was made a Commander of the British Empire in 2001.

The British empire, of which I have many schoolboy romantic notions, needs a good politically incorrect commander, so I accepted.

I do like the Queen. I photographed her in 2014, and she’s smiling broadly in the picture, almost laughing

I do like the Queen. I photographed her in 2014, and she’s smiling broadly in the picture, almost laughing

But as Prince Charles gave it to me, I said: ‘I’m not joining you lot — I’m infiltrating.’

I do like the Queen. I photographed her in 2014, and she’s smiling broadly in the picture, almost laughing.

I said to her: ‘If I say anything out of order, I want you to know I’ve got Truth Tourette’s.’

That’s what made her laugh. She said something about me being cheeky.

She was wearing emeralds and I asked her if they were real — as a joke. I think she wasn’t sure if I was joking or not. I liked working with her — she was all right.

The first time we met, I was at one of those f***ing things when they ask you to the Palace — I never know what for — and you stand around and sometimes they put a little red badge on you, which means she’s going to talk to you.

She asked me: ‘You were in the forces, weren’t you?’

I said: ‘Well, I was in National Service, so I suppose you could say that.’

I told her that I’d tried to get out of it, and she was quite shocked by that.   

I had terrible fights with Lady Rendlesham, made her cry three times, but in the end, eight of those pages were of Jean. People raved about the pictures, and we were launched. Jean became a top model overnight, and after that we worked together every day.

She had fantastic legs, so I used to pull her skirt up for photographs. Vogue used to airbrush it down again because they had one letter from a reader in Scotland saying Jean was disgusting for showing her legs. Just one of my many skirmishes — or skirtishes — with Vogue.

A key picture of Jean at that time was of her dressed very casually, almost shabbily, in a raincoat. Suddenly a model seemed like someone you could touch, or even take to bed.

But Jean wasn’t the kind of woman my mother, Glad, was used to. I remember she came to stay with her once in the East End.

Glad got very uptight because Jean asked where the other bedsheet was. You only had a sheet on the bottom back then. Glad said: ‘Who does she think she is?’ I’d take Jean to Chan’s Chinese restaurant in East Ham High Street, a place where a lot of villains used to go. Each time, I would tell her: ‘Don’t f***ing talk,’ because she was too posh. ‘If you speak like that, you’ll get us into a punch-up.’

We ended up renting a grotty basement flat in Primrose Hill, which was a slum then. That’s where we were tracked down by private investigators working for my wife, Rosemary, to prove we were adulterers.

The bloke sat outside in a car. I felt sorry for him. I remember I’d go and give him a coffee, the poor sod — he’d been out there all night. So it was all over the Daily Mail: top model cited in divorce.

By then I wasn’t only photographing Jean. There was another model I used in London in 1962 called Jane Holzer, a blonde American socialite who later did quite a few films for Andy Warhol.

She was great, Jane. It wasn’t love, and she was married. Just a fun romantic affair.

Jean left me in 1964. She told me it was over and flew to New York.

It was especially painful because I’d see her every day — her picture was everywhere in a famous Van Heusen ad, wearing a loose shirt, with the slogan: ‘It looks even better on a man.’

I didn’t just lose my lover, I also lost my muse. But I’d been getting fed up, too: Jean was becoming ambitious and I was jealous.

She’d become more important than me in a way. Advertisers didn’t worry about the photographer; they worried about getting Jean Shrimpton.

Six months after Jean left me, we began, out of necessity, to work together again.

I was still in love with her. Or maybe in love with the image of her.

By that time, she’d taken up with the actor Terence Stamp, whose career was taking off with the film Billy Budd.

I’d got to know him when he was living with Michael Caine in a house behind Buckingham Palace. And I’d been so nice to him: I used to give him a lift and Jean would sit on his lap in the Morgan.

That’s the only time it’s happened to me, allowing a woman to break my f***ing heart. It wasn’t going to happen again. It made me much tougher.

When I divorced Deneuve she said we could be lovers 

It was at the Ad Lib club in Soho, one of the Sixties’ coolest venues, where I first saw Catherine Deneuve.

The director Roman Polanski had just finished making his first English-speaking picture, Repulsion, with her. He said: ‘That woman’s made for you.’

‘No, she’s not,’ I said. ‘She’s too short, and a bit on the fat side for me as well.’

Polanski wanted me to photograph her for Playboy, to promote Repulsion. Catherine didn’t like the idea, and neither did I. But Roman is very persistent. In the end he persuaded her. I did them as a favour to Polanski, really.

It was at the Ad Lib club in Soho, one of the Sixties’ coolest venues, where I first saw Catherine Deneuve

It was at the Ad Lib club in Soho, one of the Sixties’ coolest venues, where I first saw Catherine Deneuve

I went to Paris and saw Catherine again. It was a long photographic session in her flat. Of all the French people I’ve ever known, she was one of the few who had a sense of humour.

Catherine and I had an instant attraction. At some point during this session — at the end of it, I think — the earth moved.

It was my friend and fellow photographer Brian Duffy who started the idea of us getting married.

I’ve never been a fan of marriage — it’s stupid, I think.

If you don’t like someone, leave ’em. Seems pointless. I learned that from growing up in the East End: all those people stuck with each other and hating each other. All right for the rich, but if you’re poor you couldn’t get divorced.

But Duffy and I had a bet. ‘I bet she wouldn’t marry you,’ he said. I said: ‘I bet she will.’ ‘I bet you ten bob she wouldn’t,’ he said.

‘All right, I’ll ask her.’

So we drove, me and Duffy, to Normandy to the set where Catherine was filming.

She came running across this cornfield when she saw us, and I said: ‘Will you marry me?’ And she said yes.

We were married within a couple of weeks in August 1965. It was all quick, it was all fun.

We got married in the register office at King’s Cross. I always got married there. Got married there three times; should have got a discount.

I remember some journalist said to me: ‘Do you get upset when you see someone caressing your wife’s t*ts?’

I replied: ‘Not really, because they’re doubles.’

She never showed her t*ts; I think it was that middle-class thing.

I used to argue with Catherine about it. ‘One day,’ I said, ‘actresses will do this and it will be normal.’ ‘No, it will never happen,’ she said.

She was a bit square, a bit French in that way. They’re supposed to be the great lovers, but they’re not. I think the men worried more about how women tied their scarves.

In June 1967, in the South of France, Catherine’s sister Françoise was killed when her car collided with a pylon and caught fire. The rescuers came too late to save her.

Catherine changed a lot after that. We were together for three years, but after Françoise died, I rarely saw her. We were friends, but lived in different countries.

We got a divorce in 1972. She rang me up and told me it was done. She said: ‘Now we can be lovers.’

I remember one thing Catherine said that was uncanny: she once saw a picture of Penelope Tree in American Vogue, before I’d ever met Penelope, and said to me: ‘You’re going to go off with this girl.’

 

  • Adapted by Corinna Honan from Look Again: The Autobiography, by David Bailey, published by Macmillan on October 29 at £20 © David Bailey 2020. To order a copy for £14 (offer valid till October 31. 2020), visit mailshop.co.uk/books or call 020 3308 9193. Free UK delivery on orders over £15.



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David Tennant lifts lid on ‘unlikely’ marriage to fellow Dr Who star’s daughter


David Tennant has described his relationship with wife Georgia as “unlikely”, and that marrying her felt “a bit stupid” because he and her dad both starred in Doctor Who.

Georgia, 35, admitted she and David, 49, only got together because she worked so hard on wooing him that she was almost like “a stalker”.

The pair, who wed in 2011 and have five kids, also spoke about how their youngest child Birdie almost died weeks after birth but was saved by the NHS.

David, who portrayed the Doctor between 2005 and 2010, met actress Georgia – whose dad Peter Davison played the part in the 1980s – while filming an episode of the BBC show in 2008.

She was playing the role of the Time Lord’s cloned daughter.

David and Georgia met in 2008

On her romance with David, Georgia said during a joint interview: “I very much forced it into happening, didn’t I?

“I was very much the driving force. Had I not worked quite so hard, it might not have happened.

“I just mean you couldn’t believe that was why I was messaging you 400 times a day. You thought maybe I was lonely and wanted a chat.

“I very much fell into stalker category. Thank goodness I did, though.

“I thought, ‘This is going to be good, I’ll persevere until he gives in’.”

David said: “That makes it sound like I was resistant, which was not what happened. I thought we were an unlikely life partnership, I suppose. There is a bit of an age gap.

Georgia, 35, admitted she and David, 49, only got together because she worked so hard on wooing him that she was almost like “a stalker”

“Because Doctor Who had run through my life like a stick of rock, to end up marrying the daughter of one of the Doctors, it all felt a bit stupid… that wasn’t really likely to happen. So there were a lot of things against it.”

The pair also told the That Gaby Roslin Podcast, which is released on Monday, how Birdie was treated in intensive care shortly after being born last October.

Georgia said: “Our baby was very ill. But because our NHS is amazing, they saved her.” David said: “We were very lucky.”

Birdie is thought to have had her first screen role alongside her parents when the couple co-starred as themselves in BBC comedy series Staged which was filmed in their home during lockdown.

David portrayed the Doctor between 2005 and 2010

In June, David Tennant and Georgia acted alongside each other in the BBC drama.

Tennant and Michael Sheen starred as two actors whose West End play has been put on hold due to Covid-19, but whose director has persuaded them to try to rehearse on Zoom.

Tennant and Sheen took on more petulant and egotistical versions of himself with Georgia also playing herself and Sheen’s real life girlfriend Anna Lundberg also involved.

David also told the podcast that when he was three he informed his family he wanted to be the Doctor.





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Sir David Attenborough’s Blue Planet dubbed ‘most influential TV show ever’


Sir David Attenborough’s Blue Planet has been named the most influential TV show ever.

It took more than a third of the vote after highlighting the impact of single-use plastic on our oceans.

Sir David, 94, also took the second spot with his Planet Earth series, which helped raise awareness of the natural world.

But it’s not just documentaries that change how viewers think.

Next on the list was Killing Eve, starring Jodie Comer as assassin Villanelle – meaning the top three spots were taken by BBC1 shows.

Classic comedy Gavin & Stacey and fantasy drama Game of Thrones also made the top 10 in the Freeview poll of 2,000.

Sir David Attenborough

Viewers spend an average five and a half hours a week chatting to friends, family and workmates about what they have watched.

Four in 10 of those polled said TV has the ability to change people’s perception of the world.

A third said their awareness of mental health issues and how racism impacts society had improved through TV shows.

His new show has been named as the ‘most influential’

A quarter said TV made them more aware of issues connected to sexuality and a fifth of gender equality.

Owen Jenkinson of Freeview said: “The majority think TV is a more powerful medium than cinema because there is more time to explore issues and TV is more accessible.”

Do you have a story to sell? Get in touch with us at [email protected] or call us direct 0207 29 33033.





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With a transparent dress, David Bisbal’s wife, Rosanna Zanetti, showed off her beauty and pregnancy | The NY Journal


The pregnancy of Rosanna Zanetti, the wife of singer David Bisbal, was reason enough for her to feel sexy and wear a suit that showed her entire body

Rosanna Zanetti and David Bisbal.

Photo:
Álvaro Cabrera / Getty Images

To the couple formed by David Bisbal Y Rosanna zanetti He only has a few weeks left to welcome their second child together, a girl who will soon become the boy’s best playmate Matteo, first-born of the marriage, and of the adorable She, the first daughter of the Almeria interpreter and his ex-partner Elena Tablada.

To celebrate this exciting final stretch, the Venezuelan actress has once again made herself available to the most professional cameras to star in an elegant photoshoot that, of course, portray her dazzling with her bulging pregnant belly and the elegant outfits for which she has chosen to be immortalized. The snapshots, in which the artist has also participated, have not needed any text to express the illusion with which the two lovers face this sweet wait.

One of the issues that has raised the highest levels of debate in the comments section of the photographs lies precisely in the dimensions of her tummy, which is apparently more voluminous than the one she had. Rosanna in your first pregnancy. She, for her part, has not entered to assess this hypothesis, although she did acknowledge at the time that she was experiencing some mobility problems that she did not remember with such intensity from her previous experience in motherhood.

“So we go, almost nine months. Swollen, certain shoes or rings no longer fit me, sleeping great [nótese la ironía de sus palabras]If something falls to the ground, it ceases to exist for me. Bend? What is that? I’m not so agile at this point, but it’s the last stage“, Revealed in another Instagram post.

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Police review ‘race hate’ probe into journalist Darren Grimes and David Starkey


Police are set to review a ‘race hate’ investigation against journalist Darren Grimes and David Starkey to ensure it’s ‘proportionate,’ after the historian referred to the ‘damn blacks,’ during a YouTube interview.  

Scotland Yard launched a probe against Mr Grimes, 27, for allegedly stirring up racial hatred, after sharing his interview with Starkey 75.

During the interview, radio presenter and author Mr Starkey claimed ‘slavery was not genocide, otherwise there wouldn’t be so many damn blacks in Africa or in Britain’ at the height of the Black Lives Matter protests. 

Scotland Yard’s decision to probe Mr Grimes has sparked a freedom of speech backlash from politicians and journalists.

Home Secretary Priti Patel, ex-Home Secretary Sajid Javid and former Lib Dem leader Tim Farron have all slammed the Met Police’s pursuit of Mr Grimes. 

Lord Macdonald, a former Director of Public Prosecutions, called the police probe ‘sinister and foolish’ and described the investigation as a ‘political stunt’.

Today Mr Grimes tweeted that Metropolitan Police was reviewing its investigation – and that he would not be interviewed by an officer.

He said: ‘The police have cancelled my interview with them on Friday and announced a “senior officer” has been appointed to conduct a review into the investigation to ensure it “remains proportionate”. They say they’ll update me in “due course”.

Journalist Darren Grimes says he will demand a copy of the Crown Prosecution Service’s advice to police, warning the investigation into him set a ‘dangerous,’ precedent

Mr Grimes, 27, is accused of stirring up racial hatred after sharing an interview on YouTube with historian David Starkey, who claimed 'slavery was not genocide, otherwise there wouldn't be so many damn blacks in Africa or in Britain'

Mr Grimes, 27, is accused of stirring up racial hatred after sharing an interview on YouTube with historian David Starkey, who claimed ‘slavery was not genocide, otherwise there wouldn’t be so many damn blacks in Africa or in Britain’

Mr Grimes said he would be requesting a copy for the Crown Prosecution Service’s advice to police, whether officers decide to proceed or not, warning it set a ‘dangerous,’ precedent. 

He added: ‘This vexatious claim against me should never have been investigated. At a time when many have been propelled into misery as a consequence of the lockdown strategy, it is a gross abuse of taxpayer cash and police time.

‘We need an urgent review of the unprecedented use of this legislation to attack press freedom. The worrying thing is that had it been someone unable to kick up a fuss like I did they would have been hauled in and had to face police action over a vexatious complaint like this.

‘Scotland Yard has said a senior officer would be looking at the investigation to see if it was “proportionate”.’ 

Toby Young, from the Free Speech Union, said: ‘I’m relieved that this is over, but alarmed that the police embarked on this witch-hunt in the first place.

‘Dr David Starkey’s words never came anywhere near meeting the threshold for stirring yup racial hatred, let alone Darren Grime’s decision to broadcast them.

‘The Free Speech Union was able to find a top criminal solicitor to defend them and helped galvanise support across the media and in Government. But for every person we’re able to help, ninety=-nine go undefended. 

‘Everyone should be defending the right to free speech, not just those on the frontline. If you don’t stick up for the speech rights of contrarians – even those who offend people – the authorities will eventually come after you.’   

Darren Grimes said a senior Met Police officer was reviewing an investigation into him and Mr Starkey to see if it was 'proportionate'

Darren Grimes said a senior Met Police officer was reviewing an investigation into him and Mr Starkey to see if it was ‘proportionate’

In a statement, Metropolitan Police confirmed Mr Grimes’ update.

A spokesperson from the Met Police said: ‘On 4 July, the Metropolitan Police Service was passed an allegation from Durham Police of a public order offence relating to a social media video posted on 30 June.

‘The matter was reviewed by officers and on 29 July a file was submitted to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) for early investigative advice.

‘On 25 September early investigative advice was received and officers began an investigation. 

‘No arrests have been made.On Monday, 12 October a senior officer was appointed to conduct a review of the investigation to ensure it remains proportionate and that all appropriate lines of inquiry are being considered.

‘Whilst this process takes place, two scheduled interviews have been postponed. We remain in contact with the CPS.’ 

Since the investigation has come to light, Mr Grimes has also been backed by Douglas Murray, associate editor of The Spectator magazine, and the Free Speech Union, whose general secretary Toby Young called the Met’s inquiry ‘absurd’.

The blogger, who came to prominence as a pro-Brexit campaigner, admitted he should have ‘robustly questioned’ Starkey about his comments, but said the decision to investigate him raises ‘serious repercussions for freedom of expression’.

Yesterday, Mr Grimes turned his fire on the BBC for staying silent on what he called ‘one of the most important cases regarding freedom of speech in this country’. 

Starkey, 75, has apologised for his ‘blundering use of language’ but warned that the probe would ‘further chill public debate and freedom of expression’.

Starkey also said he would fight against any allegation of criminal wrongdoing. 

In an exclusive statement to MailOnline, Mr Grimes said: ‘I must admit that I am not used to such silence from the BBC when it comes to attempts to take me to court.

‘It does seem strange that when a former director of public prosecutions, the Home Secretary, the former Chancellor and a host of others have spoken out about the importance of the law protecting freedom of speech, and the absurdity of the Met’s actions, that our national broadcaster should stay so silent.

‘Surely the threat of facing prosecution for remarks made by guests in interviews is something that should greatly trouble any broadcaster?

‘This is one of the most important cases regarding freedom of speech in this country and yet the BBC has said nothing – I’d suggest that they are failing in their obligation to inform the nation.’

Journalist Darren Grimes has accused the BBC of 'failing in its obligation to inform the nation' by not reporting the Metropolitan Police's probe into his interview with David Starkey

Journalist Darren Grimes has accused the BBC of ‘failing in its obligation to inform the nation’ by not reporting the Metropolitan Police’s probe into his interview with David Starkey

Mr Grimes, Ben Bradley MP and Toby Young, general secretary of the Free Speech Union, are all questioning the BBC's silence on the Met Police's investigation of the Right-wing blogger. Mr Young said Tim Davie, the BBC's new Director General (pictured), should have been 'one of the first people to condemn this assault on the freedom of the press'

Mr Grimes, Ben Bradley MP and Toby Young, general secretary of the Free Speech Union, are all questioning the BBC’s silence on the Met Police’s investigation of the Right-wing blogger. Mr Young said Tim Davie, the BBC’s new Director General (pictured), should have been ‘one of the first people to condemn this assault on the freedom of the press’

Mr Bradley, the Tory MP for Mansfield, told MailOnline: ‘Frustrating that media outlets that were so keen to publicise Darren’s previous run ins with the Electoral Commission as an attack on Vote Leave, but subsequently did not really publicise those charges being dropped, seem so reticent to publicise his case now… particularly as the implications for media and journalism are quite stark, if interviewers can be criminalised for the views of their interviewees. 

‘You’d think that would be something that the BBC took very seriously.’

Mr Young, general secretary of the Free Speech Union, took aim at Tim Davie, the BBC’s new Director General, claiming he should have been ‘one of the first people to condemn this assault on the freedom of the press’.  

‘If Darren Grimes is threatened with arrest because someone he interviewed said something controversial, then Jeremy Vine will be next.

‘But instead the BBC has decided to ignore the story altogether. The sad truth is the leadership of the BBC has been captured by the Woke cult.’ 

Tim Farron, the former Lib Dem leader, added: ‘There might be more than meets the eye here, but on the face of it this is completely ridiculous'

Tim Farron, the former Lib Dem leader, added: ‘There might be more than meets the eye here, but on the face of it this is completely ridiculous’

However, the Met Police have come under fire for its decision to investigate Grimes, with Tory backbencher Sajid Javid calling the decision ‘plainly absurd’

However, the Met Police have come under fire for its decision to investigate Grimes, with Tory backbencher Sajid Javid calling the decision ‘plainly absurd’

Ben Bradley, Conservative MP for Mansfield, angrily tweeted: ‘God save the world when people being offended makes something a criminal offence!!'

Ben Bradley, Conservative MP for Mansfield, angrily tweeted: ‘God save the world when people being offended makes something a criminal offence!!’

Douglas Murray, author and editor of The Spectator magazine, said: This is not the behaviour of a police force in a free society. 'Hauling someone into a police station for something someone said to them in an interview? Shame on the @metpolice uk'

Douglas Murray, author and editor of The Spectator magazine, said: This is not the behaviour of a police force in a free society. ‘Hauling someone into a police station for something someone said to them in an interview? Shame on the @metpolice uk’

Calvin Robinson of Defund the BBC said: ‘A young, independent journalist is being interviewed by the police, under caution, and stands accused of a public order offence of stirring up racial hatred over remarks made by a guest during an interview – and yet the BBC have remained strangely silent on the issue.

‘The BBC is obliged by its charter to deliver journalistic excellence, not this editorialising of the news to fit their campaign agenda.’ 

A spokesman for the BBC declined to comment. 

Today TV historian Starkey said he is also being investigated by the Met Police. His incendiary comments, made during the height of the Black Lives Matter protests, led to his resignation from his fellowship at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge. 

He also lost a book deal with HarperCollins and apologised for his remark. 

The Met Police wrote to Grimes on October 7, asking him to attend an interview he was accused of stirring up racial hatred by sharing his interview on YouTube.  

In a statement, Starkey said the Met Police sent him an email via his inbox at the Bow Group, a conservative think-tank where he is a Vice-President.

However, Starkey said the Group binned the email after assuming it was a hoax, owing to its ‘wording’. He said the ‘effect of this delay and confusion has been to throw the focus of the police investigation wholly on Mr Grimes’, which he called ‘unfortunate and grossly unfair’.

Starkey apologised for making the remarks during the hour-long interview with Grimes, but denied committing a public order offence. He continued: ‘The focus on Mr Grimes has raised fundamental questions about the freedom of the press and public debate.

The Public Order Act 

Grimes is being investigated by the Met Police under the Public Order Act.

Before the introduction of the Public Order Act 1986, policing public order was based on various relevant common law offences, and the Public Order Act 1936.

Several factors influenced the introduction of the Public Order Act 1986. Significant public disorder, such as the Southall riot in 1979, the Brixton riot that extended to other cities in 1981, and the national miner’s strike and associated disorder between 1984 and 1985 – in particular the Battle of Orgreave in June 1984 – and the Battle of the Beanfield in June 1985.

Furthermore, the 1983 Law Commission report, Criminal Law: Offences Relating to Public Order recommended updating the law.

However, the police have been accused of misusing its powers. During the 2009 G20 London summit protests, for example, journalists were forced to leave the protests by police who threatened them with arrest.

Scotland Yard’s investigation of Grimes has been criticised by free-speech advocates because it stretches the use of the 1986 Act. 

According to the Crown Prosecution Service: ‘The purpose of public order law is to ensure that individual rights to freedom of speech and freedom of assembly are balanced against the rights of others to go about their daily lives unhindered.’

‘As I said in my original apology, my principal concern was that my blundering use of language and the penalties it has incurred would further chill public debate and freedom of expression.

‘This fear is being fulfilled more quickly than I thought. And it is shared by many senior voices of all political persuasions who have intervened to say that this police investigation is neither proportionate nor in the best interests of preserving proper freedom of expression and reporting.

‘Despite this, I will, of course, cooperate with the police in this matter.’

He added: ‘This morning, Tuesday, October 13, I was forwarded an email from the Metropolitan Police. It was sent on October 7, the same day that the Met also approached Mr Grimes. His email reached him directly. Mine, however, was sent to The Bow Group.

‘Though I have a titular position as a Vice-President, I have no day-to-day contact with the Group. At the time, the wording of the email led the Group to assume that it was a hoax, of which they receive a great many, and it was binned.

‘The recent press publicity about the Met’s approach to Mr Grimes made the Group realise that it might be genuine and, as I have said, it was sent to me early this morning.

‘The effect of this delay and confusion has been to throw the focus of the police investigation wholly on Mr Grimes. This is unfortunate and grossly unfair.

‘Mr Grimes is a young, aspiring journalist and his role in the affair is – at most – secondary. I have apologised unreservedly for the words used and I do so again today. It was a serious error for which I have already paid a significant price.

‘I did not, however, intend to stir up racial hatred and there was nothing about the circumstances of the broadcast which made it likely to do so. The remarks occurred in the context of an interview which lasted close to an hour and in which I celebrated the contribution of BAME people to British history and culture.

‘I will defend myself robustly against any allegation of criminal wrongdoing.’  

In a statement to The Daily Telegraph, Mr Grimes said the police investigation had ‘serious repercussions for freedom of expression’. 

Mr Young, general secretary of the Free Speech Union, told MailOnline: ‘The suggestion that Dr David Starkey may be guilty of stirring up racial hatred is absurd. 

‘The only person he stirred up hatred against is himself and he has paid a heavy price for it. He has also unreservedly apologised for his remarks.

‘The Public Order Act, which criminalises stirring up racial hatred, is intended to preserve public order, not regulate speech and debate.

‘If the police start abusing it in this way to intimidate and harass people who dissent from woke orthodoxy they will undermine the rule of law.’

Meanwhile, Ian Murray, executive director of the Society of Editors, which aims to protect media freedom, said the organisation was ‘deeply concerned by the threat such an investigation poses to free speech and the chilling effect it could have on the media’s ability to interview controversial figures’. 

Lord Macdonald of River Glaven told The Times that ‘offensiveness is not a crime and for the police now, weeks later, to target the journalist who interviewed him is both sinister and foolish’.

He added: ‘It looks like they are letting themselves be used as part of a political stunt – and, what’s worse, a stunt that is deeply threatening to free speech.’

Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer yesterday came under fire for refusing to criticise Scotland Yard’s pursuit of Mr Grimes while speaking on LBC.

He said he believed the authorities had to investigate people to ‘go over the line’, adding: ‘I think it does sometimes have to involve the police.

‘There has got to be a level of tolerance of course, but there is a line which can be crossed, and it’s very important that it is investigated, and in some cases prosecutions. When people go over the line it’s right that it’s investigated.’  

The case will be raised at the Commons home affairs committee this week by Conservative MP Tim Loughton, who said Met Commissioner Cressida Dick should be questioned over a ‘vexatious investigation’.

Former Lib Dem leader Tim Farron said: ‘Grimes is not responsible for Starkey’s appalling comments. In a free society, we surely don’t do things like this?’ 

Starkey made the comments on Mr Grimes’s YouTube channel on June 30, at the peak of the Black Lives Matter protests. He later apologised for his ‘bad mistake’.

Mr Grimes, who founded pro-Brexit group BeLeave during the 2016 referendum, called for a change in hate crime laws to protect journalists.

He added in a ‘free and democratic’ society, journalists must be free to ‘interview a wide range of people, including those likely to make controversial remarks’. 



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Brooklyn Beckham teams up with dad David to shoot sultry fashion video in Paris


David Beckham has made fans swoon while oozing specs appeal for the launch of his latest fashion launch.

The 45-year-old footballing ace set pulses racing as he smouldered for the launch of his new eyewear range.

Proudly sharing snaps with his 64.3 million Instagram followers, David revealed who the talent behind the camera for the campaign’s video was.

The father-of-four enlisted his oldest son Brooklyn to shoot the behind-the-scenes of the campaign, with the pair even jetting over to Paris to film a gorgeous video.

Brooklyn captured his dad’s smouldering good looks in the short film which follows David in Paris on an beautiful autumn day while shooting the AW20 collection with photographer Matthew Brookes.

The father-of-four enlisted his oldest son Brooklyn to shoot the behind-the-scenes of the campaign

Peeks of the iconic Eiffel Tower can be seen behind him as he shows off his glasses for the sultry fashion shoot.

David and Brooklyn’s collaboration came just a week after it was reported David and his wife Victoria Beckham had ‘secretly caught coronavirus‘ at a party in Los Angeles some months ago.

The couple were allegedly struck down by the deadly virus earlier this year and made the whole family quarantine for more than two weeks.

Some of their staff and family members also reportedly came down with the symptoms at the time.

The 45-year-old footballing ace set pulses racing as he smouldered for the launch of his new eyewear range

At the time, the former Spice Girl was fearful that her family might spread the virus and took extra safety precautions to keep everyone isolated at their Cotswolds home.

The Beckhams decided to keep their alleged coronavirus ordeal to themselves and went on to make a full recovery.

Throughout the lockdown, they also urged others to follow the rules with Victoria saying to followers: “We all need to do our part in staying home and helping these incredible workers and their colleagues on the front line.”

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David McGoldrick outlines Sheffield United’s response to their losing start


David McGoldrick claims Sheffield United are not panicking over their dreadful start to the season.

Chris Wilder’s Blades have lost their first four Premier League games and McGoldrick’s goal against Arsenal is the only strike they have managed.

United, who finished ninth last season, face Fulham at Bramall Lane in a high-noon relegation shoot-out on Sunday and McGoldrick insists they are close to turning their narrow losses into wins.

“We’ve just got to keep going and get back to what we’re good at in both boxes, keeping the ball out of the net and scoring goals,” said the striker.

“We’ll get back to it, there’s no doubt about that. We’re four games in and there’s no panic button being pressed yet.

Chris Wilder feels the Blades are playing better than their results suggest

“We’ve got to take it to the next game. We went to Arsenal with the mentality of getting something.

“We knew we were in the game, but we had a sloppy period and got punished by a top side.

Chris Wilder hopes new record signing Rhian Brewster can help transform their fortunes

“We haven’t been at our best, we know that, but we’ve been in most of the games.

“We had a sloppy six minutes in our first game against Wolves and got punished, the Villa game… I can go on, but we’re still in games.

“If we up our levels, which I know we can, we’ll be able to fight our way through this league again.”





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David Walliams discovers life-changing family secret about great-grandad


David Walliams has discovered his paternal great-grandfather was a First World War hero driven insane by the horrors of battle.

The Britain’s Got Talent star also found out in BBC1’s Who Do You Think You Are? that he is descended from a blind traveller who begged for a living as an organ-grinder.

John George Boorman, a married labourer with three kids, enlisted in the Grenadier Guards in 1914 aged 32.

By 1915 he was in the trenches, facing a landscape ravaged by shells and strewn with corpses. Looking at a picture, Walliams says: “If you want to imagine hell, it’s like this.”

Shell-shocked after a few months, he returned to Britain but was sent back to the slaughter of the Somme in 1916.

David Walliams appeared on Who Do You Think You Are? and made the discovery

He later fought at the bloody battle of Passchendaele.

Visiting the site of the trenches, Walliams, 49, is told that his great grandad was sent over the top to face the Germans at 4.30am on July 31, 1917, shells flying and bodies all around him.

Shaken Walliams says: “Death is everywhere. Terrifying.”

Wounded, the horror stayed and in 1919 John was sent to an asylum in Surrey.

Granny Ivy Boorman (David’s paternal grandmother) with him as a baby

Alfred Walter and Kate Haines (David Walliams’ maternal great grandparents) with his great uncle James and grandmother Violet as children

He sadly died there in 1962.Walliams’ great-great-grandfather on his mother’s side, William Haines, was also struck by tragedy when he was blinded by surgery to correct cataracts in the 1880s.

In 1896, he left Salisbury to beg at Portsmouth docks with an organ, a monkey and two of his kids.

Walliams laughs: “A blind musician from Portsmouth? The perfect BGT contestant. He’d win hands down.”

British soldiers go “over the top” from a trench in France World War One 1916 Battle of the Somme

John James Boorman as a child – David Walliams’ paternal great-grandad

By 1911, William was running a variety of funfair attractions and the family were making a good living, helped in no small part by William’s “energetic and dynamic wife” Julia.

Visiting the sort of wagon the family would have lived in, Walliams declares: “It’s beautiful. What an extraordinary lifestyle. I had no idea I came from travelling people. My granny never mentioned it.”

*Who Do You Think You Are? Next Monday, October 19, 9pm BBC1.

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Victoria Beckham shares rare intimate snap with David as they cuddle up in bed


Victoria Beckham has treated her fans to a rare glimpse into home life with husband David.

The former Spice Girls singer, 46, enjoyed a lazy October Sunday at home with her handsome hubby.

The lovebirds – who share children Brookyln, Romeo, Cruz and Harper together – cosied up to one another as they enjoyed some quiet time in their Cotswolds mansion.

Taking to Instagram on Sunday afternoon, the gorgeous fashion designer allowed fans the opportunity to have sneak peek into her relationship with football star David as she snapped a sweet moment together.

While David snoozed the day away, Victoria captured the moment as she lay happily on his chest – looking as chic as ever.

Victoria Beckham has treated her fans to a rare glimpse into home life with husband David

Later in the day, the fashionista and make-up mogul took to her stories again to showcase her daughter Harper’s latest art creation.

The talented nine-year-old created a homemade candle for her beloved mum and dad with the words “I love you” engraved on the outside shell.

Victoria’s sneaky snap of David may not go down to well when he eventually lays eyes on it after he recently banned his wife from being on her phone too much.

David has banned all phones from the Beckham home in the evenings

The sports star was believed to have issued a phone-ban at home so he and Vicky can reconnect with each other during the evenings.

He reportedly wants to enjoy some time away from technology so he and his wife can talk and show more affection towards each other.

A source recently told Heat : “He does sometimes feel like Vic’s always got her phone in her hand, so he’s told her he wants device-free evenings at home.

David wants to reconnect with his wife

“He thinks the entire family will benefit.”

Last month, Posh and Becks swapped their family home for a luxurious stay at health retreat Villa Stephanie in Baden Baden, in a bid to focus on reconnecting.

Victoria has always dreamed of having a solo spa break with her husband after just over two decades of marriage.

Posh, who has stayed at the seven-star retreat a few times before, joked it was her “ultimate fantasy”.

The Beckhams have spent lockdown in their £6m Cotswolds mansion

It seems like their break at the £20,000-per-person hotel has worked in Vic’s favour.

The source added: “They’ve already committed to do it twice a year. David is a total convert and he really enjoyed the time away.”

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