Categories
Canada

Agreement in principle between blue collar workers and Montreal

The City of Montreal finally came to an agreement with its blue-collar workers on Saturday after three years without an employment contract, the two parties announced Monday.

The agreement in principle concluded between the City and the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) on the night of Friday to Saturday, if it is approved by the union members, will make it possible to endow blue collar workers with an employment contract until in 2024.

The previous employment contract of some 6,000 blue-collar workers expired in December 2017. A blitz of negotiations spread over the last two months, in the presence of a mediator, made it possible to resolve the impasse between the employer and its employees. workers.

Neither the City nor CUPE has unveiled the terms of the new employment contract which would run for seven years, retroactively from December 2017 to December 2024.

The mayoress of Montreal, Valérie Plante, however assured, in a written declaration, that the agreement “makes it possible to combine respect for the ability to pay of Montreal taxpayers with the need to recognize the work and dedication of blue collar workers who devote their career in the public service. “

“This is excellent news a few days before the holidays! We are proud that an industrial peace will be guaranteed for Montrealers until the end of 2024, ”said the president of the Union des cols brûlées de Montréal, Luc Bisson, in a press release.

Remember that the blue-collar workers voted in favor of new pressure tactics that could go as far as an indefinite general strike on November 15.

Categories
Canada

Dismissal of a blue collar worker maintained in Montreal


TVA Nouvelles got its hands on a recent decision by a grievance arbitrator who rejected the arguments of a blue collar worker from the City of Montreal “who practiced unionism from another era” and thus upheld his dismissal.

The complainant Éric Filion, a mechanic employed by the City since 2001, contested his dismissal of July 5, 2018.

A month before his dismissal, a work climate investigation report had revealed a series of disrespectful and intimidating behavior directed towards a significant number of co-workers.

This report shows that Eric Filion had frequently used disparaging remarks towards co-workers such as: “the fat crisse”, “brown nose” or “incompetent” and several others.

A significant number of colleagues also reported on his violent and intimidating behavior towards them. The report also revealed a series of dishonest tactics and maneuvers on his part to slow down the work and encourage his colleagues to do the same.

In his decision, referee Me Marcel Morin firmly flays the former union team of blue-collar workers gathered in Montreal and deplores “the extremely narrow vision of the employee, contrary to the texts of the job description of a mechanic (motorized devices) (E-20). For him, a mechanic does not do any welding or elementary bodywork work. He was therefore in constant conflict with his co-workers for whom these tasks expressly fall under the job description (…) Until 2017, he practiced unionism from another era with the support of certain union leaders who wanted to resolve the complainant’s problem within the union structure by wanting to silence those who denigrated him. Did they think for a moment that in doing so, they were unconsciously participating in his dismissal? ”

The arbitrator adds that “the evidence also revealed that the Employer gave the Complainant every opportunity to modify his behavior, but for him the bosses are the enemy (…) The Tribunal is of the opinion that certain union leaders have failed in their obligations with regard to Mr. Filion. Union representatives told Madison shop workers “they keep him on a leash.” We have to admit that the employees of this workshop were rather left to fend for themselves. ”



Source link

Categories
Headlines UK London

White collar Covid cull: John Lewis will axe 1,500 head office staff


John Lewis has announced today it is to cut 1,500 head office jobs in an effort to bolster the business in the devastating coronavirus pandemic.

The John Lewis Partnership revealed the cuts as part of the next phase of its five-year plan to return it to sustainable profits by 2025.

It is the latest blow of the high street bloodbath consuming retail in the wake of the Covid-19 outbreak.

John Lewis – famous for its Christmas ads – is widely seen as a benchmark for High Street performance in the UK. 

But it received a serious blow earlier this year after its Waitrose arm was ditched by Ocado in favour of Marks & Spencer. 

John Lewis announced it will cut 1,500 head office jobs to bolster the business

The news came on the same day Lloyds Banking Group has said it plans to cut another 1,070 jobs as it continues a major restructuring programme.

John Lewis said Patrick Lewis, Executive Director, Finance had also decided to leave at the end of this year ending a 26-year career.

Chairman Sharon White said: ‘Our Partnership Plan sets a course to create a thriving and sustainable business for the future.

Lloyds Banking Group has said it plans to cut another 1,070 jobs amid the continuing pandemic

Lloyds Banking Group has said it plans to cut another 1,070 jobs amid the continuing pandemic

What are the rules for shops from Thursday? 

Shops that can stay open:

  • Food shops
  • Supermarkets 
  • Garden centres 
  • Retailers providing essential goods and services 

Shops that must shut (including but not limited to): 

  • Clothing
  • Electronics stores 
  • Vehicle showrooms 
  • Travel agents 
  • Betting shops
  • Auction houses
  • Tailors 
  • Car washes 
  • Tobacco and vape shops  

‘To achieve this we must be agile and able to adapt quickly to the changing needs of our customers.”

‘Losing Partners is incredibly hard as an employee-owned business.

‘Wherever possible, we will seek to find new roles in the Partnership and we’ll provide the best support and retraining opportunities for Partners who leave us.’

It comes a month after its flagship department store in Oxford Street was granted permission to change some shopping areas into offices.

The third to the eighth floors of the building have been earmarked to have their uses transformed. 

Lloyds said its latest restructuring move will result in a net reduction of around 740 roles, as it will also create a further 330 positions across the business.

It is the latest set of redundancies after the group restarted its major restructuring programme following the pandemic.

In September, it said it would slash 865 jobs mainly in its insurance, wealth and retail teams. 

A Lloyds Banking Group spokeswoman said: ‘This morning we shared changes to some of our teams and we can confirm a net reduction of around 730 roles.

‘These changes reflect our ongoing plans to continue to meet our customers’ changing needs and make parts of our business simpler.

Lloyds Banking Group Plc's large company headquarters in Gresham Street, London

Lloyds Banking Group Plc’s large company headquarters in Gresham Street, London

More than 10 per cent of UK hospitality chiefs say they could axe 50 per cent or more of their workforce by the end of the year, a YouGov poll has revealed. Behind hospitality was real estate, where eight per cent of bosses revealed they could make cuts by Christmas, and transport and distribution firms, of which six per cent said they could cut 50 per cent of more of their workforce by the end of 2020

More than 10 per cent of UK hospitality chiefs say they could axe 50 per cent or more of their workforce by the end of the year, a YouGov poll has revealed. Behind hospitality was real estate, where eight per cent of bosses revealed they could make cuts by Christmas, and transport and distribution firms, of which six per cent said they could cut 50 per cent of more of their workforce by the end of 2020

The data reveals nearly a fifth (18 per cent) of education-based businesses could also make cuts of between 20 and 29 per cent of their workforce by the New Year, while a third of bosses at legal firms across the UK believe they will have to cut up to 10 per cent of their staff

The data reveals nearly a fifth (18 per cent) of education-based businesses could also make cuts of between 20 and 29 per cent of their workforce by the New Year, while a third of bosses at legal firms across the UK believe they will have to cut up to 10 per cent of their staff 

Bosses of large (more than 250 employees) and medium (50-249 staff) businesses, firms in the hospitality sector and those in Scotland and Wales were most likely to make the biggest cuts, with some warning of cuts of up to 60 per cent of their workforce, the YouGov figures reveal

Bosses of large (more than 250 employees) and medium (50-249 staff) businesses, firms in the hospitality sector and those in Scotland and Wales were most likely to make the biggest cuts, with some warning of cuts of up to 60 per cent of their workforce, the YouGov figures reveal

M&S shoppers book slots 

Shoppers at Marks & Spencer can now jump the lockdown supermarket queue by booking a timed slot to enter the chain’s food halls.

With lockdown two starting on Thursday amid plunging temperatures, dismal scenes of supermarket queues and already booked out online delivery slots look set to become all too familiar once again.

Dubbed ‘Sparks Book and Shop’, M&S shoppers with or without a Sparks loyalty card can now visit its website and book a guaranteed time slot to shop at their local store without having to queue.

After a trial across 80 stores in Scotland and Wales, the scheme is now available to use across all M&S’s 566 food halls and larger stores containing food halls. 

Dominic Roberts, a store manager at M&S in Pontardulais, said: ‘At a time when it’s been hard to plan ahead, customers like the certainty of being able to book a slot and we’ve received great feedback about the service – especially as restrictions have increased.’

The move may prove popular for those who like to do a physical shop rather than head online to get groceries in.

‘The majority of colleagues briefed today will not leave until January at the earliest.

‘We will help colleagues who are affected find new roles and redeployment opportunities wherever possible.

‘Everyone will be given access to a package of training and support designed to help them secure their next position, whether within or outside of our business.

‘Change does mean making difficult decisions and our focus remains on supporting our customers, colleagues and communities.’

Rob MacGregor, Unite national officer, said: ‘Unite cannot comprehend why LBG would choose to cut 1,000 staff who have given the bank such commitment and dedication during a global pandemic.

‘These staff have worked tirelessly despite any risks to themselves.’

These latest cuts come less than a fortnight after it told most of its 65,000 staff to work from home until spring at the earliest.

Lloyds wants them to stay away from the office for at least the next five months.

It said it was following Government guidance urging employees to work remotely if they can.

The move by the bank came as a blow to the City of London, where it employs thousands.

About two-thirds are working from home, but staff are still serving customers at its 890 branches. 

Chris Williamson, an economist at the business consultancy IHS Markit, warned: ‘The pace of economic growth slowed in October to the weakest since recovery from the national lockdown began.’

Other large firms are closing offices or asking employees if they want to work from home for ever.

The consultancy Deloitte could shut four offices, which would leave 500 people working from home. 

How nearly 215,000 job losses have been revealed by major UK firms since lockdown began 

Some 214,651 job losses have been announced by major British employers since the start of the coronavirus lockdown in March as follows:

  • November 4 – John Lewis – 1,500 
  • November 4 – Lloyds – 1,070 
  • October 29 – Pizza Express – 1,300 
  • October 7 – Greene King – 800 
  • October 6 – Virgin Money – 400 
  • October 6 – Vp – 150 
  • October 5 – Cineworld – 5,500 (many cuts likely to be temporary) 
  • September 30 – TSB – 900 
  • September 30 – Shell – 9,000 worldwide 
  • September 29 – Ferguson – 1,200
  • September 22 – Wetherspoon – 400 to 450
  • September 22 – Whitbread – 6,000
  • September 18 – Investec – 210
  • September 15 – Waitrose – 124
  • September 14 – London City Airport – 239
  • September 9 – Lloyds Bank – 865
  • September 9 – Pizza Hut – 450
  • September 4 – Virgin Atlantic – 1,150
  • September 3 – Costa – 1,650
  • August 27 – Pret a Manger – 2,800 (includes 1,000 announced on July 6)
  • August 26 – Gatwick Airport – 600
  • August 25 – Co-operative Bank – 350
  • August 20 – Alexander Dennis – 650
  • August 18 – Bombardier – 95
  • August 18 – Marks & Spencer – 7,000
  • August 14 – Yo! Sushi – 250
  • August 14 – River Island – 350
  • August 12 – NatWest – 550
  • August 11 – InterContinental Hotels – 650 worldwide
  • August 11 – Debenhams – 2,500
  • August 7 – Evening Standard – 115
  • August 6 – Travelex – 1,300
  • August 6 – Wetherspoons – 110 to 130
  • August 5 – M&Co – 380
  • August 5 – Arsenal FC – 55
  • August 5 – WH Smith – 1,500
  • August 4 – Dixons Carphone – 800
  • August 4 – Pizza Express – 1,100 at risk
  • August 3 – Hays Travel – up to 878
  • August 3 – DW Sports – 1,700 at risk
  • July 31 – Byron – 651
  • July 30 – Pendragon – 1,800
  • July 29 – Waterstones – unknown number of head office roles
  • July 28 – Selfridges – 450
  • July 27 – Oak Furnitureland – 163 at risk
  • July 23 – Dyson – 600 in UK, 300 overseas
  • July 22 – Mears – fewer than 200
  • July 20 – Marks & Spencer – 950 at risk
  • July 17 – Azzurri Group (owns Zizzi and Ask Italian) – up to 1,200
  • July 16 – Genting – 1,642 at risk
  • July 16 – Burberry – 150 in UK, 350 overseas
  • July 15 – Banks Mining – 250 at risk
  • July 15 – Buzz Bingo – 573 at risk
  • July 14 – Vertu – 345 July 14 – DFS – up to 200 at risk
  • July 9 – General Electric – 369
  • July 9 – Eurostar – unknown number
  • July 9 – Boots – 4,000
  • July 9 – John Lewis – 1,300 at risk
  • July 9 – Burger King – 1,600 at risk
  • July 7 – Reach (owns Daily Mirror and Daily Express newspapers) – 550
  • July 6 – Pret a Manger – 1,000 at risk
  • July 2 – Casual Dining Group (owns Bella Italia and Cafe Rouge) – 1,909
  • July 1 – SSP (owns Upper Crust) – 5,000 at risk
  • July 1 – Arcadia (owns TopShop) – 500
  • July 1 – Harrods – 700
  • July 1 – Virgin Money – 300
  • June 30 – Airbus – 1,700
  • June 30 – TM Lewin – 600
  • June 30 – Smiths Group – ‘some job losses’
  • June 25 – Royal Mail – 2,000
  • June 24 – Jet2 – 102
  • June 24 – Swissport – 4,556
  • June 24 – Crest Nicholson – 130
  • June 23 – Shoe Zone – unknown number of jobs in head office
  • June 19 – Aer Lingus – 500
  • June 17 – HSBC – unknown number of jobs in UK, 35,000 worldwide
  • June 15 – Jaguar Land Rover – 1,100
  • June 15 – Travis Perkins – 2,500
  • June 12 – Le Pain Quotidien – 200
  • June 11 – Heathrow – at least 500
  • June 11 – Bombardier – 600
  • June 11 – Johnson Matthey – 2,500
  • June 11 – Centrica – 5,000
  • June 10 – Quiz – 93
  • June 10 – The Restaurant Group (owns Frankie and Benny’s) – 3,000
  • June 10 – Monsoon Accessorise – 545
  • June 10 – Everest Windows – 188
  • June 8 – BP – 10,000 worldwide
  • June 8 – Mulberry – 375
  • June 5 – Victoria’s Secret – 800 at risk
  • June 5 – Bentley – 1,000
  • June 4 – Aston Martin – 500
  • June 4 – Lookers – 1,500
  • May 29 – Belfast International Airport – 45
  • May 28 – Debenhams (in second announcement) – ‘hundreds’ of jobs
  • May 28 – EasyJet – 4,500 worldwide
  • May 26 – McLaren – 1,200
  • May 22 – Carluccio’s – 1,000
  • May 21 – Clarks – 900
  • May 20 – Rolls-Royce – 9,000
  • May 20 – Bovis Homes – unknown number
  • May 19 – Ovo Energy – 2,600
  • May 19 – Antler – 164
  • May 15 – JCB – 950 at risk
  • May 13 – Tui – 8,000 worldwide
  • May 12 – Carnival UK (owns P&O Cruises and Cunard) – 450
  • May 11 – P&O Ferries – 1,100 worldwide
  • May 5 – Virgin Atlantic – 3,150
  • May 1 – Ryanair – 3,000 worldwide
  • April 30 – Oasis Warehouse – 1,800
  • April 29 – WPP – unknown number
  • April 28 – British Airways – 12,000
  • April 23 – Safran Seats – 400
  • April 23 – Meggitt – 1,800 worldwide
  • April 21 – Cath Kidston – 900
  • April 17 – Debenhams – 422
  • March 31 – Laura Ashley – 268
  • March 30 – BrightHouse – 2,400 at risk
  • March 27 – Chiquito – 1,500 at risk



Source link

Categories
Headline USA

Couple offers accommodation to “friend” at home; they tie him up with a pet collar and break him down to the teeth | The NY Journal


Image illustrating a kidnapping.

Photo:
Noelle Otto / Pexels

A couple in Michigan were accused of torture to a man who was staying at his house, fitting him with an electric collar for pets.

The case became known to the authorities after the police found the victim hiding in bushes on October 22 near a house in the city of Inkster and transferred him to a hospital.

According to local media such as Fox 2, the subject, whose name has not been disclosed, was attacked by Vera Miller, 38, and Corey Hill, 30, whom he had known for years, a period in which they had not had problems. When he was left homeless, so-called friends offered him to sleep on the couch at home in exchange for a monthly payment of $ 400.

However, the stay turned into hell. The duo not only took money out of his paycheck after asking for his bank details, they subjected him to brutal abuse ranging from burning him with boiling water, breaking his teeth and chewing on a towel soaked in dog urine.

In addition, they whipped him with cables, burned his nipples with a lighter and hit him in the face with a board, according to police.

Doctors who examined him discovered that the victim had scars, bruises, blisters, burns and cuts on various parts of the body.

The man told the authorities that he had not reported his executioners for fear that they would kill him and his family. Hill and Miller face charges of torture, deprivation of liberty and assault.

.



Source link

Categories
Headline USA

two-year-old girl loses arm while trying to grab wolf-dog’s collar


Two-year-old girl loses her arm after getting it stuck in fence after she put her hand in to grab wolf-dog hybrid’s collar at Michigan sanctuary owned by her grandmother

  • Sophia Scraver, two, lost arm while during a visit to Howling Timbers sanctuary
  • According to her grandmother, Brenda Pearson, who founded the sanctuary, it’s believed Sophia was trying to grab a wolf-dog’s collar in the July incident 
  • Pearson believes the dog then pulled, causing Sophia’s arm to get stuck in a portion of the fenced-in area     
  • Family friend started a GoFundMe to raise money for prosthetic arm for Sophia
  • Pearson, who collects wolf-dogs from across US, said dog won’t be euthanized

A two-year-old girl lost her arm while reaching for the collar of a wolf-dog hybrid at her grandmother’s sanctuary in Michigan. 

Brenda Pearson founded the Howling Timbers animal sanctuary in West Bloomfield, Michigan, where Sophia Scraver lost a portion of her arm during the July incident. 

Initial reports indicated that the animal had attacked the little girl but Pearson explained to DailyMail.com that she doesn’t think the animal attacked Sophia. 

‘I don’t believe there was an attack because there were no bites wounds at all from the elbow to the tip of the fingers,’ Pearson said.  

Pearson, who picked up the limb from inside the animal’s enclosure, said when she looked at the girl’s arm there were no bite marks.  

Two-year-old Sophia Scraver (pictured) lost her arm while reaching for the collar of a wolf-dog hybrid at her grandmother’s sanctuary in Michigan

Brenda Pearson founded the Howling Timbers animal sanctuary (dogs pictured at the sanctuary) in West Bloomfield, Michigan, where Sophia lost a portion of her arm

Brenda Pearson founded the Howling Timbers animal sanctuary (dogs pictured at the sanctuary) in West Bloomfield, Michigan, where Sophia lost a portion of her arm 

Initial reports indicated that the animal had attacked the little girl but Pearson explained to DailyMail.com that she doesn't think the animal attacked Sophia. Dogs from the sanctuary are pictured

Initial reports indicated that the animal had attacked the little girl but Pearson explained to DailyMail.com that she doesn’t think the animal attacked Sophia. Dogs from the sanctuary are pictured 

Pearson also said that it’s unclear how exactly the arm was severed. 

In addition to her comments to DailyMail.com, Pearson wrote in a Facebook post: ‘We believe she grabbed his collar and he pulled to get away. She then got her arm stuck in the fence at the elbow and lost her arm.’ 

Pearson also told DailyMail.com that she spoke to an investigator from Child Protective Services who told her that he didn’t see any bite wounds on the child.

According to Pearson, when Sophia was rushed to the hospital, doctors did not attempt to reattach her arm. 

After the incident, a friend of the family started a GoFundMe to raise money with hopes of securing Sophia a prosthetic arm.

According to the GoFundMe, despite losing part of her arm, Sophia still smiling and ‘is doing well’.

However, the toddler still has a long road to recovery ahead of her and her family still needs money to ‘help cover medical expenses as well as any expenses towards a future prosthetic for her’.   

Pearson (right) also told DailyMail.com that she spoke to an investigator from Child Protective Services who told her that he didn't see any bite wounds on the child

Pearson (right) also told DailyMail.com that she spoke to an investigator from Child Protective Services who told her that he didn’t see any bite wounds on the child

'We believe she grabbed his collar and he pulled to get away. She then got her arm stuck in the fence at the elbow and lost her arm,' Pearson wrote in a Facebook post

‘We believe she grabbed his collar and he pulled to get away. She then got her arm stuck in the fence at the elbow and lost her arm,’ Pearson wrote in a Facebook post 

Following the incident, Michigan state authorities said that Pearson’s facility was unlicensed. 

But Pearson told the DailyMail.com that officials from Michigan’s Department of Natural Resources removed three coyotes that the sanctuary ‘had legally under our wildlife rehabilitation permit’ along with six domestic-bred foxes.       

In a Facebook post shared Sunday, Pearson said that she was following all of the guidelines at the time of the incident.

‘Here is a copy of our USDA application and the email address I mailed it to as instructed on 8/28/20. After 6 weeks, they still haven’t contacted us to set up an inspection,’ the post from Howling Timbers reads. 

‘There was another application submitted and inspection done much earlier. Things were completed to standards, wolfdogs ate or destroyed some of those things (typical), so after we had refinished them the 90 days had lapsed and the process needed to be restarted,’ the post says. 

Pearson, who collects the wolf-dogs from across the US, said the dog will not be euthanized.  

She also said she has been cleared of any criminal wrongdoing.



Source link