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Democratic Representatives Push for Third Stimulus Check to be $ 2,000, Not $ 1,400 | The State

Representative Rashida Tlaib, from the most Democratic wing of the Party, is guaranteeing minimum checks of $ 2,000 as part of a third round.

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Chip Somodevilla / Getty Images

Not only the Democratic Rep for New York, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, considers that if a third stimulus check, the base amount must be $ 2,000 and not $ 1,400.

The Missouri Democratic Rep. Cori Bush, also joined the previous call.

“$ 1,400 ≠ $ 2,000 ($ 1,400 is not equal to $ 2,000),” reads a tweet on the legislator’s account this Thursday.

AOC said for its part: “$ 2,000 means $ 2,000. $ 2,000 does not mean $ 1,400 ”.

Along the same lines, his colleague from Michigan expressed himself, Rashida Tlaib.

”$ 1400 <$ 2000 ($ 1,400 is less than $ 2,000) Math teachers know this. The $ 600 is already in the wallets of landlords and debt collectors. Stop compromising the working class and our most vulnerable neighbors, ”reads a message shared yesterday on his Twitter.

Ocasio-Cortez and Tlaib filed an amendment last month following a last-minute call from outgoing President Donald Trump to increase the second stimulus check from $ 600 to $ 2,000.

The appeal did not go beyond a proposal.

Eventually, the representatives of the more progressive wing of the Democratic Party voted in favor of the independent measure presented in the House to raise the amount. However, the measure did not pass the Senate, with a Republican majority.

Bernie Sanders agrees … for now

For his part, the senator Bernie sandersA staunch defender of $ 2,000 checks, he has lowered his tone in recent days to support the bailout and economic recovery plan announced by Biden for the additional $ 1,400.

The independent lawmaker, who in May with Kamala Harris introduced a measure for monthly checks of $ 2,000, called the president-elect’s ideas for new stimulus legislation a good and serious start.

“We are going to have to carefully examine the details, but it is a very good start to address the crisis due to the pandemic and the economic crisis that we are facing now,” Sanders said on The Late Show With Stephen Colbert while highlighting the initiative. to expand the production and distribution of vaccines against the disease.

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Nancy Pelosi says she wants Donald Trump impeached to stop him running for president again

Democrats will proceed with the impeachment of ‘deranged, unhinged and dangerous’ Donald Trump this week unless Mike Pence uses the 25th Amendment to force him from office, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Sunday night. 

Pelosi made the announcement in a letter to colleagues, framing it as an ultimatum to Pence to invoke the powers of the 25th Amendment to remove Trump from office. 

If not, she said, the House would proceed with impeachment. 

Trump could become the only president to be impeached twice.

‘In protecting our Constitution and our Democracy, we will act with urgency, because this President represents an imminent threat to both,’ she said, and added: ‘The horror of the ongoing assault on our democracy perpetrated by this President is intensified and so is the immediate need for action.’

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told 60 Minutes on Sunday that she wants impeachment for Donald Trump so he can’t run for office in the future 

Pelosi wrote to her Democrat colleagues on Sunday night to explain the next steps

Pelosi wrote to her Democrat colleagues on Sunday night to explain the next steps

Pelosi said she would prefer if Vice President Mike Pence invoked the 25th Amendment 'because it gets rid of him – he's out of office' now as concerns mount that Trump could pardon the mob in his last 10 days in office

Pelosi said she would prefer if Vice President Mike Pence invoked the 25th Amendment ‘because it gets rid of him – he’s out of office’ now as concerns mount that Trump could pardon the mob in his last 10 days in office

She, and other Democrats, further fear the president could pardon those involved in the storming of the Capitol in his final days. 

Pelosi’s plan seeks a vote on Monday on a resolution calling on Pence and Cabinet officials to invoke the 25th Amendment. Under rules when the full House is not convened, any objection would reject the resolution. 

Pelosi would then put the resolution before the full House on Tuesday. 

If it were to pass, Pence and the Cabinet would have 24 hours to act before the House would move toward impeachment.

With impeachment planning intensifying, two Republican senators said they want Trump to resign immediately as efforts mounted to prevent Trump from ever again holding elective office in the wake of deadly riots at the Capitol.

House Democrats were expected to introduce articles of impeachment on Monday. The strategy would be to condemn the president’s actions swiftly but delay an impeachment trial in the Senate for 100 days. That would allow President-elect Joe Biden to focus on other priorities as soon as he is inaugurated on January 20. 

Jim Clyburn, the third-ranking House Democrat and a top Biden ally, laid out the ideas on Sunday as the country came to grips with the siege at the Capitol by Trump loyalists trying to overturn the election results.

‘Let’s give President-elect Biden the 100 days he needs to get his agenda off and running,’ Clyburn said.

Pressure was mounting for Trump to leave office even before his term ended amid alarming concerns of more unrest ahead of the inauguration. 

A protester, who has since been identified, is pictured carrying Pelosi's lectern through the Capitol

Another protester is seen hanging from the balcony in the Senate chamber on Wednesday

Lawmakers and law enforcement are pursuing all available avenues to find and prosecute those involved in the Capitol riot – using picture and video evidence to do so

The president whipped up the mob that stormed the Capitol, sent lawmakers into hiding and left five dead.

Senator Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania on Sunday joined his fellow Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska in calling for Trump to ‘resign and go away as soon as possible.’

‘I think the president has disqualified himself from ever, certainly, serving in office again,’ Toomey said. ‘I don’t think he is electable in any way.’

Murkowski, who has long voiced her exasperation with Trump’s conduct in office, told the Anchorage Daily News on Friday that Trump simply ‘needs to get out.’ 

A third Republican, Sen. Roy Blunt, of Missouri, did not go that far, but on Sunday he warned Trump to be ‘very careful’ in his final days in office.

Corporate America began to tie its reaction to the Capitol riots by tying them to campaign contributions.

Blue Cross Blue Shield Association’s CEO and President Kim Keck said it will not contribute to those lawmakers — all Republicans — who supported challenges to Biden’s Electoral College win. 

The group ‘will suspend contributions to those lawmakers who voted to undermine our democracy,’ Kim said.

Citigroup did not single out lawmakers aligned with Trump’s effort to overturn the election, but said it would be pausing all federal political donations for the first three months of the year. Citi’s head of global government affairs, Candi Wolff, said in a Friday memo to employees, ‘We want you to be assured that we will not support candidates who do not respect the rule of law.’

Lisa Murkowski, senator for Alaska, has said she is considering quitting the Republicans

Lisa Murkowski, senator for Alaska, has said she is considering quitting the Republicans

Murkowski said that Trump should resign, saying he had done enough damage

Murkowski said that Trump should resign, saying he had done enough damage

The mob overran the Capitol Police shortly after Trump urged them to 'fight' on his behalf

The mob overran the Capitol Police shortly after Trump urged them to ‘fight’ on his behalf

Trump supporters, egged on by the president himself, stormed the Capitol on Wednesday

Trump supporters, egged on by the president himself, stormed the Capitol on Wednesday

House leaders, furious after the insurrection, appear determined to act against Trump despite the short timeline. 

Mike Pence ‘has not ruled out the 25th Amendment’ 

Mike Pence and Donald Trump have not spoken since Wednesday’s uprising, CNN reported, during which pro-Trump rioters charged through the Senate looking for Pence and threatening to ‘hang’ him.

Trump was angered by Pence telling him he was not constitutionally able to overturn the election, and lashed out at his vice president on Wednesday, telling supporters: ‘Mike Pence has to come through for us. If he doesn’t that will be a sad day for our country.’ He later tweeted: ‘Mike Pence didn’t have the courage to do what should have been done to protect our Country and our Constitution.’

Pence has finally ‘gotten a glimpse of POTUS’s vindictiveness,’ one source told CNN.

It is the first time the normally-loyal Pence has publicly broken with the president.

CNN said that Pence has not ruled out the 25th Amendment. 

Invoking the 25th Amendment would require Pence and a majority of the Cabinet to vote to remove Trump from office due to his inability to ‘discharge the powers and duties of his office’ – an unprecedented step. 

On Thursday, sources close to the VP said it was ‘highly unlikely’ Pence would attempt to invoke the 25th Amendment. He has not ruled it out, however.

Mitch McConnell, the Senate Majority Leader, has said an impeachment trial could not begin under the current calendar before Inauguration Day.

While many have criticized Trump, Republicans have said that impeachment would be divisive in a time of unity.

Senator Marco Rubio said that instead of coming together, Democrats want to ‘talk about ridiculous things like ‘Let’s impeach a president’ with just days left in office.

Still, some Republicans might be supportive.

Nebraska Sen. Ben Sasse said he would take a look at any articles that the House sent over. Illinois Rep. Adam Kinzinger, a frequent Trump critic, said he would ‘vote the right way’ if the matter were put in front of him.

The Democratic effort to stamp Trump’s presidential record — for the second time — with the indelible mark of impeachment had advanced rapidly since the riot.

Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I, a leader of the House effort to draft impeachment articles accusing Trump of inciting insurrection, said Sunday that his group had 200-plus co-sponsors.

The articles, if passed by the House, could then be transmitted to the Senate for a trial, with senators acting as jurors to acquit or convict Trump. 

If convicted, Trump would be removed from office and succeeded by the vice president. 

It would be the first time a U.S. president had been impeached twice.

Potentially complicating Pelosi’s decision about impeachment was what it meant for Biden and the beginning of his presidency. While reiterating that he had long viewed Trump as unfit for office, Biden on Friday sidestepped a question about impeachment, saying what Congress did ‘is for them to decide.’  

While some Democrats are pushing for the impeachment route, the House Speaker told ’60 Minutes’ in an interview that will air Sunday night that she prefers invoking the 25th Amendment because it gets Trump out of office immediately.

‘There is a possibility that after all of this, there’s no punishment, no consequence, and he could run again for president,’ CBS’ Lesley Stahl said to Pelosi in a clip released ahead of airing the full interview.

‘And that’s one of the motivations that people have for advocating for impeachment,’ Pelosi explained.

She is, however, concerned that if Trump is not booted from the White House right now, he will use his last 10 days in office to pardon those part of the mob who descended on the Capitol Wednesday – or even himself and other allies. 

‘I like the 25th Amendment because it gets rid of him – he’s out of office,’ Pelosi said. ‘But there is strong support in the Congress for impeaching the president a second time.’

‘What if he pardons himself?’ Stahl asked.

‘What if pardons these people who are terrorists on the Capitol?’ Pelosi shot back.

Congress is moving to prosecute or punish any and all they can find who were involved in the riots at the Capitol – and have already found some who were pictured prominently.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Sunday in an interview with ABC’s ‘This Week’ that half of the members of the House were at risk of dying during the riots.

'Perhaps my colleagues were not fully present for the events on Wednesday, but we came close to half of the House nearly dying on Wednesday,' Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Sunday of the pro-Trump mob descending on the Capitol

‘Perhaps my colleagues were not fully present for the events on Wednesday, but we came close to half of the House nearly dying on Wednesday,’ Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said Sunday of the pro-Trump mob descending on the Capitol

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said Sunday that Democrats will vote on impeachment this week, but said the party might wait until after Joe Biden's first 100 days in office to move the articles to the Senate

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said Sunday that Democrats will vote on impeachment this week, but said the party might wait until after Joe Biden’s first 100 days in office to move the articles to the Senate

WHAT DOES THE 25TH AMENDMENT SAY? CAN TRUMP’S CABINET REALLY TOPPLE HIM?

The 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution deals with presidential authority in the event of death or removal from office, and was ratified in 1967, in the wake of John F Kennedy’s assassination.

What does the 25th Amendment say?

It is in four sections, all dealing with the president leaving office during his or her elected term. 

The first section states that the vice president takes over the Oval Office if the president dies or resigns – or is removed – something which the original Constitution did not clearly state.

Presidents of course can be removed by impeachment, a feature of the constitution from the start. They can also be removed through the 25th Amendment – of which more below.

Section II states that if the vice president dies, or resigns – or is fired – both the House and Senate have to confirm a new vice president. Until 1967, presidents could change vice presidents mid-term on their own if they got the vice president to agree to resign – not something that actually happened, but which was possible in principle.

Section III makes clear that a president can temporarily delegate his powers to the vice president, and later reclaim them when he – or she – is capable of serving. This is most often invoked if a president is under the influence of surgical anesthetic for a short period of time. 

Section IV is the amendment’s most controversial part: it describes how the president can be removed from office if he is incapacitated and does not leave on his own.

The vice president and ‘a majority of either the principal officers of the executive departments or of such other body as Congress may by law provide’ must write to both the president pro tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House, saying that ‘the President is unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.’

The term principal officers of the executive departments would normally mean the cabinet secretaries.

So at least eight of the president’s 15 most senior Cabinet members together with the vice president must agree that a president should be removed before any plan can move forward.

Notifying the House Speaker and the Senate president pro tempore is the act that immediately elevates the vice president to an ‘acting president’ role.

The deposed president can contest the claim, giving the leaders of the bloodless coup four days to re-assert their claims to the House and Senate. 

Congress then has two days to convene – unless it is already in session – and another 21 days to vote on whether the president is incapable of serving. A two-thirds majority in both houses is required to make that determination.

As soon as there is a vote with a two-thirds majority, the president loses his powers and is removed, and the vice president stops acting and is sworn in as president.

But if 21 days of debate and votes ends without a two-thirds majority, the president gets back his powers.

What could happen to trigger the 25th Amendment?

Vice President Mike Pence and eight of the 15 ‘principal’ Cabinet members would have to agree to notify Congress that President Donald Trump was incapable of running the country.

That group is made up of the Secretary of State, Treasury Secretary, Secretary of Defense, Attorney General, Interior Secretary, Agriculture Secretary, Commerce Secretary, Labor Secretary, Health and Human Services Secretary, Transportation Secretary, Energy Secretary , Education Secretary, Veterans Affairs Secretary and Homeland Security Secretary.

Their formal notification would go to the House Speaker and, in the senate, to the ‘president pro tempore’, the Senate’s most senior member. As soon as the letter is sent, Pence would become ‘acting president.’

Alternatively, Congress could set up its own mechanism to decide if he is fit for office – maybe a commission, or a joint committee. Pence would still have to agree with its conclusion and then write formally to the Speaker and president pro tempore.

Or another possibility is that the pool of ‘principal officers’ is considered to be bigger than the 15 and a majority of that group call Trump incapable.

What if Trump does not agree?

If Trump claims he is capable of holding office, he would write to the House Speaker and the president pro tempore of the Senate within four days, setting up three weeks of intense debate in both houses of Congress.

Trump would be removed from office if both two-thirds majorities in both the House and Senate agreed with Pence and his cabal. 

If either of both chambers fell short of that mark, Trump would retain his powers and likely embark on a wholesale housecleaning, firing Pence and replacing disloyal Cabinet members.

Are there any loopholes?

The 25th Amendment allows Congress to appoint its own panel to evaluate the president instead of relying on the Cabinet – the men and women who work most closely with Trump – to decide on  a course of action.

It specifies that some ‘other body as Congress may by law provide’ could play that role, but Pence would still need to agree with any finding that the president is incapable of discharging his duties.

That commission could hypothetically include anyone from presidential historians to psychiatrists, entrusted to assess the president’s fitness for office. 

Another loophole is that it does not spell out that the Cabinet is needed to agree, but says that the ‘principal officers’ of the departments are needed. That term is undefined in the constitution. In some departments legislation appears to name not just the secretary but deputies and even undersecretaries as ‘principal officers’, so many more people could be called in to the assessment of Trump’s fitness. 

But Trump’s cabinet has a swathe of ‘acting’ cabinet officer – and it is unclear if they could therefore take part in removing him. 

Could Trump fire Pence if he rebelled?

Yes, in principle.  If Trump smelled a whiff of trouble – if Pence and a cabal of Cabinet members, or Pence and a panel assembled by Congress seemed ready to judge him incapacitated – he could dismiss his vice president with the stroke of a pen to stop the process.

But installing a more loyal VP could be problematic since the 25th Amendment includes its own poison pill: Both houses of Congress must vote to approve a new vice president.

That means Trump would find himself up against the same Congress that would vote on his fitness for office, unless the process were to unfold in the weeks before a new Congress.

Theoretically, a Democratic-controlled Congress could make life dramatically more difficult for the president if it came into power in the midst of the constitutional crisis. 

One scenario has appeared to stump presidential historians, however: Firing Pence before the process is underway, and then leaving the vice presidency vacant, would give Congress no practical way forward. That would present its own constitutional crisis.

Is there any precedent for this?

No.  Only Section III, the voluntary surrender of presidential powers, has ever been used – and only very briefly.

In December 1978, President Jimmy Carter thought about invoking Section III when he was contemplating a surgical procedure to remove hemorrhoids. 

Presidents Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush both voluntarily relinquished their powers while undergoing procedures under anesthetic. 

Section IV has also never been invoked, although there have been claims that Ronald Reagan’s chief of staff Donald Regan told his successor, Howard Baker,  in 1987 that he should be prepared to invoke it because Reagan was inattentive and inept.

The PBS documentary ‘American Experience’ recounts how Baker and his team watched Reagan closely for signs of incapacity during their first meeting and decided he was in perfect command of himself.  

‘If another head of state came in and ordered an attack on the United States Congress, would we say that that should not be prosecuted? Would we say that there should be absolutely no response to that?’ the New York congresswoman told ABC host George Stephanopoulos.

‘No,’ Ocasio-Cortez asserted. ‘It is an act of insurrection. It’s an act of hostility. And we must have accountability, because, without it, it will happen again.

‘Perhaps my colleagues were not fully present for the events on Wednesday, but we came close to half of the House nearly dying on Wednesday,’ she said.

Hakeem Jeffries, a fellow New York Representative, agreed with AOC’s points in an interview with NBC on Sunday, claiming: ‘Donald Trump represents a clear and present danger to the health and safety of the American people, as well as our democracy’ 

The representative, as well as the handful of members of her progressive ‘squad’, are fully on board with plans to again impeach President Trump.

Clyburn said Sunday that articles have already been drawn and he is expecting a vote in the lower chamber in the coming day. 

‘I think that will come – probably Tuesday, and maybe Wednesday, but it will happen this week,’ the No. 3 House Democrat told ‘Fox News Sunday’ when asked about the House taking action to impeach Trump. ‘The rest of the articles have been drawn up.’

‘If we are the people’s House, let’s do the people’s work and vote to impeach this president,’ Clyburn continued in his interview with Fox’s Chris Wallace. ‘And then we’ll decide later — or the Senate will decide later — what to do with that impeachment.’

Ocasio-Cortez said ‘every minute’ Trump is still in office, there is a looming threat.

‘I absolutely believe that impeachment should be scheduled for several reasons,’ she said on Sunday.

‘Our main priority is to ensure the removal of Donald Trump as president of the United States,’ AOC added. ‘Every minute and every hour that he is in office represents a clear and present danger, not just to the United States Congress, but, frankly, to the country.’

While Democrats pursue impeachment, many lawmakers from both sides of the aisle are calling for Trump to step down on his own volition to prevent Congress from having to intervene.

Lawmakers were forced to evacuate the House and Senate chambers and shelter in offices or other locations on Wednesday after thousands of Donald Trump's supporters breached the Capitol and rioted through the halls

Lawmakers were forced to evacuate the House and Senate chambers and shelter in offices or other locations on Wednesday after thousands of Donald Trump’s supporters breached the Capitol and rioted through the halls

There are also talks of banning Trump from running for president again in the future – as speculation mounts he will pursue another run for the White House in 2024.

‘In addition to removal, we’re also talking about complete barring of the president – or, rather, of Donald Trump from running for office ever again,’ Ocasio-Cortez told ABC. 

‘And, in addition to that, the potential ability to prevent pardoning himself from those charges that he was impeached for.’

Jeffries also wants immediate action against Trump, expressing concern that the president still has ‘access to the nuclear codes.’

‘The goal at the present moment is to address the existential threat that Donald Trump presents at this time. Every second, every minute, every hour that Donald Trump remains in office presents a danger to the American people,’ the Democrat representative said on Sunday during an interview on ‘Meet the Press’.

‘You know, Donald Trump may be in the Twitter penalty box, but he still has access to the nuclear codes,’ Jeffries said, referencing Trump’s indefinite ban from Twitter. 

‘That’s a frightening prospect.’

He added: ‘Donald Trump is completely and totally out of control, and even his longtime enablers have now come to that conclusion.’

Clyburn, however, said Sunday that House Democrats are weighing if they should hold off on sending the articles of impeachment to the Senate until after Joe Biden’s first 100 days in office.

This way, Democrats would allow the new president to install key members of his team and would have a new 50-50 split Senate to work with.

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AOC says she feared for her life as Trump supporters stormed the Capitol during MAGA riots

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says she feared for her life during the riots on the Capitol building on Wednesday which saw Trump supporters storm the building and five people lose their lives. 

The New York representative revealed to ABC 7 how she was not alone in fearing she might die as protesters managed to enter the congressional building, stating many of those inside were ‘prepared for the possibility of losing our lives’.  

Trump urged his fans to descend on Washington DC on Wednesday as Congress formally approved President-elect Joe Biden’s victory. 

The Congresswoman is one of many calling for the President to be impeached as she warned Trump’s ‘mental status and his actions are wildly eroding at a rapid pace’. 

Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said she feared for her life during the riots on the Capitol building on Wednesday. Pictured: AOC bows her head during a closing prayer of a joint session of the House and Senate to confirm Electoral College votes at the Capitol, early Thursday

AOC said representatives had been assured security was in place to protect politicians as intelligence revealed protesters planned to march close to the government building.  

Speaking on Thursday, she explained how she and those around her felt as they cowered out of sight or fled when rioters made it inside. 

‘It was extremely worrying. I don’t think it is an exaggeration by any means to say that many of us thought and were prepared for the possibility of us losing our lives yesterday,’ she said.

‘I certainly was thinking that was a possibility and I know many members thought that was a possibility as well.’ 

Members of congress run for cover as protesters try to enter the House Chamber

Members of congress run for cover as protesters try to enter the House Chamber

Capitol police officers point their guns at a door that was vandalized in the House Chamber during a joint session of Congress

Capitol police officers point their guns at a door that was vandalized in the House Chamber during a joint session of Congress

Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden's victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud

Trump supporters gather outside the Capitol, Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington. As Congress prepares to affirm President-elect Joe Biden’s victory, thousands of people have gathered to show their support for President Donald Trump and his claims of election fraud

She also revealed that many political figures had made inquiries into planned security measures for Wednesday.

‘We were told that rioters would not find their way even onto the Capitol Plaza, let alone anywhere near the building,’ she said.

The Congresswoman said the security breaches were ‘extremely serious’ and should be individually investigated.  

AOC’s words came after White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany delivered a statement the day after the riots, which the Congresswoman said did not accept Trump was responsible for ‘incitement of that crowd’. 

She is now part of a large group of Congressional representatives who are calling for Trump to be impeached, claiming every day Trump is in office is ‘clear and present danger’ to US democracy.

The two top Democrats in Congress, Sen. Charles Schumer and Speaker Nancy Pelosi, reached out directly to Vice President Mike Pence on Thursday to try to push him to act immediately to remove President Trump from office, only to be rebuffed.

Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they storm the US Capitol in Washington, DC on January 6, 2021

Trump supporters clash with police and security forces as they storm the US Capitol in Washington, DC on January 6, 2021

The two leaders called Pence hours after he had overseen a Joint Session of Congress to count the electoral votes to make Joe Biden the next president, despite intense pressure by President Trump that Pence move against it.

Late Thursday sources told CNN that Trump’s mental state was deteriorating and he was ‘ranting’ and ‘raving’ as he watched the 25th Amendment being discussed on television – with Pelosi and Schumer’s demand being played repeatedly.

But if they had hopes that Pence might join in a speedy potential effort to seize the reins of power from a volatile Trump in his final days in office, the reception they got may provide an answer.

‘Speaker Pelosi and I tried to call the vice president this morning to tell him to do this,’ Schumer told reporters in New York Thursday. ‘They kept us on hold for 25 minutes and then said the Vice President wouldn’t come on the phone.’

‘So we are making this call public because he should do it and do it right away,’ Schumer said, explaining why both he and Pelosi are calling on Pence and the Trump cabinet to invoke the 25th Amendment to declare Trump unfit and install Pence as president in an acting capacity. 

Protesters made it into US Senate Chamber as Congress held a joint session to ratify President-elect Joe Biden's 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump

Protesters made it into US Senate Chamber as Congress held a joint session to ratify President-elect Joe Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College win over President Donald Trump

Pro-Trump protesters storm into the U.S. Capitol during clashes with police during the rally in Washington DC

Pro-Trump protesters storm into the U.S. Capitol during clashes with police during the rally in Washington DC

Wednesday’s ordinarily mundane procedure of Congress certifying a new president was always going to be extraordinary, with Trump supporters vowing to protest over the results of an election that they have baselessly insisted was reversed by fraud. 

In a raucous, out-of-control scene, protesters fought past police and breached the building, shouting and waving Trump and American flags as they marched through the halls.

The attack forced politicians to rush from the building and interrupted challenges to Biden’s Electoral College victory.

Senators were evacuated. Some House politicians tweeted they were sheltering in place in their offices. 

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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez shoots Republicans on Twitter for not endorsing $ 2,000 stimulus check | The State

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Photo:
Rick Loomis / Getty Images

Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez He met Republican Kevin Brady with a sarcastic tweet in which he questions his political rival’s arguments for refusing to endorse minimum stimulus checks of $ 2,000.

Brady said in the plenary session of the House that he does not approve the increase from $ 600 to $ 2,000 dollars, since in his opinion, the money will be used for the payment of credit card debts and “new online purchases in Walmart, Best Buy, or Amazon”.

The Republican also argued that the majority of rescue funds should go to small and medium business owners.

Ocasio-Cortez, from the most progressive wing of the Party, attacked Brady in a very subtle way in tweets on his official account this Monday in which he pointed to the Administration that Brady represents as responsible for the economic crisis.

“‘ I do not support survivor checks of $ 2,000 because it will help people get out of the debt that the inaction of our Government helped create and kept them immersed in the first place, ‘”reads the AOC message.

In another post, Ocasio-Cortez states: “Look at how Republicans in Congress who say they are the ‘Personal Responsibility’ Party refuse to take responsibility for blocking retroactive unemployment benefits, vote against the $ 2,000 checks from survival, fueling doubt about the pandemic to begin with, etc. ”.

The House of Representatives on Monday passed expedited legislation to increase stimulus checks from $ 600 to $ 2,000 after Trump placed the request last week when the new stimulus plan had already been approved in Congress.

Although Trump ended up signing the law that provides for minimum checks of $ 600, he continued the summons for the figure to be increased.
Ironically, it is the Republicans in the Senate led by Majority Speaker Mitch McConnell who are now obstructing the president’s own intentions to increase the amount. The expectation is that members of the same community that Trump is a part of block the measure approved in the House.

In an unexpected move, Senator Bernie Sanders sided with Trump in this debate threatening to delay the vote to override the veto of the president of the National Defense Authorization Law if Senate Majority Speaker Mitch McConnell does not take action to expand direct payments, so the discussion over $ 2,000 checks could be extended further.

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Incoming ‘squad’ members Cori Bush, Jamaal Bowman won’t say if they’ll vote for Pelosi as speaker

Two representatives-elect who have been embraced by the ‘squad’ wouldn’t say whether they will vote for Nancy Pelosi’s reelection as House Speaker in two years after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said the Democratic Party needs new, more progressive leadership.

Both incoming Democratic representatives Cori Bush of Missouri’s 1st congressional district and Jamaal Bowman of New York’s 16th district said they are more focused on the recent coronavirus relief, which they say should include bigger direct checks for struggling Americans.

‘What I’m going to do is make sure that the voices of the people of Saint Louis are heard and that we have what we need. And so you will find out then,’ Bush told CNN when asked Sunday morning if she would vote for Pelosi’s reelection.

‘That’s not a yes,’ Dana Bash, who filled in for ‘State of the Union’ host Jake Tapper this weekend, said.

‘I’m working with my community,’ Bush responded – still not answering the question.

Bowman was just as noncommittal about which way he will vote once it comes time for Democratic caucus leadership elections.

‘So, you will find out when my vote is tallied,’ Bowman said. ‘And, again, organizing with our community to figure out what’s best.’

Representatives-elect Cori Bush (right) and Jamaal Bowman (left) refused to say if they would vote for Nancy Pelosi as House Speaker in two years – claiming they are more focused on the recent coronavirus relief

The comments came after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said earlier this month that the Democratic Party needs new, more progressive leadership

The comments came after Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said earlier this month that the Democratic Party needs new, more progressive leadership

Pelosi easily won reelection for her long-held leadership position – running unopposed for the speakership.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer also ran unopposed and sailed to reelection.

New York Representative Ocasio-Cortez, the unofficial leader of the ‘squad’ and self-proclaimed Democrtic socialist, suggested earlier this month she would not support Pelosi if she ran again. She claimed it’s time for new, more progressive leadership for the Democratic Party.

The 31-year-old New York representative admitted at the time that even if Pelosi, 80, and Schumer, 70, were to go, the progressive wing of the party has no plan on who would fill those vacancies. She said she can’t be the one to take on a bigger role right now.

Ocasio-Cortez said the replacement for Pelosi and Schumer could end up being worse and ‘even more conservative’ than the current Democratic leaders.

‘How do we fill that vacuum? Because if you create that vacuum, there are so many nefarious forces at play to fill that vacuum with something even worse,’ Ocasio-Cortez told The Intercept podcast ‘Intercepted’ on December 16.

‘And so, the actual sad state of affairs is that there are folks more conservative than even they are willing to kind of fill that void,’ she said.

‘The House is extraordinarily complex and I’m not ready,’ Ocasio-Cortez said when it was suggested she could take a leadership position in two years. ‘It can’t be me. I know that I couldn’t do that job.’

Bowman and Bush both said during their interview Sunday that Donald Trump needs to sign the latest bipartisan coronavirus relief legislation, which was overwhelmingly passed by Congress on Tuesday and passed off to the president for his signature.

‘The American people need relief right now,’ Bowman said when Bash asked him if it was OK for Pelosi to accept a deal that included $600 checks for Americans.

Trump suggested he would veto the legislation if payments were not tripled to $2,000 checks.

Donald Trump has suggested he will veto the $900 billion coroanvirus relief package, insisting the $600 direct checks for Americans should be tripled to $2,000 – a plan embraced by Democrats and snubbed by Republicans

Donald Trump has suggested he will veto the $900 billion coroanvirus relief package, insisting the $600 direct checks for Americans should be tripled to $2,000 – a plan embraced by Democrats and snubbed by Republicans 

Democrats were quick to jump on board with claiming they could pass a separate bill increasing payments, but are pushing for the president to sign the sweeping legislation currently sitting on his desk to deliver relief immediately and avoid a government shutdown.

‘So, this bill was what we were able to come up with at this moment,’ Bowman said. ‘But we need to go right back to the table to give people more in terms of relief.’

‘The president is the embodiment of everything that’s wrong with this country,’ the incoming lawmaker said. ‘He’s a privileged person who rose to power as a reality TV star. And now he’s trying to drive this country into chaos. I can’t wait for him to be out of office’

Pelosi, along with the rest of congressional leadership, vowed not to leave Capitol Hill for holiday recess until a deal was reached on the $900 billion COVID-19 relief package.

They spent the days leading up to the holiday staying in Washington D.C. to negotiate after nine months of deadlock. 

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Strange bedfellows! The ‘Squad’ backs Trump’s demand for $2,000 stimulus relief checks

President Trump and the ultra-progressive ‘Squad’ have little in common, but they all agree on giving Americans $2,000 stimulus checks, proving that politics does indeed make strange bedfellows.

The foursome of Democratic lawmakers that includes House Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Ilhan Omar, and Ayanna Pressley joined fellow progressive House Rep. Pramila Jayapal to introduce a bill that would more than triple the relief checks approved in Congress’ latest stimulus bill.

The move comes after Trump said he would support a bill from Congress that would boost the stimulus checks in the most recent bill approved by both chambers from $600 to $2,000.

The president on Friday doubled down on his demand to Congress to increase payments from $600 to $2,000 in the spending and COVID-19 stimulus bill that lawmakers already sent to the president’s desk.  

‘Made many calls and had meetings at Trump International in Palm Beach, Florida,’ the president tweeted after being spotted with Senator Lindsey Graham heading to his golf club on Christmas morning. 

‘Why would politicians not want to give people $2000, rather than only $600? It wasn’t their fault, it was China. Give our people the money!’ 

Earlier, Politico’s Playbook reported that the president was complaining that the giant package had too much ‘pork.’   

Trump’s stance is at odds with fellow Republicans in Congress who prevented House Speaker Nancy Pelosi from convening the lower chamber on Thursday and amending the legislation by unanimous consent.

The four members of the ‘Squad’ – a group of progressive Democratic lawmakers in the US House of Representatives – found common cause with President Trump as they introduced a bill that would provide $2,000 stimulus checks to every American. From left: House Reps. Rashida Tlaib, Ilhan Omar, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and Ayanna Pressley

The 'Squad' introduced a bill alongside another progressive member of Congress, House Rep. Pramila Jayapal (above) of Washington State

The ‘Squad’ introduced a bill alongside another progressive member of Congress, House Rep. Pramila Jayapal (above) of Washington State

Trump (seen above in a photo posted to his Instagram account on Friday) has threatened to veto a wide-ranging coronavirus relief package that includes stimulus checks totaling $600

Trump (seen above in a photo posted to his Instagram account on Friday) has threatened to veto a wide-ranging coronavirus relief package that includes stimulus checks totaling $600

‘This holiday season, families are being forced to make incredibly difficult decisions, such as whether they should keep their lights on or buy groceries,’ Tlaib, the second-term congresswoman who represents Detroit, said in a statement.

‘Providing $2,000 survival checks would give those struggling right now a lifeline as we continue to fight to defeat COVID-19.

‘It’s time for Trump to stop bluffing and get the members of his party in line so that the government can provide this long-overdue relief to people across the country during this time of great need.’

‘We’ve been fighting all along for robust survival checks to help people meet their most basic needs, and the broad support that has emerged is a testament to the power of the people and the urgency of this moment,’ said Pressley, the Boston congresswoman.

Tlaib released a statement on her Twitter account on Friday calling for the direct payment of $2,000 'survival checks' to Americans

Tlaib released a statement on her Twitter account on Friday calling for the direct payment of $2,000 ‘survival checks’ to Americans

‘Two thousand dollars in direct cash assistance will help families weather the crisis while we continue fighting for additional relief that meets the scale and scope of the hurt so many are feeling.

‘Let’s get it done.’

Trump and the ‘Squad’ have frequently assailed one another over the course of the last two years.

In speeches at campaign rallies, the president has questioned AOC’s intelligence and whether she went to college.

During his appearances before his supporters, Trump has also called into question Omar’s patriotism and loyalty to America in comments that outraged many as racist and xenophobic.

Omar, who is black and Muslim, came to the United States as a refugee from Somalia and settled in the Minneapolis area.

Last year, Trump lashed out at Tlaib and said he didn’t ‘buy her tears’ after the congresswoman and Omar were told they would not be allowed to visit Tlaib’s Palestinian grandmother in the Israeli-occupied West Bank.

Tlaib was later told by the Israeli authorities that she would be allowed to visit her grandmother as long as she promised not to make public comments promoting a boycott of Israel over its occupation of Palestine.

Tlaib and Omar declined to make the trip.

In perhaps the most incendiary attack, Trump last year tweeted a post on Twitter in which he called on the ‘Squad’ members to ‘go back’ to the ‘corrupt’ countries that they came from – even though all except for Omar were born in the United States. 

But the ‘Squad’ now finds itself in a rare point of agreement with the president.

A similar piece of legislation was introduced by another Democrat, House Rep. Richard Neal of Massachusetts.

Unlike Neal’s proposal, however, the ‘Squad’s’ bill is a standalone measure that is not tied to any other provision included in the COVID-19 relief package approved by Congress last week.

Neal’s bill would only kick in if all of the other parameters, including government funding and other provisions, are approved.

Trump and the ‘Squad’ have frequently assailed one another over the course of the last two years. In perhaps the most incendiary attack, Trump last year tweeted a post on Twitter in which he called on the 'Squad' members to 'go back' to the 'corrupt' countries that they came from - even though all except for Omar were born in the United States

 Trump and the ‘Squad’ have frequently assailed one another over the course of the last two years. In perhaps the most incendiary attack, Trump last year tweeted a post on Twitter in which he called on the ‘Squad’ members to ‘go back’ to the ‘corrupt’ countries that they came from – even though all except for Omar were born in the United States

 

The full package of legislation was shipped to Trump’s Mar-a-Lago club in Palm Beach, Florida, where the president and his family are spending the Christmas holiday.

Either way, the likelihood that Americans will receive $2,000 checks appears to be low given opposition from Republicans in both chambers.

House Republicans shot down a Democratic bid on Thursday to pass Trump’s longshot, end-of-session demand for $2,000 direct payments to most Americans before signing a long-overdue COVID-19 relief bill.

The made-for-TV clash came as the Democratic-controlled chamber convened for a pro forma session scheduled in anticipation of a smooth Washington landing for the massive, year-end legislative package, which folds together a $1.4trillion governmentwide spending with the hard-fought COVID-19 package and dozens of unrelated but bipartisan bills.

Thursday’s unusual 12-minute House session session instead morphed into unconvincing theater in response to Trump’s veto musings about the package, which was negotiated by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on Trump’s behalf.

House Rep. Steny Hoyer, the No. 2 House Democrat, sought the unanimous approval of all House members to pass the bill, but GOP leader Kevin McCarthy, who was not present in the nearly-empty chamber, denied his approval and the effort fizzled.

If Trump were to follow through on his implied veto threat, delivered via video clip on Tuesday, the government would likely experience a brief, partial shutdown of the government starting on December 29.

It would also delay delivery of the $600 direct payments that the bill does contain.

Senate Republicans, led by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, have opposed larger $2,000 checks as too costly and poorly targeted.

Democrats are supportive of the direct payments and now plan to vote on the $2,000 check proposal on Monday. House Republicans are expected to block the vote, but Democrats may try again Monday.

The president’s last-minute objections are setting up a defining showdown with his own Republican Party in his final days in office.

Rather than take the victory of the sweeping aid package, among the biggest in history, Trump is lashing out at GOP leaders over the presidential election – for acknowledging Joe Biden as president-elect and rebuffing his campaign to dispute the Electoral College results when they are tallied in Congress on January 6.

President Donald Trump (left) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (right) headed to the president's West Palm Beach golf club on Christmas morning as the fate of the massive stimulus and spending bill remains in limbo

President Donald Trump (left) and Sen. Lindsey Graham (right) headed to the president’s West Palm Beach golf club on Christmas morning as the fate of the massive stimulus and spending bill remains in limbo 

Trump doubled down on his demand of Congress to increase the stimulus checks to Americans from $600, which is in the legislation, to $2,000

Trump doubled down on his demand of Congress to increase the stimulus checks to Americans from $600, which is in the legislation, to $2,000 

Trump is captured waving to supporters on his return trip to Mar-a-Lago on Christmas Day

Trump is captured waving to supporters on his return trip to Mar-a-Lago on Christmas Day 

Trump's motorcade is photographed as it leaves Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida for his nearby West Palm Beach golf club. The president also spent part of Christmas Eve on the course

Trump’s motorcade is photographed as it leaves Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Florida for his nearby West Palm Beach golf club. The president also spent part of Christmas Eve on the course 

The president's motorcade drove Trump and Graham to the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida Friday morning

The president’s motorcade drove Trump and Graham to the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida Friday morning 

The president’s push to increase direct payments for most Americans from $600 to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples splits the party with a politically painful loyalty test, including for GOP senators David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler, fighting to retain their seats in the January 5 special election in Georgia.

Republican lawmakers traditionally balk at big spending and many never fully embraced Trump’s populist approach. Their political DNA tells them to oppose a costlier relief package.

But now they’re being asked to stand with the president.

On a conference call Wednesday House Republican lawmakers complained that Trump threw them under the bus, according to one Republican on the private call and granted anonymity to discuss it.

Most had voted for the package and they urged leaders to hit the cable news shows to explain its benefits, the person said.

Democrats were taking advantage of the Republican disarray to apply pressure for a priority. Jon Ossoff, Perdue’s Democratic opponent, tweeted simply on Tuesday night: ‘$2,000 checks now.’

The relief bill Trump is criticizing would establish a temporary $300 per week supplemental jobless benefit, along with a new round of subsidies for hard-hit businesses, restaurants and theaters and money for schools, health care providers and renters facing eviction.

Even though Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin represented the White House in negotiations, Trump assailed the bipartisan effort in a video he tweeted out Tuesday night, suggesting he may not sign the legislation.

Railing against a range of provisions in the broader government funding package, including foreign aid mainstays included each year, Trump called the bill a ‘disgrace.’

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy railed against 'billions in foreign aid' in a spending bill he helped negotiate, parroting what Trump had said in the president's Tuesday night video

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy railed against ‘billions in foreign aid’ in a spending bill he helped negotiate, parroting what Trump had said in the president’s Tuesday night video 

Trump did not specifically vow to use his veto power, and there may be enough support in Congress to override him if he does.

But the consequences would be severe if Trump upends the legislation.

It would mean no federal aid to struggling Americans and small businesses, and no additional resources to help with vaccine distribution.

To top it off, because lawmakers linked the pandemic relief bill to an overarching funding measure, the government would shut down on December 29.

The final text of the more than 5,000-page bill was still being prepared by Congress and was not expected to be sent to the White House for Trump’s signature before Thursday or Friday, an aide said.

That complicates the schedule ahead. If Trump vetoes the package, or allows it to expire with a ‘pocket veto’ at the end of the year, Americans will go without massive amounts of COVID aid.

A resolution could be forced Monday. That’s when a stopgap funding bill Congress approved to keep the government funded while the paperwork was being compiled expires, risking a federal shutdown.

Democrats are considering another stopgap measure to at least keep government running until Biden is sworn into office January 20, according to two aides granted anonymity to discuss the private talks.

The House was already set to return Monday, and the Senate Tuesday, for a vote to override Trump’s veto of the must-pass defense bill.

Democrats may try again at that time to pass Trump’s proposal for $2,000 checks, as well as the temporary government funding measure to avert a shutdown, the aides said.

The push for bigger payments to Americans drew rare common cause between Trump and some of the most liberal members of Congress.

Pelosi and Democrats said they fought for the higher stipends during protracted negotiations only to settle on the lower number when Republicans refused.

Republicans have been reluctant to spend more on pandemic relief and only agreed to the big year-end package as time dwindled for a final deal.

Senator Chuck Schumer, the Senate Democratic leader, said that ‘Trump needs to sign the bill to help people and keep the government open,’ and Congress would step up for more aid after.

The Senate cleared the huge relief package by a 92-6 vote after the House approved it by 359-53. Those votes totals would be enough to override a veto should Trump decide to take that step.

Biden applauded lawmakers for their work. He described the package as far from perfect, ‘but it does provide vital relief at a critical time.’

He also said more relief would be needed in the months ahead. 

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Nearly 60% of Americans have an ‘unfavorable opinion’ of AOC

A new survey has revealed that nearly 60 per cent of Americans have an ‘unfavorable opinion’ of Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. 

The Heartland Institute/Rasmussen poll, which surveyed 1,000 participants from December 6-7, found that a vast majority of likely voters prefer a free-market economic system over a socialist economic system.

Ocasio-Cortez, who is one of America’s most prominent socialists, was seen as ‘very unfavorable’ by 38 per cent of the respondents. Another 20 per cent said they have a ‘somewhat unfavorable’ impression of the Democrat. 

Only 18 per cent said they have a ‘very favorable’ view of AOC, while 19 per cent said she is ‘somewhat favorable’. About 15% said they are not sure. 

A new survey has revealed that nearly 60 per cent of Americans have an ‘unfavorable opinion’ of Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

When the respondents were asked if they prefer a free-market economic system or socialism, 75 per cent of participants answered 'free-market economic system'. Only 11 per cent answered 'socialism'.  A woman protests against socialism in Minnesota

When the respondents were asked if they prefer a free-market economic system or socialism, 75 per cent of participants answered ‘free-market economic system’. Only 11 per cent answered ‘socialism’.  A woman protests against socialism in Minnesota 

When the respondents were asked if they prefer a free-market economic system or socialism, 75 per cent of participants answered ‘free-market economic system’.

Only 11 per cent answered ‘socialism’.

Researchers said the results show that a ‘strong majority of likely voters believe the United States should reject socialism and instead adopt free-market economic principles’.  

Chris Talgo, an editor and research fellow at the Heartland Institute, said: ‘Despite the increased calls for socialism by many on the far left, the vast majority of likely voters believe that the United States should embrace a free-market economy. 

‘Only a sliver of likely voters think that the United States should abandon the free-market capitalistic policies that are responsible for making the United States the wealthiest nation in world history.’

Talgo continued: ‘Despite the countless calls for more socialism among elites in media and Hollywood, Americans aren’t interested in adopting the same socialist policies that have led to mass poverty wherever they have been tried.’

While a superstar on the left, Ocasio-Cortez has long ruffled the feathers of moderate Democrats. 

Just last week Ocasio-Cortez lost a race for a seat on the prestigious House Energy and Commerce Committee when colleagues voted overwhelmingly for fellow New York Democratic Rep Kathleen Rice. 

The survey also asked about their thoughts on President-elect Joe Biden. Thirty-six per cent of the respondents said they have a 'very unfavorable impression' of Biden

The survey also asked about their thoughts on President-elect Joe Biden. Thirty-six per cent of the respondents said they have a ‘very unfavorable impression’ of Biden

The two New York Democrats were forced to fight over a final seat on the committee, which oversees big policy areas like climate change and healthcare. 

Moderate Democrats took on AOC prior to the vote after she called for ‘new leadership’ in her party and gotten in a public feud with fellow Democrat, Sen Joe Manchin.  

She was in a weeks-long back-and-forth with Manchin of West Virginia, taking umbrage when he said: ‘She’s more active on Twitter than anything else.’ 

‘I find it amusing when politicians try to diminish the seriousness of our policy work, movement organizing and grassroots fundraising to “she just tweets,” as though “serious” politics is only done by begging corporate CEOs for money through wax-sealed envelopes delivered by raven,’ Ocasio-Cortez shot back.  

During a private meeting of the Steering and Policy Committee – where members secretly voted 46 to 13 in favor of Rice – Democrats called out Ocasio-Cortez for supporting progressive primary challengers over House incumbents, Politico reported.

She also recently suggested there should be new leadership at the top of the caucus, during an appearance on The Intercept’s ‘Intercepted’ podcast. 

‘You know, for me personally it was when I was waitressing, and I would hear Democrats talk about why the Affordable Care Act was so amazing all the time and how this is the greatest thing ever, and the economy was doing wonderfully,’ she recalled. ‘And frankly, it is the same trick that Trump pulls, which is, you know, people touting the Dow as a measure of economic success, when we’re all getting killed out here.’ 

‘And so, you know, do we need new leadership of the Democratic Party? Absolutely,’ she said. ‘But how do we ensure that when we shift, we don’t even move further to the right?’    

The survey also asked about their thoughts on President-elect Joe Biden.

Thirty-six per cent of the respondents said they have a ‘very unfavorable impression’ of Biden. 

On the other hand, 32 per cent said they have a ‘very favorable impression’ of the incoming president. 

Nineteen per cent have a ‘somewhat favorable impression’ of Biden, while 11 per cent responded that they have a ‘somewhat unfavorable impression’ of the Democrat. 

Two per cent said they are ‘not sure’. 

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With Call for a $ 2,000 Stimulus Check, Trump Gives Wings to More Progressive Democrats Like Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez | The State

With your call for stimulus checks of $ 2,000, outgoing President Donald Trump assumes not only positions along the Democratic line, but also those promoted by the most progressive legislators of that delegation in the United States Congress.

Trump, who has been a direct critic of the call “Squad” of the House of Representatives, has been located – “without wanting to” -, in the last hours as a supporter of the economic proposals of figures such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Rashida Tlaib, two of the four legislators of the aforementioned bloc in which all are women, young, with immigrant roots and fierce critics of the Trump Administration.

However, the president’s call on Tuesday through a video on Twitter for Congress to increase the minimum amount of money for stimulus checks gave Ocasio-Cortez and Tlaib an advantage, politically speaking.

The duo decided to use Trump’s proposal in their favor by highlighting through tweets that the Republican finally supported the measure that members of the Democratic delegation have promoted for months.

The representatives even introduced an amendment to alter the text already approved in Congress by both houses and include a provision for stimulus checks of $ 2,000 instead of $ 600.

“Let’s do it. @RashidaTlaib and I already co-wrote the COVID bill for $ 2,000 checks, so she’s good to go, ”reads one of Ocasio-Cortez’s messages on Twitter this Tuesday.

“I am glad that the President is willing to support our legislation,” continued Ocasio-Cortez. “We can pass the checks for $ 2,000 this week if Republicans in the Senate agree to end this,” he added.

Bernie Sanders figure

With the move, Trump also approaches the postulates of figures such as Senator Bernie Sanders, who defines himself as a Democratic Socialist.

Sanders has been one of the most vocal characters who in recent days has expressed himself as part of the legislative efforts to promote a minimum check of $ 1,200 dollars.

Along with his colleague, Republican Josh Hawley, Sanders introduced an amendment to the spending law about two weeks ago to add provisions for a second round of $ 1,200 stimulus checks. Instead of the previous figure, at the last minute lawmakers approved minimum direct payments of $ 600, an amount that the White House had previously thrown to Democrats and that Trump now rejects.

Similarly, Sanders also gave the go-ahead to Trump’s offer but not before also summoning the leader of the Republican majority in the Senate, Mitch McConnell.

“This is great. I first introduced the law to provide direct payments of $ 2,000 with Senator @SenKamalaHarris & @EdMarkey 7 months ago. Now, Mr. President, stop Mitch McConnell and his Republican friends from opposing that and we can provide working-class Americans with checks for $ 2,000. Let’s do it! ”, Read a tweet on his account this Tuesday.

Sanders is one of the senators who introduced a bill in May together with the current vice president-elect Kamala Harris to award stimulus checks of $ 2,000 per month. The measure was ruled out in Congress due to the large outlay of money it involved.

17 Progressive Caucus representatives advocated for a $ 2,000 stimulus check

Sanders also endorsed the initiative of 17 members of the House of Representatives Progressive Caucus, who sent a letter to top congressional leaders to include $ 2,000 stimulus checks in the bipartisan package that was being evaluated.

The Democrats, led by the spokeswoman of the majority in the House, Nancy Pelosi, were preparing to approve this Thursday by “unanimous consent” a change in the stimulus law to raise the minimum number of payments to $ 2,000. However, the Republicans in that body did not consent, so larger stimulus checks are not viable at the moment.

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AOC hits back at critics who blasted her for getting the COVID-19 vaccine before others

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has hit back at Senator Rand Paul after he – and fellow squad member Ilhan Omar – blasted the 31-year-old for getting the COVID-19 vaccine before frontline workers and the elderly.

The Democrat socialist came under fire after she got the first dose of the vaccine Friday, with many accusing her of jumping the queue ahead of higher-risk Americans.   

AOC defended her decision and slammed the GOP for downplaying the pandemic and undermining ‘public faith in science, masks & COVID itself’, which she said has created a need for lawmakers like herself to get vaccinated to try to build confidence in it. 

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has hit back at Senator Rand Paul after he – and fellow squad member Ilhan Omar – blasted the 31-year-old for getting the COVID-19 vaccine before frontline workers and the elderly. Pictured AOC getting the shot live on social media

AOC defended her decision and slammed the GOP for downplaying the pandemic and undermining 'public faith in science, masks & COVID itself', which she said has created a need for politicians to try to build confidence in the vaccine

AOC defended her decision and slammed the GOP for downplaying the pandemic and undermining ‘public faith in science, masks & COVID itself’, which she said has created a need for politicians to try to build confidence in the vaccine 

‘Gee, maybe if the GOP hadn’t spent so much time undermining public faith in science, masks,& COVID itself, I wouldn’t have to weigh the potential misinfo consequences of what wld happen if leaders urged ppl to take a new vaccine that we weren’t taking ourselves!’ AOC fired back at Paul on Twitter.

She added: ‘& @ me next time.’

In a follow-up tweet, the congresswoman then told the Republican to listen to his constituents and said it was important to ‘show we won’t ask others to do something we wouldn’t do ourselves’.

‘Our job is to make sure the vaccine isn’t politicized the way masks were politicized,’ she wrote.

‘If you actually listened to your constituents, you’d hear a LOT about viral claims about repro health. 

‘Ppl have ?s Leaders shld show we won’t ask others to do something we wouldn’t do ourselves.’

AOC was responding to a tweet from Paul where he singled her out for going ahead of elderly people and healthcare workers.

He insisted he wouldn’t take the vaccine yet because it would be ‘inappropriate’. 

‘I was asked about getting vaccinated with others in Congress: It is inappropriate for me – who has already gotten the virus/has immunity – to get in front of elderly/healthcare workers,’ he tweeted Monday.

‘Same goes for AOC or any young healthy person. They should be among last, not first.’ 

The Kentucky Senator, who contracted COVID-19 in March, had hit out at AOC earlier Monday when speaking to reporters on Capitol Hill as he said he should be among the last to get a vaccine. 

‘I think it would be unconscionable for somebody who’s had it to get in front of somebody who hasn’t had it to take a vaccine,’ Paul said. 

‘I think it’s unconscionable for AOC, who’s 30 years old, to be smiling gleefully and getting the vaccine when you got 85-year-old people in nursing homes who haven’t gotten it.’  

Senator Rand Paul singled out AOC for going ahead of elderly people and healthcare workers and insisted he wouldn't take the vaccine yet because it would be 'inappropriate'

Senator Rand Paul singled out AOC for going ahead of elderly people and healthcare workers and insisted he wouldn’t take the vaccine yet because it would be ‘inappropriate’

AOC has also come under fire for getting the shot from some of her own. 

Rep. Ilhan Omar tweeted Sunday that it was ‘disturbing’ that her fellow lawmakers were able to get vaccinated before frontline workers and the elderly. 

‘It’s now clear that we don’t have enough vaccines for everybody and there is a shortage of supply, we have to prioritize those who need it most,’ Omar tweeted Sunday. 

‘That’s why it’s disturbing to see members be first to get vaccine while most frontline workers, elderly and infirm in our districts, wait.’ 

Omar linked to an interview she did earlier in the month on CNN, when she had argued the same thing when early reports said White House staff would have access to the COVID-19 vaccine before most Americans.  

‘Our frontline workers who’ve made the sacrifice to make the country run should be the priority, people who’ve been disproportionately impacted should be the priority,’ she said then.  

AOC has also come under fire for getting the shot from some of her own. Rep. Ilhan Omar (above) called it 'disturbing' that members of Congress were getting the coronavirus vaccine before frontline workers and the elderly

AOC has also come under fire for getting the shot from some of her own. Rep. Ilhan Omar (above) called it ‘disturbing’ that members of Congress were getting the coronavirus vaccine before frontline workers and the elderly 

Omar tweeted her disgust Sunday, linking to a CNN interview she did earlier in the months when she argued White House staff also shouldn't get the vaccine first

Omar tweeted her disgust Sunday, linking to a CNN interview she did earlier in the months when she argued White House staff also shouldn’t get the vaccine first 

Ocasio-Cortez, who is the youngest member of Congress until Republican Madison Cawthorn gets sworn-in in January, detailed getting the vaccine on her Instagram story Friday. 

AOC said she found out she and other members of Congress would have access to the vaccine because of the ‘continuity of governance’ plan, ‘basically a national security measure,’ she explained to her Instagram followers. 

She urged her social media followers to send in their questions, writing: ‘Just like wearing a mask, I’d never advise you to do something I wasn’t willing to do myself.’  

She detailed the logistics around getting the vaccine – including a whole post about potential side-effects – before responding to a viewer’s question about why politicians were getting it before some healthcare workers. 

‘I was actually surprised by this too — I was expecting that we were going to get it a lot later,’ she said. 

Ocasio-Cortez, who will be the youngest member of Congress until Republican Madison Cawthorn gets sworn-in in January, detailed getting the vaccine on her Instagram story Friday

Ocasio-Cortez, who will be the youngest member of Congress until Republican Madison Cawthorn gets sworn-in in January, detailed getting the vaccine on her Instagram story Friday 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (bottom) flashes a peace sign and is surrounded by Sen. James Lankford (left), Rep. Jamie Raskin (center), and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (right) as she took the shot Friday

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (bottom) flashes a peace sign and is surrounded by Sen. James Lankford (left), Rep. Jamie Raskin (center), and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (right) as she took the shot Friday

‘But when it comes to Congress’s access, it’s due to something known as “continuity of governance” planning.

‘Basically, there are national security politics on the books to ensure continuity of governance during national emergencies.’ 

Those in the US government began getting the Pfizer Friday, with Vice President Mike Pence getting the first injection alongside his wife Karen and Surgeon General Jerome Adams. 

Later in the day, both House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell got the vaccine.   

On Monday, President-elect Joe Biden received his first dose of the vaccine in Delaware, not long after his wife and soon-to-be First Lady Jill Biden. 

Republicans, including Sen. Marco Rubio who downplayed the virus and attended Donald Trump’s packed rallies, also went ahead and got the vaccine. 

CNN commentator Ana Navarro-Cardenas lashed out at Rubio for being among those to get vaccinated first.  

‘Young, healthy Senator, who spoke at rallies packed w/thousands w/o masks, who supports Trump -who’s down-played COVID & mocked those who wear masks, is 1st to get vaccine while most medical workers, elderly & infirm Americans, wait, Navarro Cardenas tweeted. 

‘Congratulations on ur privilege, @marcorubio.’    

Donald Trump has not taken the vaccine. The president was hospitalized with COVID-19 in October and, on his release, claimed he was ‘immune’ to the virus. 

However he has not publicly stated why he has not been vaccinated.   

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Ilhan Omar slams lawmakers like AOC for getting Covid vaccine first

Rep. Ilhan Omar called it ‘disturbing’ that her fellow lawmakers, including her 31-year-old ‘squad’-mate Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, were able to get vaccinated against the coronavirus before frontline workers and the elderly. 

‘It’s now clear that we don’t have enough vaccines for everybody and there is a shortage of supply, we have to prioritize those who need it most,’ Omar tweeted Sunday. ‘That’s why it’s disturbing to see members be first to get vaccine while most frontline workers, elderly and infirm in our districts, wait.’ 

Omar linked to an interview she did earlier in the month on CNN, when she had argued the same thing when early reports said White House staff would have access to the COVID-19 vaccine before most Americans. 

Rep. Ilhan Omar called it ‘disturbing’ that members of Congress were getting the coronavirus vaccine before frontline workers and the elderly 

Omar tweeted her disgust Sunday, linking to a CNN interview she did earlier in the months when she argued White House staff also shouldn't get the vaccine first

Omar tweeted her disgust Sunday, linking to a CNN interview she did earlier in the months when she argued White House staff also shouldn’t get the vaccine first 

Among the lawmakers to get the COVID-19 vaccine was 31-year-old 'squad' member, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who documented the experience on her Instagram

Among the lawmakers to get the COVID-19 vaccine was 31-year-old ‘squad’ member, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who documented the experience on her Instagram 

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (bottom) flashes a peace sign and is surrounded by Sen. James Lankford (left), Rep. Jamie Raskin (center), and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (right)

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (bottom) flashes a peace sign and is surrounded by Sen. James Lankford (left), Rep. Jamie Raskin (center), and Rep. Rashida Tlaib (right) 

‘Our frontline workers who’ve made the sacrifice to make the country run should be the priority, people who’ve been disproportionately impacted should be the priority,’ she said then. 

President Donald Trump later tweeted that he believed White House staff shouldn’t get the vaccine before other, more vulnerable segments of the U.S. population. 

Those in the U.S. government began getting the Pfizer Friday, with Vice President Mike Pence getting the first injection alongside his wife Karen and Surgeon General Jerome Adams. 

Later in the day, both House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell got the vaccine.   

Those in leadership weren’t the only members of Congress able to get the vaccine – it was made available to everyone. 

Ocasio-Cortez explained that she was able to get vaccinated ahead of most Americans because of the government's 'continuity of governance' plan

Ocasio-Cortez explained that she was able to get vaccinated ahead of most Americans because of the government’s ‘continuity of governance’ plan 

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio took some heat for getting the vaccine after appearing at President Donald Trump's packed, nearly mask-less rallies and downplaying the dangers of the pandemic

Republican Sen. Marco Rubio took some heat for getting the vaccine after appearing at President Donald Trump’s packed, nearly mask-less rallies and downplaying the dangers of the pandemic 

Sen. Rand Paul reiterated a point he made to reporters Monday on his Twitter account saying that he should be among the last to be vaccinated, since he already had COVID-19, and also knocked AOC for taking it

Sen. Rand Paul reiterated a point he made to reporters Monday on his Twitter account saying that he should be among the last to be vaccinated, since he already had COVID-19, and also knocked AOC for taking it 

Ocasio-Cortez, who will be the youngest member of Congress until Republican Madison Cawthorn gets sworn-in in January, detailed getting the vaccine on her Instagram story. 

AOC said she found out she and other members of Congress would have access to the vaccine because of the ‘continuity of governance’ plan, ‘basically a national security measure,’ she explained to her Instagram followers.  

Republicans, including Sen. Marco Rubio who downplayed the virus and attended President Donald Trump’s packed rallies, also went ahead and got the vaccine. 

CNN commentator Ana Navarro-Cardenas lashed out at Rubio for being among those to get vaccinated first.  

‘Young, healthy Senator, who spoke at rallies packed w/thousands w/o masks, who supports Trump -who’s down-played COVID & mocked those who wear masks, is 1st to get vaccine while most medical workers, elderly & infirm Americans, wait, Navarro Cardenas tweeted. ‘Congratulations on ur privilege, @marcorubio.’ 

But not every Republican lined up to get vaccinated. 

Sen. Rand Paul, who had COVID-19 in March, said he should be among the last to get a vaccine – and knocked Ocasio-Cortez for getting it. 

‘I think it would be unconscionable for somebody who’s had it to get in front of somebody who hasn’t had it to take a vaccine,’ Paul told reporters on Capitol Hill Monday. ‘I think it’s unconscionable for AOC, who’s 30 years old, to be smiling gleefully and getting the vaccine when you got 85-year-old people in nursing homes who haven’t gotten it.’ 

After speaking with reporters, Paul also tweeted this point. 

‘I was asked about getting vaccinated with others in Congress: It is inappropriate for me – who has already gotten the virus/has immunity – to get in front of elderly/healthcare workers,’ he wrote. ‘Same goes for AOC or any young healthy person. They should be among last, not first.’ 

In June, Omar lost her father, Nur Omar Mohamed, to complications from COVID-19. 

More recently she’s been critical of the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic when speaking about her father’s death. 

‘My father and over 300,000 people have lost their lives because of dangerous criminal neglect by Trump and his administration. My father should be here today. So many of our family members should be here today and they’re not here with us because we have leaders who didn’t care about their lives,’ she said last week in an interview with MSNBC. 

‘The president, to this day, has not shown an ounce of compassion to the people who have passed away,’ she said. ‘He has still not acknowledged the devastating loss, so many of us are feeling.’   

She said the administration’s failures should be investigated.  

‘We have to investigate and prosecute these people who are responsible for these reckless deaths,’ Omar said.