Who will be boxing’s next godfather?

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RIMOUSKI | The departure of Michel Hamelin calls into question several aspects of his work. Hamelin had very good years with the Régie des alcools, des courses et des jeux. In fact, he’s taken the demands of his job to the next level.

Everyone in the administration of boxing and combat sports has been meeting in Rimouski for a few days. And people, employees, inspectors, promoters and journalists are already talking about Hamelin’s possible successor.

And the message is for Nathalie Gagné and Joyce Tremblay, two of the strong women of the Régie: everyone is afraid like the plague of ending up with any civil servant parachuted from the bureaucracy by the bureaucracy.

The rare pearl

And everyone, he’s right. Michel Hamelin, despite his fatigue over the past two years, was the ideal godfather. He understood the local environment, he was comfortable with international promoters, big and small, and he knew how to smell the problems of boxers.

Michel Hamelin was not a big boxing expert when he accepted the position of godfather in Quebec. But he had a great mentor in Mario Latraverse.

What reassures me is the calm and reassuring presence of Jean Douville. Mr. Douville, who is a few years older than the 72 I was talking about yesterday, did a very good job in Rimouski as he did in Shawinigan. He was the quiet force that made things happen.

In other words, if we judge that he is too old, we cannot deny his great experience and competence. Not to mention his proven authority.

I emphasize this forcefully because Jean Douville as a mentor allows the Régie to find a candidate who will have two or three years to acquire experience and knowledge of boxing and the environment. He doesn’t have to be a federation …

Bernard Barré

The directors of the Régie will have to think seriously because the candidates are not that many. A man like Nicolas Esnault could have an ideal profile. He is young, in his forties, he had a great amateur career and is a senior administrator. It would be Antonin Décarie’s choice. But Décarie was the first to admit that Esnault, a successful businessman, would find it difficult to leave his company for the full-time position of boss of combat sports in Quebec.

There would be Bernard Barré who could be a prestigious candidate. He comes from an amateur boxing federation and he is absolutely passionate about boxing. He knows everything. In addition, by running in the federal election twice for the Conservative Party, we can be sure that an in-depth investigation has been carried out by the PC to ensure his “virginity”. These investigations bring the skeletons out of the cupboards every time.

The problem is that Bernard Barré has been associated with Yvon Michel for more than thirty years. And we know, the loves between Michel and Camille Estephan are at -30. More frigid than that, you’re a corpse.

It is certain that Estephan would oppose the nomination of Bernard Barré. Even if Barré, an excellent analyst, works in the Punching Grace network. He was in Rimouski last night for the gala.

Jean Langevin

Several names have circulated. Ariane Fortin’s one deserves our attention. But she is very young, and no one knows what her reaction would be to the demands of some aspiring promoters.

We spoke to 91.9 about Richard Legendre. But Legendre now occupies an interesting post at the university. Otherwise, with solid mentorship, he would have learned the business in two or three years.

Yesterday, in Rimouski, it was the name of Jean Langevin that had the most consensus. He’s been an inspector for three or four years, he’s been around the world with F1 with his company PPGI, he’s learned how to handle the Bernie Ecclestones of this world and he’s able to have a solid column.

Here again, it is the Jean Douvilles, Denis Labrecque and Robert Chevrier, former lieutenants of Michel Hamelin, who could provide mentorship.

Whichever one you choose, these yesterday’s alumni will have to support him.

Ulysses: “This is my answer”

RIMOUSKI – “I don’t want to make big statements. Tonight is my answer! Junior Ulysses whispered through his mask.

Ulysses appeared to be walled in the state of mind he has displayed throughout the week. He never laughed, never seemed happy during the minutes we spent together. Even when Camille Estephan indicated that Junior Ulysses’ explanations concerning his absence at the press conference had convinced him, this anger or this frustration, Ulysses knew how to channel it. And he showed a fighting spirit and an aggressiveness that we had not known him for years.

Ulysses completely dominated the match. Bigger, stronger and faster, he taught his opponent a real lesson. In fact, we have seen the Yves Ulysse that we hoped for in vain too often. Hats off for a very nice demonstration. And long live men of character.

Claggett’s victory

The semi-final was as expected. A dazzling and energetic start from David Théroux who ran out of steam ahead of Steve Claggett.

But considering the time Théroux spent in training, I was reassured by the pace of the fight. Théroux has just joined the real ones. He doesn’t have to be ashamed of his loss.

IN THE CALEPIN – There were more police in the Rimouski hotel than in a Black Blocs riot. We greeted them, they may be playing in District 31. There were Eric Boucher from the Rimouski Oceanic and Simon Kean and his whore around his left fist. Shined in their absence were Michel Hamelin, Évelyne Morrisseau from Videotron, Brad Pitt, Jean-Marc Gagné from Canadian Tire and Stéphan Larouche.

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